Archive for the ‘Editorial Board’ Category

Welcome to our new Associate Editors

Filip graduatProfoessor Filip Du Prezed from his postgraduate studies in macromolecular chemistry from Ghent (Belgium) and Lehigh (USA) University in 1996, after which he carried out postdoctoral research at the University of Montpellier and at Ghent University (UGent). In 1999, he ultimately became research leader of the Polymer Chemistry Research group (PCR) within the Centre of Macromolecular Chemistry (CMaC) at Ghent University, where he now leads a research group of 25 researchers and the UGent valorization consortium Chemtech as full professor.

Filip’s current research focuses on the development of new polymer structures, the exploration of powerful polymer functionalization methods and the design of polymer materials for high-value applications. His team uses a highly interdisciplinary approach to develop in some cases industrially applicable polymer materials. The main research themes of his research are on 1) polymer functionalization to absolute control, 2) dynamic and self-healing polymeric materials such as vitrimers and 3) increasing the functionality of renewable polymers.

Read some of his recent Polymer Chemistry articles below!

Polycycloacetals via polytransacetalization of diglycerol bisacetonide
Andrea Hufendiek,  Sophie Lingier,  Pieter Espeel,  Stefaan De Wildeman  and  Filip E. Du Prez
Polym. Chem., 2018, Advance Article

ADMET and TAD chemistry: a sustainable alliance
L. Vlaminck,  K. De Bruycker,  O. Türünç  and  F. E. Du Prez 
Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 5655-5663

Polydimethylsiloxane quenchable vitrimers

Polym. Chem., 2017, 8, 6590-6593

 

Professor Holger Frey

Holger Frey is a chaired Professor at the Institute of Organic Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and the author of 350 peer-reviewed original publications and reviews in different areas of current Polymer Science. He has been an Editorial Board member for Polymer Chemistry since June 2017 and has now moved role to become an Associate Editor.

His scope of interests is broad and comprises ionic polymerization techniques in general, hyperbranched materials (polyethers, polyesters, polycarbonates), silicon-based polymers, multifunctional poly(ethylene glycol)s, block copolymers and polymer nanostructures for drug transport. The current research interest of his group is centered on new functional polymers prepared via oxyanionic ring-opening polymerization, new approaches utilizing CO2 as a monomer, and non-conventional approaches in carbanionic polymer synthesis to generate gradient and multiblock structures, for instance as dispersants or for thermoplastic elastomers.

 Read some of his recent articles below!

“Clickable PEG” via anionic copolymerization of ethylene oxide and glycidyl propargyl ether
Jana Herzberger,  Daniel Leibig,  Jens Langhanki,  Christian Moers,  Till Opatz  and  Holger Frey
Polym. Chem., 2017, 8, 1882-1887

Tunable dynamic hydrophobic attachment of guest molecules in amphiphilic core–shell polymers
Jörg Reichenwallner,  Anja Thomas,  Lutz Nuhn,  Tobias Johann,  Annette Meister,  Holger Frey  and  Dariush Hinderberger
Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 5783-5798

Water-soluble and redox-responsive hyperbranched polyether copolymers based on ferrocenyl glycidyl ether
Arda Alkan,  Rebecca Klein,  Sergii I. Shylin,  Ulrike Kemmer-Jonas,  Holger Frey  and  Frederik R. Wurm
Polym. Chem., 2015, 6, 7112-7118

 


As Polymer Chemistry Associate Editors, Filip and Holger will be handling submissions to the journal. Why not submit your next paper to their Editorial Office?

 

 

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Welcome to our new Associate Editor Professor Zi-Chen Li

We are delighted to welcome Professor Zi-Chen Li (Peking University) to his role as a new Associate Editor for Polymer Chemistry!

