Archive for February, 2012

Top 10 most-read Polymer Chemistry articles in January

This month sees the following articles in Polymer Chemistry that are in the top ten most accessed for January:

Synthesis of biodegradable polymers from renewable resources 
Mathieu J.-L. Tschan ,  Emilie Brulé ,  Pierre Haquette and Christophe M. Thomas  
Polym. Chem., 2012, Advance Article 
DOI: 10.1039/C2PY00452F 

Thiol-ene “click” reactions and recent applications in polymer and materials synthesis
Andrew B. Lowe  
Polym. Chem., 2010, 1, 17-36 
DOI: 10.1039/B9PY00216B 

Naphtho[1,2-b:5,6-b‘]dithiophene-based conjugated polymer as a new electron donor for bulk heterojunction organic solar cells 
Pranabesh Dutta ,  Hanok Park ,  Woo-Hyung Lee ,  Kyuri Kim ,  In Nam Kang and Soo-Hyoung Lee  
Polym. Chem., 2012, 3, 601-604 
DOI: 10.1039/C2PY00424K 

Organoboron star polymers via arm-first RAFT polymerization: synthesis, luminescent behavior, and aqueous self-assembly 
Fei Cheng ,  Edward M. Bonder ,  Ami Doshi and Frieder Jäkle  
Polym. Chem., 2012, 3, 596-600 
DOI: 10.1039/C2PY00556E 

N-Heterocyclic carbene-catalysed synthesis of polyurethanes 
Olivier Coutelier ,  Mohammad El Ezzi , Mathias Destarac ,  Fabien Bonnette ,  Tsuyoshi Kato ,  Antoine Baceiredo ,  Gopakumar Sivasankarapillai ,  Yves Gnanou and Daniel Taton 
Polym. Chem., 2012, 3, 605-608 
DOI: 10.1039/C2PY00477A 

One-pot synthesis of amphiphilic reversible photoswitchable fluorescent nanoparticles and their fluorescence modulation properties
Jian Chen ,  Peisheng Zhang ,  Gang Fang ,  Chao Weng ,  Jia Hu ,  Pinggui Yi ,  Xianyong Yu and Xiaofang Li
Polym. Chem., 2012, 3, 685-693 
DOI: 10.1039/C2PY00525E 

Self-assembled amino acids and dipeptides as noncovalent hydrogels for tissue engineering
 
Derek M. Ryan and Bradley L. Nilsson  
Polym. Chem., 2012, 3, 18-33 
DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00335F 

Conjugated polymer nanostructures for organic solar cell applications
 
Jiun-Tai Chen and Chain-Shu Hsu  
Polym. Chem., 2011, 2, 2707-2722 
DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00275A 

Branching out with aminals: microporous organic polymers from difunctional monomers
 
Andrea Laybourn ,  Robert Dawson ,  Rob Clowes ,  Jonathan A. Iggo ,  Andrew I. Cooper ,  Yaroslav Z. Khimyak and Dave J. Adams  
Polym. Chem., 2012, 3, 533-537 
DOI: 10.1039/C2PY00506A 

Hydrogen bonding of helical vinyl polymers containing alanine moieties: a stabilized interaction of helical conformation sensitive to solvents and pH
 
Zhiguo Zhu ,  Jiaxi Cui ,  Jie Zhang and Xinhua Wan  
Polym. Chem., 2012, 3, 668-678 
DOI: 10.1039/C2PY00492E 

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Polymer Chemistry? Then why not submit to us today!

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Polymer Chemistry Author of the Week: Eva Harth

Eva Harth studied chemistry at the University of Bonn, Germany, and the University of Zurich, Switzerland. In 1998 she obtained her PhD for work in the area of fullerene adducts and polymers from the MPI for Polymer Research.  A postdoctoral fellowship with CPIMA (NSF-Center for Polymer Interfaces and Macromolecular Assemblies) brought her to the IBM Almaden Research Center, California USA, to work under the direction of Prof. Craig J. Hawker. In 2001 she joined XenoPort, Inc. as a Staff Scientist investigating enabling technologies for the increased bioavailability of macromolecular therapeutics and took a position as Assistant Professor at Vanderbilt University in the Department of Chemistry in 2004 with a secondary appointment in the department of Pharmacology. In 2011 she was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure and is member of the Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center (VICC), Institute of Chemical Biology (VICB) and the Institute of Nanoscale Science and Engineering(VINSE). She is serving on the Editorial Board of Polymer Chemistry since its start in 2009 and is one of its Associate Editors. As advisory editorial board member she is active for ACS MacroLetters, Macromolecules and as associate editorial board member for the American Journal of Cancer Research. The focus of her research advances delivery technologies across challenging biological barriers and towards highly vascular tumors.

 

Please follow the link for further information on Eva’s research group and her recent paper published in Polymer Chemistry.

What was your inspiration in becoming a chemist?

I liked to find out how biological processes work and then I started to like the fact that I could make a real product with my hands and enjoyed bench work.  Chemistry is so versatile and affects so many areas in life and provides hopefully the better solution to an existing problem.  My current work focuses on questions in the biomedical field; I appreciate to know about the clinical challenges through collaborators and being in an inspiring environment. I think it is about what questions and challenges you want to pick as a chemist and that you have means to go after them in many different ways; this is the most exciting part.

