Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Outstanding Reviewers for Polymer Chemistry in 2016

Following the success of Peer Review Week in September 2016 (dedicated to reviewer recognition) during which we published a list of our top reviewers, we are delighted to announce that we will continue to recognise the contribution that our reviewers make to the journal by announcing our Outstanding Reviewers each year.

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Polymer Chemistry in 2016, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Dr Athina Anastasaki, University of California Santa Barbara
Dr Brigitte Bibal, Universite Bordeaux
Dr Cyrille Boyer, University of New South Wales
Dr Gaojian Chen, Soochow University
Dr Priyadarsi De, IISER Kolkata
Dr Sophie Guillaume, Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes
Dr Xiaoyu Huang, Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry
Dr Elango Kumarasamy, Colombia University
Dr F.J. Xu, Beijing University of Chemical Technology
Professor Youliang Zhao, Soochow University

We would also like to thank the Polymer Chemistry board and the journal community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre.

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Royal Society of Chemistry and ACS Publications commit to ORCID integration

Yesterday, the Royal Society of Chemistry and the American Chemical Society Publications Division, ACS Publications, both signed the ORCID Open Letter committing to unambiguous identification of all authors that publish in our journals.

The official press release can be found here: http://rsc.li/orcid

In brief, this partnership with ORCID will resolve ambiguity in researcher identification caused by name changes, cultural differences in name presentation, and the inconsistent use of name abbreviations, thereby ensuring their contributions are appropriately recognized and credited.

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Lectureship winner featured on our back cover

We are immensely proud to share our back cover for Issue 40.

This beautiful image highlights research results by Professor Feihe Huang at University, Hangzhou, China. Professor Huang is the recipient of the 2016 Polymer Chemistry Lectureship award.

Pillar[5]arene-based amphiphilic supramolecular brush copolymers: fabrication,
controllable self-assembly and application in self-imaging targeted drug delivery

Guocan Yu, Feihe Huang, and co-workers fabricated the first pillar[5]arene-based amphiphilic supramolecular brush copolymer, which was utilized as a self-imaging drug delivery vehicle by taking advantage of the aggregation-induced emission effect.

In vitro and in vivo investigations demonstrated this supramolecular theranostic nanomaterial exhibited excellent antitumor efficacy with negligible systemic toxicity.

Read the full article

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In celebration of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

The 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was jointly awarded to Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Sir J. Fraser Stoddart and Bernard L. Feringa for their work on the design and synthesis of molecular machines.

Developing the world’s smallest machines: Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Fraser Stoddart and Bernard Feringa

Jean-Pierre Sauvage took the first step towards a molecular machine in 1983, when he successfully  linked two ring-shaped molecules together to form a chain, called a catenane. The molecules in this chain are linked by a mechanical bond, allowing the two interlocked rings to move relative to each other, performing like a tiny machine.

Fraser Stoddart took the second step in 1991, when he developed a rotaxane by threading a molecular ring onto a thin molecular axle. The ring is able to move along the axle enabling a number of developments such as a molecular lift, a molecular muscle and a molecule-based computer chip.

Bernard Feringa took the third step by developing the first molecular motor in 1999 when he got a molecular rotor blade to spin continually in the same direction. Using molecular motors, he has rotated a glass cylinder that is 10,000 times bigger than the motor and also designed a nanocar!

The ground breaking steps taken by the 2016 Nobel Laureates in Chemistry in developing molecular machinery have resulted in a toolbox of chemical structures that can be used by researchers around the world to build anything from artificial switches and release-targeted drugs to novel energy storage systems!

To celebrate these remarkable achievements, we are delighted to present a collection of recent Soft Matter and Polymer Chemistry articles on molecular machines FREE to read until 1 December 2016!

We invite you to submit your best research related to molecular machines to Soft Matter and Polymer Chemistry!