Professor Zi-Chen Li

Zi-Chen Li received his B.A. degree from Shandong University in 1987 and his M.Sci. degree from the Institute of Chemistry, CAS, in 1990. In 1995, he completed his PhD in Polymer Chemistry under the direction of Professor Fu-Mian Li at Peking University (PKU).   During his doctoral studies, he stayed at Waseda University, Japan, for one year as an exchanging student. After a two-year (1995-1996) postdoctoral research stint at PKU and Waseda University, he became a faculty member at PKU in 1997, and was promoted to professor in 2002.

His primary research interests currently include new polymerization methods, stimuli-responsive polymers and their biomedical applications, controlled degradation of polymers and recycling of monomers.

To learn about his research read some of his Polymer Chemistry articles below!

 

Synthesis of a ROS-responsive analogue of poly(ε-caprolactone) by the living ring-opening polymerization of 1,4-oxathiepan-7-one
Linggao Li,  Qiyuan Wang,  Ruiliang Lyu,  Li Yu,  Shan Su,  Fu-Sheng Du  and  Zi-Chen Li
Polym. Chem., 2018, Advance Article

ROS-responsive poly(ε-caprolactone) with pendent thioether and selenide motifs
Li Yu,  Mei Zhang,  Fu-Sheng Du  and  Zi-Chen Li
Polym. Chem., 2018, 9, 3762-3773

Oxidation and temperature dual responsive polymers based on phenylboronic acid and N-isopropylacrylamide motifs
Mei Zhang,  Cheng-Cheng Song,  Ran Ji,  Zeng-Ying Qiao,  Chao Yang,  Fang-Yi Qiu,  De-Hai Liang,  Fu-Sheng Du  and  Zi-Chen Li
Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 1494-1504

 

As a Polymer Chemistry Associate Editor, Zi-Chen will be handling submissions to the journal. Why not submit your next paper to his Editorial Office?

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Polymer Chemistry welcomes new Associate Editors Tanja Junkers and Jeremiah Johnson

We are delighted to welcome Professor Tanja Junkers (Monash University) and Professor Jeremiah A. Johnson (MIT) as Associate Editors for Polymer Chemistry!

 

Tanja JunkersProfessor Tanja Junkers studied chemistry and graduated with a PhD in physical chemistry from Göttingen University. In January 2018 she became full professor at Monash University in Melbourne, she remains guest professor at Hasselt University and her group is currently active at both locations.

Her main research interests are precision polymer synthesis, use of continuous flow chemistry approaches, light-induced chemistries, polymer surface modification and investigations on kinetics and mechanisms of radical reactions. To find out more about her research read some of her recent publications below!

Visible light-induced iniferter polymerization of methacrylates enhanced by continuous flow
Maarten Rubens,  Phanumat Latsrisaeng  and  Tanja Junkers
Polym. Chem., 2017,8, 6496-6505

RAFT multiblock reactor telescoping: from monomers to tetrablock copolymers in a continuous multistage reactor cascade
Evelien Baeten,  Joris J. Haven  and  Tanja Junkers
Polym. Chem., 2017,8, 3815-3824

 

 

Jeremiah Johnson
Professor Jeremiah Johnson is now an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry at MIT. He was previously an Editorial Board member for Polymer Chemistry.

His research focuses on researching molecular design in three primary areas: nano-scale materials synthesis, macro-scale materials synthesis, and development of new chemical methods for modifying interfaces between bulk and nanoscale objects (surface chemistry). The tools of traditional organic and organometallic synthesis, synthetic polymer chemistry, photochemistry, surface science, and biopolymer engineering are combined to realize the design of target materials. To find out more about his research read some of his publications below!

Improving photo-controlled living radical polymerization from trithiocarbonates through the use of continuous-flow techniques
Mao Chen  and  Jeremiah A. Johnson
Chem. Commun., 2015,51, 6742-6745

Tailoring the structure of polymer networks with iniferter-mediated photo-growth
Awaneesh Singh,  Olga Kuksenok,  Jeremiah A. Johnson  and  Anna C. Balazs
Polym. Chem., 2016,7, 2955-2964

 

As Polymer Chemistry Associate Editors, Tanja and Jeremiah will be handling submissions to the journal. Why not submit your next paper to their Editorial Office?