What was the motivation behind the research in your recent Polymer Chemistry paper?

It is an extension of a paper that we have published in 2007 describing intramolecular chain crosslinkers other than benzocyclobutenes because they have been notoriously difficult to make.  The clean reaction of these derivatives was always attractive to build nanoscopic materials, going back to the work of Craig Hawker and Bob Miller at IBM. In the current paper we describe a low temperature version that might be useful to engage these benzocyclobutene units to a broader application. Although, at the moment the majority of my work is directed to find practical chemistries to utilize cross-linking reactions to prepare controlled macromolecular networks involving a multitude of chains. We found that these structures “nanosponges” have beneficial properties to solubilize but also release drug molecules based on the applied crosslinking conditions with striking effects in vivo.

Why did you choose Polymer Chemistry to publish your work?

It has a large readership in Europe and the US and wanted to place it where it is likely to be read by a very diverse audience like it is known from RSC journals. Of course, I find it to be a wonderful journal and I am glad that it found very quickly a large acceptance in the field and that authors really send their best work.

In which upcoming conferences may our readers meet you?

I will attend both ACS meetings, for the first time I will participate in the AACR conference in Chicago in April. In May, I am in Rostock, Germany, and give a talk at the implants and biomaterials conference, then Warwick 2012, where the impact factor of Polymer Chemistry will be announced (!) and later in the year, the ACN Nanomedicine conference in Sydney and the Nanotech conference in CA. Two Zing Conferences in November, one of them will be a Polymer Chemistry conference focused on materials for biomedical and energy applications which will be a great conference bridging the fastest developing areas of polymer research.

How do you spend your spare times?

I started last year to get my private pilot license and I hope that I can have my first solo this year. Tennessee has these little airports all over the place and the countryside is beautiful, perfect to see it from the air and fly (in a Cessna) to cute places.

Which profession would you chose if you were not a scientist?

I would work in an auction house, as art dealer or architect. It is a great joy for me to find and collect pieces of young artists. All my family is working in construction and interior design and I could always relate to it.

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Themed Issue on Supramolecular and Dynamic Covalent Polymers: Call for Papers

We are delighted to announce a high-profile themed issue on Supramolecular and Dynamic Covalent Polymers to be published in 2012. The Guest Editors of the issue are Professor Neil Ayres (University of Cincinnati, USA) and Professor Marcus Weck (New York University, USA) and it is our pleasure to invite you to submit to this themed issue.

The themed issue will focus on supramolecular and dynamic covalent polymers, encompassing all aspects of the synthesis, characterization, and applications of these macromolecular systems.  Our objectives are not only to highlight current advances within this burgeoning field, but also to demonstrate how supramolecular and dynamic covalent polymers are being positioned at the intersection of diverse scientific arenas and stimulate different subsections of chemistry including synthetic organic chemistry, physical chemistry, and materials science.  We encourage our authors to promote how their novel chemistries can aid in areas ranging from understanding fundamental molecular properties to the creation of new soft materials and stimuli responsive assemblies.  It is our goal to bring together the preeminent scientists in this area to illuminate the leading edge of supramolecular and dynamic covalent polymer research and to demonstrate the potential for rapid future expansion into credible functional applications. 

The deadline for the receipt of manuscripts for this themed issue is: 2nd May 2012

Submissions, either communications or full papers, should be high-quality manuscripts of original, unpublished research, containing important new insight. All submissions will be subject to rigorous peer review to meet the usual high standards of Polymer Chemistry.

Manuscripts can be submitted using our online submission service. Please indicate on you submission letter that your manuscript is submitted in response to the call for papers for the Themed Issue on Supramolecular and Dynamic Covalent Polymers.

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Conference: 9th International Symposium on Polymer Therapeutics: From Lab to Clinic, 28th-30th May 2012

Conference Scope:

Polymer Therapeutics are amongst the most successful first generation “Nanomedicines”. A growing number of products have been approved by Regulatory Authorities for routine clinical use and others are progressing through clinical trials as single agents or as components of combination therapy regimes.

Polymer Therapeutics include inherently biologically active polymeric drugs and polymeric sequestrants, polymer-protein and polymer-drug conjugates, block copolymer micelles, and the supramolecular assemblies that form multi-component polyplexes designed to promote cytosolic delivery of genes, siRNAs and proteins.

Ever more sophisticated synthetic chemistry is leading to complex three dimensional polymeric architectures, including dendrimers, dendronised polymers and self-assembling nano-sized particles. Many polymeric carriers and hybrid polymer-coated systems are being developed as imaging agents and theranostics.

As clinical applications broaden to include treatments for infectious and inflammatory diseases, tissue repair and regeneration, and diseases of the ageing population there has been growing interest in the use of biodegradable polymers that are more suited to use for chronic treatments.