Reviews
Integrated motion of molecular machines in supramolecular polymeric scaffolds
Xuzhou Yan, Bo Zheng and Feihe Huang
Polym. Chem., 2013, 4, 2395-2399
DOI: 10.1039/C3PY00060E

Research articles
Topological energy storage of work generated by nanomotors
Fabian Weysser, Olivier Benzerara, Albert Johner and Igor M. Kulić
Soft Matter, 2015, 11, 732-740
DOI: 10.1039/C4SM02294G

Hydrodynamics and propulsion mechanism of self-propelled catalytic micromotors: model and experiment
Longqiu Li, Jiyuan Wang, Tianlong Li, Wenping Song and Guangyu Zhang
Soft Matter, 2014, 10, 7511-7518
DOI: 10.1039/C4SM01070A

Construction of muscle-like metallo-supramolecular polymers from a pillar[5]arene-based [c2]daisy chain
Lingyan Gao, Zibin Zhang, Bo Zheng and Feihe Huang
Polym. Chem., 2014, 5, 5734-5739
DOI: 10.1039/C4PY00733F

An acid/base switchable and reversibly cross-linkable polyrotaxane
Shijun Li, Guan-Huan Weng, Wei Lin, Zhi-Bin Sun, Mi Zhou, Bin Zhu, Yang Ye and Jing Wu
Polym. Chem., 2014, 5, 3994-4001
DOI: 10.1039/C4PY00409D

Dual stimuli-responsive supramolecular pseudo-polyrotaxane hydrogels
Lipeng Zhou, Jiaxi Li, Quan Luo, Junyan Zhu, Huixin Zou, Yuzhou Gao, Liang Wang, Jiayun Xu, Zeyuan Dong and Junqiu Liu
Soft Matter, 2013, 9, 4635-4641
DOI: 10.1039/C3SM27776C

pH-responsive dendritic polyrotaxane drug-polymer conjugates forming nanoparticles as efficient drug delivery system for cancer therapy
Yang Kang, Xiao-Mei Zhang, Sheng Zhang, Li-Sheng Ding and Bang-Jing Li
Polym. Chem., 2015, 6, 2098-2107
DOI: 10.1039/C4PY01431F

Phototriggered supramolecular polymerization of a [c2]daisy chain rotaxane
Xin Fu, Rui-Rui Gu, Qi Zhang, Si-Jia Rao, Xiu-Li Zheng, Da-Hui Qu and He Tian
Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 2166-2170
DOI: 10.1039/C6PY00309E


Also of interest: Find out more about the three Chemistry Nobel Laureates and their research.

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Spare a penny for your polymers

Scientists in the UK have discovered that a one-penny coin can catalyse polymerisations. The penny not only made the reaction start faster than the commonly used copper wire catalyst, but could also produce up to 50g of polymer in one batch.

Source: Royal Society of Chemistry

Source: Royal Society of Chemistry

Single electron transfer living radical polymerisation is one of the most used reactions to produce everyday polymers such as polystyrene and acrylics. Polymerisation reactions need a catalyst to get them started – copper wire being the most common one. However, pure copper’s high cost can be restrictive.

To read the full article visit Chemistry World.

R. Aksakal, M. Resmini and C. R. Becer
Polym. Chem., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6PY01295G, Communication
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Top 10 Reviewers for Polymer Chemistry

In celebration of Peer Review Week, with the theme of Recognition for Review, we would like to highlight the top 10 reviewers for Polymer Chemistry in 2016, as selected by the editor for their significant contribution to the journal.

Top 10 Reviewers for Polymer Chemistry:
– Dr Fujian Xu – BUCT, China
– Dr Xiaoyu Huang – Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, China
– Dr Feihe Huang – Zhejiang University, China
– Dr Priyadarsi De – Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Kolkata, India
– Dr Youliang Zhao – Soochow University, China
– Dr Jingyin Yuan – Tsinghua University, China
– Dr Cyrille Boyer – University of New South Wales, Australia
– Dr Athina Anastasaki – University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
– Dr Leyong Wang – Nanjing University, China
– Professor Zhen Li – Wuhan University, China

We would like to say a massive thank you to these reviewers as well as the Polymer Chemistry board and all of the polymer chemistry community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

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3D printing enters the next dimension

Scientists in the US have added a new dimension to 3D printing with a strategy that controls the chemical composition of printed features, as well as their three-dimensional position.

The University of Miami team’s setup allows controlling both 3D position and monomer composition of a photopolymerisable mixture

With 3D printing systems becoming more mainstream, platforms that overcome their current limitations are increasingly relevant. Ideally, they should print different polymers close together, independently control their position and be compatible with delicate organic and biologically active materials.

To read the full article please visit Chemistry World.