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Welcoming our new Polymer Chemistry Editor-in-Chief

We are excited to welcome new Editor-in-Chief Christopher Barner-Kowollik (Queensland University of Technology) to the Polymer Chemistry Editorial Board

 

 

Prof. Barner-Kowollik

Christopher Barner-Kowollik is Professor of Materials Science and head of the Soft Matter Materials Laboratory at the Queensland University of Technology. He has published over 510 peer-reviewed studies and won several awards for his research, most recently the coveted Erwin-Schrödinger Award of the Helmholtz association (2016) and a Laureate Fellowship from the Australian Research Council (2017).

His main research interests are situated at the interface of organic, polymer and biochemistry and focus on a wide range of polymer-related research fields, such as the (photochemical) synthesis of complex macromolecular architectures with highly-defined functionality and composition, advanced synthesis via polymer ligation techniques and macromolecular transformations at ambient temperature in solution and on surfaces, with a strong focus on light-induced methodologies, advanced photolithographic processes, fundamental investigations into polymerization mechanisms and kinetics, as well as high resolution imaging and characterization of macromolecular chain structures via mass spectrometric methods in solution and on surfaces.

 

Christopher has been an Associate Editor for Polymer Chemistry since 2009, and we are delighted that he has agreed to become our new Editor-in-Chief! Welcome to the new position!

Christopher takes over from Professor David Haddleton, who has led the journal since its launch in 2009. We would like to thank Professor Haddleton for his excellent work as Editor-in-Chief and will be delighted to continue working with him as an Advisory Board member.

As Polymer Chemistry Editor-in-Chief, Christopher will be handling submissions to the journal. Why not submit your next paper to his Editorial Office?

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Polymer Chemistry welcomes new Associate Editor Hong Chen and new Advisory Board members!

We are delighted to welcome Professor Hong Chen (Soochow University, China) to the PolymerChemistry Editorial Board as an Associate Editor, as well as our new Advisory Board members.

Leading the Macromolecules and Biointerface Lab (MacBio), a key laboratory at Soochow University, Hong’s research interests include surface modification and functionalisation of biomaterials, interactions between biomaterials and proteins or cells, the hemocompatibility of biomaterials, and biological detection.

An experienced editor, Hong was previously a member of the Polymer Chemistry Advisory Board. She has made a significant contribution to the field and to the journal, and we are very excited to have her take a leading role in the Polymer Chemistry team!

As a Polymer Chemistry Associate Editor, Hong will be handling submissions to the journal. Why not submit your next paper to her Editorial Office?

To find out more about Hong’s research, take a look at her recent Polymer Chemistry papers:

Efficient cancer cell capturing SiNWAs prepared via surface-initiated SET-LRP and click chemistry
Lulu Xue, Zhonglin Lyu, Yafei Luan, Xinhong Xiong, Jingjing Pan, Gaojian Chen and Hong Chen
Polym. Chem., 2015, 6, 3708-3715

Facile synthesis, sequence-tuned thermoresponsive behaviours and reaction-induced reorganization of water-soluble keto-polymers
Xianghua Tang, Jie Han, Zhengguang Zhu, Xinhua Lu, Hong Chen and Yuanli Cai
Polym. Chem., 2014, 5, 4115-4123

Combining surface topography with polymer chemistry: exploring new interfacial biological phenomena
Dan Li, Qing Zheng, Yanwei Wang and Hong Chen
Polym. Chem., 2014, 5, 14-24

We also warmly welcome our new Advisory Board members to the Polymer Chemistry team:

  • Matthew Becker, University of Akron, USA
  • Xuesi Chen, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
  • Didier Gigmes, Aix-Marseilles Université, CNRS, France
  • Sophie Guillaume, Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, France
  • Thomas Junkers, Hasselt University, Belgium
  • Toyoji Kakuchi, Hokkaido University, Japan
  • Jacques Lalevée, Institut de Science des Matériaux de Mulhouse, France
  • Guey-Sheng Liou, National Taiwan University, Taiwan
  • Ravin Narain, University of Alberta, Canada
  • Felix Schacher, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Germany
  • Lei Tao, Tsinghua University, China
  • Yusuf Yagci, Istanbul Technical University, Turkey

The full Polymer Chemistry team can be found on our website.

