Archive for April, 2011

Top Ten most-read Polymer Chemistry articles in March

The latest top ten most downloaded Polymer Chemistry articles

See the most-read papers of March 2011 here:

George Pasparakis and Maria Vamvakaki, Polym. Chem., 2011, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C0PY00424C

Hongmei Li, Ming Li, Xiao Yu, Abhijeet P. Bapat and Brent S. Sumerlin, Polym. Chem., 2011, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00031D
 
Koon Gee Neoh and En Tang Kang, Polym. Chem., 2011, 2, 747-759
DOI: 10.1039/C0PY00266F
 
Haoyu Tang and Donghui Zhang, Polym. Chem., 2011, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00015B
 
Andrew B. Lowe, Polym. Chem., 2010, 1, 17-36
DOI: 10.1039/B9PY00216B
 
Abidin Balan, Derya Baran and Levent Toppare, Polym. Chem., 2011, 2, 1029-1043
DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00007A
 
Jacob G. Ray, Jack T. Ly and Daniel A. Savin, Polym. Chem., 2011, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00003A
 
Akira Hirao, Kota Murano, Toshiyuki Oie, Masahiro Uematsu, Raita Goseki and Yuri Matsuo, Polym. Chem., 2011, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C0PY00344A
 
Bo Liu, Yingping Zou, Bo Peng, Bin Zhao, Kelong Huang, Yuehui He and Chunyue Pan, Polym. Chem., 2011, 2, 1156-1162
DOI: 10.1039/C0PY00401D
 
Rong Fu and Guo-Dong Fu, Polym. Chem., 2011, 2, 465-475
DOI: 10.1039/C0PY00174K
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Polymer Chemistry Author of the Week – Didier Gigmes

Didier Gigmes got his education in chemistry at the University Paul Cezanne (Marseille, France). In 1998, he received his PhD in organic chemistry under the guidance of Prof. Paul Tordo (Marseille, France). He completed a first postdoctoral fellowship at Elf-Atochem, North America in Pennsylvania (USA) under the supervision of Dr. Gary Silverman. Then, he came back to France to work as a postdoctoral fellow under the supervision of Prof. Paul Tordo in Marseille. In 2001 he obtained a position of researcher at CNRS to develop nitroxide-mediated polymerization (NMP). In 2008 he defended his Habilitation at the University of Provence and became a group leader in June 2008. In October 2010, he was appointed Research Director at CNRS. During the past few years he has been working on the development of NMP and particularly the design of a highly efficient SG1-based alkoxyamine. After a significant contribution to the understanding of the mechanisms involved in NMP, one of his main concerns is now to promote NMP in material science for various applications such as biomaterials, environment and energy.

Please follow the link to get more information about Didier’s laboratory and his recent paper in Polymer Chemistry.

What was your inspiration in becoming a scientist?
During my education at the University I met two supervisors who strongly influenced my career choices. I can say that working and discussing with Pr. J.-P. Galy and Pr. P. Tordo made me realize the incredible scope of applications of chemistry and that being a scientist is extremely exciting and not so conventional a job.

What was the motivation behind the research in your recent Polymer Chemistry paper? (DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00057H)
I was investigating the potential of the radical reactivity of highly labile alkoxyamines. We discovered that by using this kind of compounds, we were able to perform particularly clean 1,2-intermolecular radical addition onto activated olefins. Then, we exploited this reactivity as an efficient, simple and versatile synthetic tool to prepare advanced polymer materials. I like when ideas are simple to set up.

Why did you choose Polymer Chemistry to publish your work?
I was immediately convinced when I heard about the launch of Polymer Chemistry journal. Obviously, the number of papers in science increases year after year, therefore having different high level journals that offer the possibility to publish scientific achievements of the community is mandatory. I really appreciate Polymer Chemistry for the quality of the contributions and also because it is really professional. The review and publication processes are particularly fast and efficient.

At which upcoming conferences may our readers meet you?
In 2011, I plan to attend the up-coming polymer conference in Granada at European Polymer Congress in July and the ACS Meeting in Denver end August.

How do you spend your spare time?
My spare time is devoted to sport. Playing tennis with my daughters and cycling alone or with friends. It’s good for the shape and also for the mind.

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?
I think I would have wanted to become a physician. This is probably why I’m very interested in research studies dealing with the synthesis and the use of polymer materials designed for biomedical applications.

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Conference: American Chemical Society National Meeting – Fall 2011

The 242nd National Meeting of American Chemical Society Conference will be held in Denver, CO on August 28th-September 1st. There will be several sessions running in parallel. The sessions that are organized by POLY are advances in polymer composites, aerospace applications of polymers, biomimetic polymers, fluorine containing polymers, controlled radical polymerization, metal containing and metallo-supramolecular polymers and materials, pi-conjugated polymers, polymer coatings for the enviroment, energy and sustainability, and polymers in water purification. In this meeting PMSE division is focusing on the dynamics of nanostructures polymers, function through macromolecular assembly, PET recycling, and porous polymers.

The abstract submissions for these sessions are already over, but the registration will continue until the meeting date. Further details on the meeting can be found on the ACS website and you can access more information by following this link.

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Polymer Chemistry Author of the Week – Kris Matyjaszewski

Krzysztof (Kris) Matyjaszewski received his PhD degree in 1976 at the Polish Academy of Sciences under Prof. S. Penczek.  Since 1985 he has been at Carnegie Mellon University where he is currently J. C. Warner University Professor of Natural Sciences and director of Center for Macromolecular Engineering. He is also Adjunct Professor at the University of Pittsburgh and at the Polish Academy of Sciences. Kris is the editor of Progress in Polymer Science and Central European Journal of Chemistry. His publications have been cited over 42,000 times. His research interests include controlled/living radical polymerization, catalysis, environmental chemistry, and advanced materials for optoelectronic and biomedical applications.

