Archive for December, 2011

Conference Feedback: IPST2011, the International Polymer Conference meets in Bali, Indonesia

The Innovation in Polymer Science and Technology 2011 (IPST2011) was held in Bali, Indonesia on November 28 – December 1, 2011. The event was organised by Indonesian Polymer Association (HPI) under the auspices of Asian Polymer Association (APA).

Photograph of the attendees at The Innovation in Polymer Science and Technology 2011

The format consisted of workshop and micro‐symposium on Polymer in Biomedical and Pharmacy Applications, Conference and Exhibition. IPST2011 was attended by more than 200 participants from 16 countries, presenting about 160 paper works consist of 80 oral and 80 poster presentations, including 10 plenary speakers, 30 keynote and invited speakers.

Plenary lectures were delivered by Jöns Hilborn (Sweden), Didier Letourneur (France) and Der‐Jang Liaw (Taiwan) at the first day, while Kell Mortensen (Denmark), Atsushi Suzuki (Japan) and Anil Kumar Bhowmick (India) in the second day. Suminar S. Achmadi (Indonesia) and William H. Starnes Jr. (USA) presented their lectures at the third day. Finally, Markus Meyer (Germany) and Asmuwahyu Saptorahardjo (Indonesia) delivered the plenary lectures on industrial applications of polymers.

The Asian Polymer Association presented a 2011 APA award to Prof. Atsushi Suzuki of Yokohama National University, Japan. Meanwhile, HPI award for the 2011 was presented to Ms. Nursyamsu Bahar from Research Center of Pulp and Paper, Ministry of Industry of Republic of Indonesia, Bandung, Indonesia for her lifetime contributions in polymer research as well as in the polymer society in Indonesia.

The best student posters were awarded to 5 students: Mohamad R. Ishak (Malaysia), Khairanissa Muchlis (Indonesia), Teenakrishna Sehgal (India), Geu‐Bim Lee (Korea) and Tomoki Yoshida (Japan). Tomoki Yoshida was also honored the Polymer Chemistry Best Poster Prize. Shuntaro Tsubaki (Japan) and Paula S. Rudati (Indonesia) were awarded the best oral presentation prize.

The IPST2011 was officially closed by Mr. Sudirman who elected on HPI Congress in Bali and succeeded Mr. Sunit Hendrana as the chairman of Indonesian Polymer Association.

Report by Edy Giri Rachman Putra

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Congratulations to Tomoki Yoshida for winning a Polymer Chemistry poster prize

photo of Tomoki Yoshida with his winning posterCongratulations to Tomoki Yoshida for winning a Polymer Chemistry poster prize at the International Conference on the Innovation in Polymer Science and Technology 2011 (IPST2011). His winning poster titled “Extraction of Hemicelluloses from Corn Pericarp by the NaOH-Urea Solvent System” was selected by the judges and awarded by Edy Giri Rachman Putra.

Tomoki Yoshida is a PhD student working in the group of Professor J. Azuma, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Japan. IPST2011 was held in Bali, Indonesia, November 28 – December 1, 2011.

To keep up-to-date with all the latest research, sign up for the journal’s e-alerts or RSS feeds or follow Polymer Chemistry on Twitter or Facebook.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Top Ten most-read Polymer Chemistry articles in November

This month sees the following articles in Polymer Chemistry that are in the top ten most accessed for November:

Thiol-ene “click” reactions and recent applications in polymer and materials synthesis 
Andrew B. Lowe 
Polym. Chem., 2010, 1, 17-36 
DOI: 10.1039/B9PY00216B 

Conjugated polymer nanostructures for organic solar cell applications 
Jiun-Tai Chen and Chain-Shu Hsu 
Polym. Chem., 2011, 2, 2707-2722 
DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00275A 

Bioinspired dual self-folding of single polymer chains via reversible hydrogen bonding 
Ozcan Altintas, Elise Lejeune, Peter Gerstel and Christopher Barner-Kowollik 
Polym. Chem., 2012, Advance Article 
DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00392E 

An isoindigo and dithieno[3,2-b:2',3'-d]silole copolymer for polymer solar cells 
Romain Stalder, Caroline Grand, Jegadesan Subbiah, Franky So and John R. Reynolds 
Polym. Chem., 2012, 3, 89-92 
DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00402F 

A facile synthesis of clickable and acid-cleavable PEO for acid-degradable block copolymers 
Kotaro Satoh, Justin E. Poelma, Luis M. Campos, Brian Stahl and Craig J. Hawker 
Polym. Chem., 2012, Advance Article 
DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00484K 