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Jeremiah Johnson joins the Polymer Chemistry Editorial Board

We are delighted to announce that Dr Jeremiah Johnson has become the newest member of the Polymer Chemistry Editorial Board.

Jeremiah is Firmenich Career Development Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA, having completed his PhD at Columbia University (USA) and a postdoc at California Institute of Technology (USA).

The Johnson lab focuses on researching molecular design in three primary areas: nano-scale materials synthesis, macro-scale materials synthesis, and development of new chemical methods for modifying interfaces between bulk and nanoscale objects (surface chemistry).

He was chosen by Chemical Communications as one of their Emerging Investigators of 2015. You can see his contribution to the themed issue here:

Improving photo-controlled living radical polymerization from trithiocarbonates through the use of continuous-flow techniques
Mao Chen and Jeremiah A. Johnson
Chem. Commun., 2015,51, 6742-6745

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Polymer Chemistry welcomes new Associate Editor Emily Pentzer

We are delighted to welcome our newest Polymer Chemistry Associate Editor: Emily Pentzer (Case Western Reserve University, USA).

Emily will start her role as Associate Editor on 1 July 2015.

Emily Pentzer Polymer Chemistry

Emily obtained a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from Butler University, USA in 2005. She then moved to Northwestern University, USA where she completed her PhD in 2010 under the supervision of Professor SonBinh T. Nguyen working on the development of new monomers for ring-opening metathesis polymerisation. Between 2010 and 2013 she was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA where she investigated the synthesis and assembly of n-type and p-type materials for organic photovoltaic applications, supervised by Professor Todd Emrick in the Department of Polymer Science and Engineering. Since July 2013, Emily has been at Case Western Reserve University, USA as an Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Her research addresses application-based materials problems in the areas of energy harvesting, management, and storage. She uses synthetic chemistry to tailor molecular design and control self-assembly for the preparation and study of novel conductive materials with controlled domain sizes and interfaces.

To find out more about Emily’s research take a look at her group’s website.

As a Polymer Chemistry Associate Editor, Emily will be handling submissions to the journal. Why not submit your next paper to her Editorial Office?

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Ben Zhong Tang interviewed in Chemistry World

Polymer Chemistry Associate Editor Ben Zhong Tang was interviewed for Chemistry World about his work on alkyne polymers and aggregation induced emission.

Here are some of the highlights:

Your research on aggregation induced emission (AIE) received a lot of attention. Can you tell us more about it?

There are a lot of light emitting materials. This type of material, if you dissolve it to make a dilute solution, gives a very strong emission. However, for many of these kinds of dyes, if their concentration becomes high, their emission becomes weaker. This phenomenon has often been referred to as aggregation-caused quenching or ACQ for short. This is a problem in things like mobile phone displays, where the light emitting material is used as thin solid film. In the solid state, you know, concentration is the highest.

We have developed a family of luminogenic materials that behave in exactly the opposite way. When they are in solution, there is no emission, but when they aggregate, they emit very efficiently. It’s unusual and intriguing: previously, people have tried to solve the problem of ACQ by trying to separate the light emitting molecules. But now we have a system where the more it aggregates, the better

You’ve used these systems recently to make biosensors.

Yes, one very good application for these systems is in biology. One of the reasons for this is that light emitting species are aromatic rings, which are hydrophobic. In the body, we don’t have organic solvents: we only have water. Water is hydrophilic, so it isn’t compatible with the aromatic molecules. Traditional ACQ systems are not very good for biological applications due to the aggregate formation, but our systems work well in water, also owing to the formation of aggregates!