Please follow the link to get more information about Kris’ research group and his recent paper in Polymer Chemistry.

What was your inspiration in becoming a chemist?
Chemistry is a central science that bridges efficiently with many other disciplines. Perhaps the most exciting is its molecular aspect  enabling creation of new compounds and new matter.

What was the motivation behind the research in your recent Polymer Chemistry paper? (DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00050K)
Controlled radical polymerization, including ATRP, allows chemists to link well-defined synthetic polymers with inorganics but also with natural products. Using genetically modified GFP with ATRP initiating sites and entrapping it inside nanogels is a continuation of collaboration with Ryan Mehl’s group and was spearheaded by Saadyah Averick, a talented graduate student.

Why did you choose Polymer Chemistry to publish your work?
We were invited to contribute to a special issue in this new interesting journal.

At which upcoming conferences may our readers meet you?
European Polymer Federation Meeting in Granada in June 2011.
Together with Brent Sumerlin and Nick Tsarevsky, we are organizing the 6th Controlled Radical Polymerization in Denver in late August 2011.

How do you spend your spare times?
I wish I will have some spare time…

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Polymer Chemistry Author of the Week-Andre Laschewsky

André Laschewsky has been a professor for Macromolecular Science in the University of Potsdam since 2001. His main research interests can be listed as synthesis and characterization of novel functional monomers and polymers, polymers in aqueous media, self-organization of polymers and functionalization of the assemblies formed, biomimicking by polymer and surfactant systems, correlation of molecular architecture, supramolecular structure and macroscopic properties of polymers. Please follow the link to get more information about Andre’s research group and his recent paper in Polymer Chemistry.

What was your inspiration in becoming a chemist?
The possibility to create my own personal and unique objects of research, as well as the combination of practical work in the laboratory together with a rigid logical approach to understand what I do and provoke.

What was the motivation behind the research in your recent Polymer Chemistry paper? (DOI: 10.1039/c1py00001b)
We wanted to show that localized supramolecular interactions can modify key properties of functional macromolecules as a whole, though most molecular fragments seem “independent” and are not involved in the interaction.

Why did you choose Polymer Chemistry to publish your work?
Though the journal is very new, I like it very much and enjoyed reading every issue so far. I find it to be the journal with the most creative contributions to polymer synthesis at present.

In which upcoming conferences may our readers meet you?
- Smart Polymer Systems Conference, 25-26 May 2011at Mainz (Germany)
- 25th European Colloid and Interface Society Conference, Berlin Sept. 4-9 sept 2011 at Berlin (Germany)
- 7th European Detergents Conference (EDC), 14-16 oct 2011 at Fulda (Germany)

How do you spend your spare time?
With my family, reading, hiking

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?
I cannot imagine that.

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Polymer Chemistry Author of the Week – Franck D’Agosto

Franck D’Agosto studied chemistry at the Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie in Mulhouse (France). He completed a PhD in Polymer Chemistry at the joint unit between CNRS and bioMérieux (University of Lyon, France) before working at the University of Sydney (Australia) as a postdoctoral fellow in the Key Center for Polymer Colloids. Since 2002, he has been a researcher at the CNRS in the Chemistry and Process of Polymerization Team in C2P2 laboratory (Lyon, France). His research interests focus on the control of polymer architectures by the use of different polymerization chemistries – such as catalytic and controlled free radical polymerizations – either performed in solution or in dispersed media.

Please follow the link for further information on Franck’s recent paper in Polymer Chemistry.

What was your inspiration in becoming a chemist?
Becoming a Chemist was not really what I always dreamt of being. Still I reckon that I always enjoyed fixing things or finding the way to fix them. Has playing with macromolecular architectures and polymerization techniques anything to do with this? Maybe. But I remember that I really got into the polymer world after listening to Prof. G. Riess at the University who was the first to teach me (and grab my attention with) how to make macromolecules and what they were useful for.

What was the motivation behind the research in your recent Polymer Chemistry paper? (DOI: 10.1039/C0PY00237B)
Our group has a great experience in the field of polymer colloids and as a part of my research I am trying to take advantage of well defined polymer chains in this area. Together with Dr. Muriel Lansalot, who has a strong background in miniemulsion polymerization, we were wondering if a well defined hydrophilic polymer chain alone could play multiple roles in a miniemulsion polymerization system. In the current paper, this chain is a stabilizing agent for the monomer droplets, a surfactant precursor and a control agent for the growth of the hydrophobic chains.

Why did you choose Polymer Chemistry to publish your work?
I knew this Journal from its launch as Dave Haddleton invited me to write a review on the polyethylene functionalization work we have been doing in the group (another part of my research activities). I had already experienced the submission process which was perfect. But I reckon that the trust you can put in a new journal is really dependant upon the trust you have in the editors and the editorial board and I was really confident with that. Besides, I was amazed by the name “Polymer Chemistry” and the fact that no other journal in Polymer Science had already chosen it. I like the way the people who chose that name were thinking!

In which upcoming conferences may our readers meet you?
I will be attending the second Edition of the Frontiers in Polymer Science conference in Lyon in May, without being jetlagged. Then I’ll be mostly travelling in the US attending the International Polymer Colloid Group conference in Durham in June, and the ACS Meetings in Denver in August and Sonoma in September.

How do you spend your spare time?
Spare time? I have three children… but that’s quality time.

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?
I don’t know. Maybe something around travelling, food and wine.

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