Plenary Lectures:

  • Virgil Percec (Univ. Pennsylvania) • Dendrimers, dendrimersomes and other complex architectures with potential for drug delivery
  • Bernhards Ogutu (Kenya Medical Research Inst.) •The challenge of diseases of poverty in Africa
  • Scott E. McNeil (Nanotech Characterization Lab, NCI) • Challenges for the translation of advanced nanomedicines into clinical development
  • Michelle Bradbury (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center) • Development of Multimodal (including PET) Imaging platforms: Design, Evaluation and Translation from Lab to Clinic”

Please visit the conference website for additional information & registration:

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Conference: 3rd International Organic Excitonic Solar Cell (OESC2012)

The third international Organic Excitonic Solar Cell (OESC2012) conference will be held from the 3rd-7th September 2012. The organisers warmly invite you to join them at the Hyatt Coolum Resort on the beautiful Queensland Sunshine Coast, Australia, to present your latest results on ‘organic’ solar cells. The conference will include both Dye Sensitised and Solid-State Thin Film Solar Cells. The abstract submission deadline is 28 February 2012 and the organisers welcome presentations on:

  • Materials
  • Photophysics
  • Transport physics and interfacial phenomena
  • Morphology
  • Device architectures
  • Device Physics
  • Theory and computation
  • Progress towards large area devices
  • Encapsulation and device lifetimes
  • Stability and degradation processes

More information about the conference including information on speakers and registration details can be found on the conference website: www.opvaustralia.org

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Polymer Chemistry Paper of the Week: Facile glycosylation of dendrimers for eliciting specific cell-material interactions

Graphical abstract: Facile glycosylation of dendrimers for eliciting specific cell–material interactions

Glycan-protein interactions represent an important class of mechanisms underlying numerous biological and pathological events that include cell recognition, trafficking, signalling and infection. Glycodendrimers of tunable saccharide loading levels using different types and generations of dendritic substrates were prepared using thio-urea linkage and click chemistries. Luo et al report a general approach to synthesize saccharide modified dendrimers via direct conjugation of underivatized reducing saccharides to hydrazide functionalized dendrimers.

Facile glycosylation of dendrimers for eliciting specific cell-material interactions by Xiaopeng Liu, Jie Liu and Ying Luo Polym. Chem. 2012, 3, 310-313.

To keep up-to-date with all the latest research, sign up for the journal’s e-alerts or RSS feeds or follow Polymer Chemistry on Twitter or Facebook.

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Polymer Chemistry Author of the Week-Andrew I. Cooper

Andy Cooper obtained his Ph.D at the University of Nottingham in 1994 for the study of organometallic reaction mechanisms. He then held an 1851 Fellowship at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA, working on polymerization reactions and phase transfer processes in supercritical fluids (1995–1997). He next held a Ramsay Memorial Research Fellowship at the Melville Laboratory for Polymer Synthesis in Cambridge, working on heterogeneous polymerizations in supercritical CO2 (1997–1999). He joined the University of Liverpool in January 1999 as a Royal Society University Research Fellow, where he now holds a personal chair. He is the founding Director of the Centre for Materials Discovery (established in 2007) and was a cofounder of a spin-out company, IOTA NanoSolutions, in 2005. He was Head of Chemistry and then Head of the School of Physical Sciences in the period 2007–2011. In addition to research in polymer chemistry, he has interests in crystal engineering, colloid science, and chemical problems related to energy.

Please follow the link for further information on Andy’s research group and his recent paper published in Polymer Chemistry.

What was your inspiration in becoming a chemist?

The constant albeit small chance of discovering something really remarkable and important, this is what makes research so exciting.

 

What was the motivation behind the research in your recent Polymer Chemistry paper?

We published our first paper on conjugated microporous polymers (CMPs) in 2007 (Angew. Chem., Int. Ed., 2007, 46, 8574). There have been several nice follow-up studies since, but the most interesting have exploited the combination of extended conjugation and porosity in these materials. For example, one of the best papers in this area was published last year by Prof. Donglin Jiang (Angew. Chem., Int. Ed., 2011, 50, 8753) describing supercapacitive CMPs that rival nanocarbons. For these applications it will be important to control both porosity and also physical properties related to conjugation, such as optical band gap or charge mobility.  In this new study, we set out to synthesize triazine analogues of our first CMP materials. We found that the materials, while amorphous, were ‘isoreticular’ in the sense that changing from benzene to triazine nodes does not affect the microporosity.  The triazine CMPs, however, showed slightly higher CO2 uptakes and optical band gaps that can be varied by copolymerization.   Variation of band gap could be useful in applications like photocatalysis.  Prof. Wenbin Lin at UNC has shown that related materials are good photocatalysts.

 

Why did you choose Polymer Chemistry to publish your work?

I’ve found that the RSC journals have fast publication times and good editing and refereeing.  I’m sure Polymer Chemistry will not be an exception.

 

In which upcoming conferences may our readers meet you?

2012 ACS meetings (both Spring and Fall), Pott Shrigley, and of course Warwick 2012.

 

How do you spend your spare times?

I haven’t had time for ‘hobbies’ as such for years, but I did recently take up mountain biking.  Perhaps this signifies a mid-life crisis…

 

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

A stunt man.  You get to live in a trailer.

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