Honeycomb structured polymer films via breath figures 
Maribel Hernández-Guerrero and Martina H. Stenzel 
Polym. Chem., 2012, Advance Article 
DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00219H 

Modular oxime functionalization of well-defined alkoxyamine-containing polymers 
Megan R. Hill, Soma Mukherjee, Philip J. Costanzo and Brent S. Sumerlin 
Polym. Chem., 2012, Advance Article 
DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00451D 

Fast and scalable production of hyperbranched polythioether-ynes by a combination of thiol-halogen click-like coupling and thiol-yne click polymerization 
Jin Han, Bo Zhao, Aijin Tang, Yanqin Gao and Chao Gao 
Polym. Chem., 2012, Advance Article 
DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00367D 

Controlled grafting of cellulose fibres – an outlook beyond paper and cardboard 
Eva Malmström and Anna Carlmark 
Polym. Chem., 2012, Advance Article 
DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00445J 

Diels-Alder “Click” Reactions: Recent Applications in Polymer and Material Science 
Mehmet Atilla Tasdelen 
Polym. Chem., 2011, 2, 2133-2145 
DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00041A 

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Polymer Chemistry? Then why not submit to us today!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Hot Article: Multi-block copolymer stars via an iterative radical polymerization technique. No purification required!

Graphical abstract: Synthesis of multi-block copolymer stars using a simple iterative Cu(0)-mediated radical polymerization techniqueA simple and efficient route to well-defined multi-block star copolymers has been developed by scientists at the University of New South Wales, Australia.

Based on copper(0)-mediated living radical polymerization, the method involves a core first approach using a multi-functional initiator in connection with iterative copper(0)-mediated radical polymerization steps. No purification is required between the successive chain extension steps as complete monomer conversion is reached before the addition of each consecutive monomer type.

Synthesis of multi-block copolymer stars using a simple iterative Cu(0)-mediated radical polymerization technique: Cyrille Boyer, Aurelia Derveaux, Per B. Zetterlund and Michael R. Whittaker, Polym. Chem., 2012, 3, 117-123

To keep up-to-date with all the latest research, sign up for the journal’s e-alerts or RSS feeds or follow Polymer Chemistry on Twitter or Facebook.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Conference feedback-Precision Polymer Materials (P2M)

1st Precision Polymer Materials (P2M) networking meeting was held in Strasbourg, France between December 11th and 14th. The conference was funded by the European Science Foundation (ESF) and chaired by Sebastien Lecommandoux. There were 94 attendees, who presented 34 lectures and 56 posters. The best 10 posters were selected and each presenter was awarded with 1000 euro by the ESF that they can spend towards the MRS meeting expenses in Boston, USA. The alphabetical list of the names and titles of the poster prize winners is as follows.

  • Elaboration of micellar gels based on metal-ligand interactions
    Jérémy Brassinne, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Belgium
  • Novel block copolymers for use in non-polar non-aqueous dispersion polymerisations: replacements for poly(hydroxystearic acid)-g-poly(methyl methacrylate)
    Kate Belsey, University of Kent, United Kingdom
  • Polymeric Vesicles with Dynamically Controlled Surfaces
    René Brinkhuis, Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands
  • Polylactide stereocomplexes based on modified carbon nanotubes
    M. Brzezinski,Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland
  • Double modified polymers based on polythiol formation and thiol-ene reactions
    Fabienne Goethals, Ghent University, Belgium
  • Controlling inorganic crystallization by organized polymer films
    Agnieszka Jagoda, University of Basel, Switzerland
  • Polymer vesicles: Biomimetism and membrane properties
    Maïté Marguet, Universite de Bordeaux, France
  • Synthesis of Sequence-Defined Oligopeptide-Polymer Conjugates via Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization
    Anna Meszynska, University of Strasbourg, France
  • Selective Adsorbents for Nucleobases and Nucleobase-Containing Compounds
    Anna Plewa, University of Krakow, Poland
  • Smart Polymeric Sensors
    Gertjan Vancoillie, Ghent University, Belgium

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Polymer Chemistry Author of the Week-Levent Demirel

A. Levent Demirel received his B.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering & Physics from Boğaziçi University, Istanbul, in 1989, and Ph.D. degree in Physics from University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA in 1996. He was postdoctoral researcher at FOM Institute AMOLF in Amsterdam in 1996-1997. He joined Koç University Chemistry Department as faculty member in 1997 where he was promoted to full professor in 2008. Currently, he is the Associate Dean of College of Sciences. He has received TÜBİTAK (Turkish Scientific and Technical Research Council) Young Scientist Award in 1999, TÜBA (Turkish Academy of Sciences) Young Scientist Award in 2001 and Koç University Werner von Siemens Excellence Award in 2003. In 2006, he has been elected as associate member of Turkish Academy of Sciences. His current research interests are in the field of surface and polymer physical chemistry.