Optimization of 4D polymer printing within a massively parallel flow-through photochemical microreactor
Xiaoming Liu, Yeting Zheng, Samuel R. Peurifoy, Ezan A. Kothari and Adam B. Braunschweig �
Polym. Chem., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6PY00283H, Paper

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Polymer Chemistry welcomes new Associate Editor Hong Chen and new Advisory Board members!

We are delighted to welcome Professor Hong Chen (Soochow University, China) to the PolymerChemistry Editorial Board as an Associate Editor, as well as our new Advisory Board members.

Leading the Macromolecules and Biointerface Lab (MacBio), a key laboratory at Soochow University, Hong’s research interests include surface modification and functionalisation of biomaterials, interactions between biomaterials and proteins or cells, the hemocompatibility of biomaterials, and biological detection.

An experienced editor, Hong was previously a member of the Polymer Chemistry Advisory Board. She has made a significant contribution to the field and to the journal, and we are very excited to have her take a leading role in the Polymer Chemistry team!

As a Polymer Chemistry Associate Editor, Hong will be handling submissions to the journal. Why not submit your next paper to her Editorial Office?

To find out more about Hong’s research, take a look at her recent Polymer Chemistry papers:

Efficient cancer cell capturing SiNWAs prepared via surface-initiated SET-LRP and click chemistry
Lulu Xue, Zhonglin Lyu, Yafei Luan, Xinhong Xiong, Jingjing Pan, Gaojian Chen and Hong Chen
Polym. Chem., 2015, 6, 3708-3715

Facile synthesis, sequence-tuned thermoresponsive behaviours and reaction-induced reorganization of water-soluble keto-polymers
Xianghua Tang, Jie Han, Zhengguang Zhu, Xinhua Lu, Hong Chen and Yuanli Cai
Polym. Chem., 2014, 5, 4115-4123

Combining surface topography with polymer chemistry: exploring new interfacial biological phenomena
Dan Li, Qing Zheng, Yanwei Wang and Hong Chen
Polym. Chem., 2014, 5, 14-24

We also warmly welcome our new Advisory Board members to the Polymer Chemistry team:

  • Matthew Becker, University of Akron, USA
  • Xuesi Chen, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
  • Didier Gigmes, Aix-Marseilles Université, CNRS, France
  • Sophie Guillaume, Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, France
  • Thomas Junkers, Hasselt University, Belgium
  • Toyoji Kakuchi, Hokkaido University, Japan
  • Jacques Lalevée, Institut de Science des Matériaux de Mulhouse, France
  • Guey-Sheng Liou, National Taiwan University, Taiwan
  • Ravin Narain, University of Alberta, Canada
  • Felix Schacher, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Germany
  • Lei Tao, Tsinghua University, China
  • Yusuf Yagci, Istanbul Technical University, Turkey

The full Polymer Chemistry team can be found on our website.

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Polymers curl up and take control

Scientists in Germany have successfully collapsed single polymer chains into dense nanoparticles, to make single-chain nanoparticles, by adding palladium.1 The nanoparticles mimic enzymatic pockets with defined environments around their metal centres and can catalyse a carbon coupling reaction.

The intramolecular crosslinking process creates single-chain nanoparticles that catalyse a Sonogashira coupling reaction

Enzymes use their carefully shaped reaction cavities to selectively catalyse organic reactions. Industrial processes crave selectivity, but also demand straightforward procedures. Synthesising and separating enzymes in practical quantities is, however, tricky, so they aren’t always suitable for industry. One solution to this might be single-chain nanoparticles, which have recently become a hot topic in the field of polymer chemistry.2 Their applications range from sensing to recognition, and medicine to catalysis, but only a few groups have studied their synthesis and even fewer have looked at the introduction of metals.

To read the full article visit Chemistry World.

Pd-complex driven formation of single-chain nanoparticles
Johannes Willenbacher, Ozcan Altintas, Vanessa Trouillet, Nicolai Knöfel, Michael J. Monteiro, Peter W. Roesky and Christopher Barner-Kowollik
Polym. Chem., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5PY00389J, Paper

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Polymer Chemistry is going weekly

From 2015, Polymer Chemistry will be moving to weekly publication. We will be increasing the number of issues per year from the current 24 to 48 whilst maintaing the high quality of the journal.

This is great news and a very positive way to mark Polymer Chemistry‘s fifth anniversary next year. It is because of the support we receive from the community that Polymer Chemistry has been going from strength to strength, and we would like to thank all of our readers, authors, referees and board members for their contributions to the journal.

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