What current problem would you like to see polymer chemistry provide a solution to?

There are so many problems! In China, pollution is a big issue and this includes plastics. If we can come up with an economic way to recycle polymers back to monomers, then make them into new polymers in an economic way, we could reduce environmental pollution. Energy, of course, is another issue. One day we may have a very good polymer-based solar cell.

Read the full interview on the Chemistry World website: Ben Zhong Tang: Polymers for a bright future

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Brent Sumerlin interviewed in Chemistry World

Polymer Chemistry Associate Editor Brent Sumerlin has been interviewed in Chemistry World! He talks to Laura Howes about his work developing smart polymers for delivering insulin to treat people with diabetes.

Here’s a sneak preview…

How would you describe your work?

We are synthetic polymer chemists and all of the materials we’re interested in are smart materials. They’re not really smart – they can only do one thing – but they do that one thing really well.

Usually they’re block copolymers in solution and they self-assemble or dissociate depending on the conditions around them like pH or temperature. We want to make polymers that respond to their environment and can be useful for things like drug delivery.

Is your work mainly focussed on drug delivery?

Yes, mainly. There are two ways of thinking about it. One would be to specifically release a compound in one environment under a specific set of conditions. Another way to think about it would be to instead encapsulate something under specific conditions. We haven’t done work in that area directly but it is common to use similar materials for, say, wastewater remediation. In both cases you’re trying to encapsulate something hydrophobic, it’s just whether you want to release it or not.

Do you have particular biological targets or problems you want to solve?

Most of our interest has been in the area of diabetes, and I think that’s what sets our work apart from a lot of other smart polymer chemists. Most people are working on cancer but diabetes is also a problem of growing importance. The polymers we work with respond to sugar, and under a high concentration of sugar they become hydrophilic. So if you can make an aggregate that’s held together by these polymers, when there’s a lot of sugar around, they become water-soluble and dissolve, potentially releasing insulin from inside. We like this approach because it combines the glucose monitoring and insulin production into one feedback step.

Read more about Brent’s research, and find out how he coped with moving his research group 1000 miles across the US, in Brent Sumerlin: Searching for a sweet response.

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Introducing new Associate Editor Professor Bin Liu

We are very pleased to announce a new addition to the Polymer Chemistry Editorial Board: Professor Bin Liu will join the team as an Associate Editor from the beginning of February 2014.

Bin Liu received a B.S. degree from Nanjing University and a Ph.D. from the National University of Singapore (NUS) before her postdoctoral training at the University of California at Santa Barbara. She joined the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department of NUS in 2005. She was promoted to associate Professor in 2010 and was named as Dean’s Chair Professor in 2014. She has received several awards, including the National Science and Technology Young Scientist Award 2008 and L’Oreal Woman in Science National Fellowship 2011. Her current research focuses on conjugated polymers and organic nanoparticles for sensing, imaging, therapy and optoelectronic device applications.

Bin Liu’s recent papers include:

A water-soluble conjugated polymer brush with multihydroxy dendritic side chains
Li Zhou, Junlong Geng, Guan Wang, Jie Liu and Bin Liu 
Polym. Chem., 2013, 4, 5243-5251 DOI: 10.1039/C3PY21080D

Bright far-red/near-infrared fluorescent conjugated polymer nanoparticles for targeted imaging of HER2-positive cancer cells
Jie Liu, Guangxue Feng, Dan Ding and Bin Liu 
Polym. Chem., 2013, 4, 4326-4334 DOI: 10.1039/C3PY00605K

Single molecular hyperbranched nanoprobes for fluorescence and magnetic resonance dual modal imaging
Jie Liu, Kai Li, Junlong Geng, Li Zhou, Prashant Chandrasekharan, Chang-Tong Yang and Bin Liu 
Polym. Chem., 2013, 4, 1517-1524 DOI: 10.1039/C2PY20837G

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