Please follow the link for further information on Levent’s research group and his recent paper published in Polymer Chemistry.

What was your inspiration in becoming a chemist?

 

Though my current research is in the field of physical chemistry, I am a physicist by training. I will be happy as long as I stay in science as a major, whether it is physics or chemistry. I was fond of numbers, calculations and equations as a kid. My aunt was a primary school teacher at a village. When I was about 5 years old, I attended her classes for a while where I met numbers and calculations first time. Then at the high school I had very inspiring physics, chemistry and math teachers. I started as an electrical engineering undergraduate, but my desire to understand single transistor dominated over analyzing complex electronic circuits and I went for PhD in Physics at University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. I later switched to soft matter physics, by chance, and worked under the supervision of Prof. Steve Granick on viscoelasticity of molecularly thin liquid films. Then at postdoc, I worked on thin films of liquid crystals and block copolymers. There is a lot overlapping in physics and chemistry when you work on soft matter and I naturally moved into the field of physical chemistry after starting as a faculty member at Koç University Chemistry Department.

What was the motivation behind the research in your recent Polymer Chemistry paper? (DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00463H)

The question we are after is quite fundamental and practical: Why are initially clear homogeneous polymer solutions not stable in time and agglomerates formed? Chemists do not like it when chemicals can not be dissolved in a solvent for further analysis or processing, but frequently encounter it in the lab especially with macromolecules. The change in temperature, pH may trigger such irreversible agglomeration among other reasons. Poly(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline) was known to form irreversible crystalline fibers when kept above cloud point temperature for extended times. We expected the same for poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) (PEOX) as similar interactions are in charge, but could not observe any structure formation for a long time. My PhD student Pınar Tatar Güner was patient enough to wait long (several weeks) to observe that crystalline PEOX fibers are also formed. Then, we controlled this self-assembly process by electrolytes and characterized these fibers structurally.

Why did you choose Polymer Chemistry to publish your work?

As much as I can, I regularly check the contents of every new issue of the major journals in my field. Since its first issue in 2010, I found many high quality papers, very relevant to my research interests in every issue of Polymer Chemistry. It already had high impact on my research and I decided to send it to Polymer Chemistry.

In which upcoming conferences may our readers meet you?

I plan to attend to ACS Spring Meeting in San Diego, USA, in March 2012 where there will be a session on poly(2-oxazoline)s.

How do you spend your spare times?

My wife and I like travelling and spending time in nature.

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

I would choose a profession where I can spend more time out in the field – being a farmer, an archeologist, a field biologist, a geologist.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Make the most of the last few weeks of free access to Polymer Chemistry

Polymer Chemistry issue 2 front coverFree online access to Polymer Chemistry will cease at the start of 2012, but there is still time to take a look at all the articles we’ve published so far free of charge.

 

We hope you’ve enjoyed – and will continue to enjoy – reading the articles we publish. One of the highlights of the last year was the Emerging Investigators Issue with Rachel O’Reilly and Andrew Dove as the guest editors which gives a flavour of some of the most exciting research being discovered in these recently established labs.  Another highlight was the polymer bioconjugates themed issue front coverPolymer Bioconjugates themed issue guest edited by Jan van Hest and Brent Sumerlin which gives an overview of this exciting and fast developing area.

 

Don’t forget all the latest Advanced Articles are listed on the Polymer Chemistry home page and the most popular articles are shown on the Most Read Articles tab.

 

If you would like to continue to receive access to Polymer Chemistry in 2012 please recommend Polymer Chemistry to your librarian.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Hot Paper: Versatile synthesis of temperature-sensitive polypeptides by click grafting of oligo(ethylene glycol)

Graphical abstract: Versatile synthesis of temperature-sensitive polypeptides by click grafting of oligo(ethylene glycol)A series of thermoresponsive polymers suitable for releasing drugs from polymer nanoparticles have been created by a team at Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, China.

The team synthesised a series of thermoresponsive oligo(ethylene glycol)-grafted polypeptides that can self-assemble into amphiphilic nanoparticles in aqueous solution. These polymers show sharp temperature-dependent phase transitions and the lower critical solution temperature can be adjusted from 22.3 to 74.1 °C by varying the molecular weight, the length of the OEG side chain, the polymer concentration and salt concentration. The polymer nanoparticles are not toxic and the team demonstrated their drug release profiles using doxorubicin as a model drug.

Versatile synthesis of temperature-sensitive polypeptides by click grafting of oligo(ethylene glycol): Yilong Cheng, Chaoliang He, Chunsheng Xiao, Jianxun Ding, Xiuli Zhuang and Xuesi Chen, Polym. Chem., 2011, 2, 2627-2634

To keep up-to-date with all the latest research, sign up for the journal’s e-alerts or RSS feeds or follow Polymer Chemistry on Twitter or Facebook.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Polymer Chemistry Author of the Week – Masami Kamigaito

Masami Kamigaito was born in 1965 in Nagoya, Japan. He received his B.S. (1988), M.S. (1990), and Ph.D. (1993) in polymer chemistry from Kyoto University under the direction of Professor Toshinobu Higashimura. After conducting postdoctoral research with Professor Mitsuo Sawamoto, he joined the faculty of Kyoto University in 1995, where he was promoted to Associate Professor in 1999. In 2003, he moved to Nagoya University and worked as an Associate Professor with Professor Yoshio Okamoto. In 2004, he was promoted to Professor. From 1997–1998, he worked as a visiting scientist at Stanford University with Professor Robert M. Waymouth. He was the recipient of the 2001 Arthur K. Doolittle Award of the ACS PMSE Division, the 2009 Wiley Polymer Science Award of the Society of Polymer Science, Japan, and the 2010 Japan IBM Science Award (Chemistry). His research interests include controlled radical and cationic polymerizations, the development and application of new polymerizations to precision polymer synthesis, and controlled polymerizations of renewable vinyl monomers.

Please follow the link for further information on Masami’s research group and his recent paper in Polymer Chemistry.

 

What was your inspiration in becoming a chemist?

My family. I have always been interested in the natural sciences. My father studied Physics at the University, as did my elder brother. My preference for Chemistry in high school and my desire to choose a different field from that of my father and brother led me to study Chemistry at the University.

What was the motivation behind the research in your recent Polymer Chemistry paper? (DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00401H)

Our group has worked on controlling the molecular weight, stereochemistry, and monomer sequence in radical polymerization by designing polymerization systems, including monomers, initiators, catalysts, and additives. Since I collaborated with Professor Yoshio Okamoto and learned stereospecific radical polymerization, we began researching the simultaneous control of molecular weight and tacticity and its application for the synthesis of novel types of controlled polymers. The RAFT copolymerization of bulky methacrylate and methacrylic acid, which have different reactivities and stereoselectivities, permitted the synthesis of stereogradient polymers, in which the tacticity can be varied from syndiotacticity to isotacticity.

Why did you choose Polymer Chemistry to publish your work?

This paper was submitted to a themed issue of New Methods of Polymer Synthesis, which was guest-edited by Professors Christopher Barner-Kowollik, Jean-François Lutz, and Sebastien Perrier, in which many readers working in this field have a strong interest. In addition, Polymer Chemistry is becoming one of the most attractive journals in polymer chemistry, as evidenced by the quality of the papers published therein.

In which upcoming conferences may our readers meet you?

Most certainly, I will be attending the 9th Society of Polymer Science Japan International Conference (IPC2012) at Kobe in Japan from 11/12/2012 to 14/12/2012, which will be announced at http://www.spsj.or.jp/english-index.htm, because I am a member of the Program Committee.

How do you spend your spare times?

I play with my three (9, 7, and 3 years old) children.

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

Archeologist. It is another profession I wanted to choose, because I had experiences in finding flint implements when I was a child.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Hot Paper: Anionic polymeric ionic liquids with high charge delocalization

Graphical abstract: Design and synthesis of new anionic “polymeric ionic liquids” with high charge delocalizationA new family of polymeric ionic liquids could find use as materials for electrochemical devices.

The team led by A. S. Shaplov synthesised three ionic monomers with highly delocalized anions and mobile aprotic cations. These monomers were designed to mimic the structure of three highly conductive anions. A radical polymerization procedure was then used to form the polymeric ionic liquids. Interested to know more? Read the full article for free. 

Design and synthesis of new anionic “polymeric ionic liquids” with high charge delocalization: A. S. Shaplov, P. S. Vlasov, M. Armand, E. I. Lozinskaya, D. O. Ponkratov, I. A. Malyshkina, F. Vidal, O. V. Okatova, G. M. Pavlov, C. Wandrey, I. A. Godovikov and Y. S. Vygodskii, Polym. Chem., 2011, 2, 2609-2618

To keep up-to-date with all the latest research, sign up for the journal’s e-alerts or RSS feeds or follow Polymer Chemistry on Twitter or Facebook.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)