Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Outstanding Reviewers for Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences in 2016

Following the success of Peer Review Week in September 2016 (dedicated to reviewer recognition) during which we published a list of our top reviewers, we are delighted to announce that we will continue to recognise the contribution that our reviewers make to the journal by announcing our Outstanding Reviewers each year.

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences in 2016, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Professor Adelaide Almeida, University of Aveiro
Dr Ross Boyle, University of Hull
Dr Frank de Gruijl, Leiden University Medical School
Dr Thierry Douki, CEA-Grenoble
Dr Axel Griesbeck, University of Cologne
Dr Asta Juzeniene, Oslo University Hospital
Dr Uwe Pischel, University of Huelva
Professor Eric Vauthey, University of Geneva
Professor Rene Williams, Universiteit van Amsterdam

We would also like to thank the Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences board and the Inorganic community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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Research Award of the Jörg Wolff Foundation: Arnold Rikli Award 2016

For photobiological investigations in relation to human beings, we hereby announce the awarding of the

17. Arnold Rikli Prize

in the amount of 10.000,– Euro for the year 2016.

The prize was originally awarded by the Institute F. Wolff of Riehen, Switzerland and first established in 1989. Jörg Wolff, the brother of the former sponsor, contin-ues this tradition and the price is announced by the Jörg Wolff foundation every year since 2006.

The submitted reports should cover investigations on biological effects of optical ra-diation (ultraviolet, visible, and infrared radiation). The results should show new as-pects for diagnostic investigation and/or therapy or provide guidelines for the practi-cal utilization of biologic basics and/or future research with optical radiation.

Unpublished papers, or papers published after January 1, 2014, must be submitted in English or German language and be delivered to the office address mentioned below not later than February 28, 2017 (two copies required). The submission should focus on one area of speciality. An additional abstract of no more than 300 words should outline the research and the significance of it. In case that the sub-mission is “in cumulo“ (five studies at most) a brief explanation should be provided uniting the presentations together. It is desirable to enclose a letter of support for the award nomination.

An independent jury will evaluate the investigations and nominate the winner. The presentation of the award will take place at the Symposium “Biologic Effects of Light”, June 21 to 23, 2017 in Homburg/Saar (Germany).

Office address:

Dr. Peter Bocionek
c/o JW Holding GmbH
Kölner Straße 8
D-70376 Stuttgart
Germany

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Major society chemistry publishers jointly commit to integration with ORCID

ORCID provides an identifier for individuals to use with their name as they engage in research, scholarship and innovation activities, ensuring authors gain full credit for their work.

Today, we signed their open letter, along with ACS Publications, committing to unambiguous identification of all authors that publish in our journals.

The official press release can be read here.

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Highlighted PPS articles

The influence of Pluronics® on dark cytotoxicity, photocytotoxicity, localization and uptake of curcumin in cancer cells: studies of curcumin and curcuminoids XLIX.
Ravinder Singh, Hanne Hjorth Tønnesen, Solveig Kristensen and Kristian Berg
Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2013, 12, 559-575

Formulation by amphiphilic copolymers, e.g. nonionic Pluronics®, that spontaneously form nanoparticulate micellar carriers (10-100 nm) in aqueous media is one possible strategy to solubilize lipophilic photosensitizers and improve bioavailability, as investigated in this paper by in vitro cellular studies. Pluronics consist of hydrophilic poly-ethylene oxide (EO) and hydrophobic poly-propylene oxide (PO) blocks arranged in a sequential manner (Figure 1).

Pluronic block copolymers

Figure 1. Pluronic block copolymers, x = number of ethylene oxide groups (EO), y = number of propylene oxide groups (PO).

Pluronics form micelles with a hydrophobic core and hydrophilic corona when individual polymer chains spontaneously assemble into nanosized aggregates above a certain concentration (critical micelle concentration, cmc) and temperature (critical micelle temperature, cmt). The self-assembly of amphiphilic polymers is a reversible process. However, owing to a prolonged in vivo circulation time prior to dissociation, a high solubilizing capability and low toxicity, several Pluronics are approved for oral or intravenous administration, e.g. by the US Food and Drug Administration.

Kristian Berg and team

From left to right: Ravinder Singh, Hanne Hjorth Tønnesen, Solveig Kristensen and Kristian Berg

The Pluronic block composition will influence polymeric lipophilicity, micellar aggregation number, shape and size, cmc and cmt values, drug loading and localization, and the release of drug from the formulation. A proper selection of the polymeric blocks may enable development of optimized drug formulations with enhanced accumulation of the selected photosensitizer in cancer cells, as studied in this paper by formulation of the highly lipophilic photosensitizer Curcumin with selected Pluronics.

The field of pluronics has excited much interest lately, not least for the potential of these interesting polymers to assist in targeting cancer calls. The paper described above is an excellent example of how “pluronics” can be applied to improve targeting of photosensitisers in to cells and was one of the most accessed PPS articles on the Royal Society of Chemistry’s website last year.

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Ozone depletion and climate change

On behalf of Professor Rex M. Tyrrell, Editor-in-Chief

Under the terms of the Montreal Protocol on protection of the ozone layer, regular assessments of the state of knowledge in this area are required by the signatory parties. The paper “Ozone depletion and climate change: impacts on UV radiation” by McKenzie and co-workers is part of one such assessment which was provided to the United Nations Environmental Panel (UNEP) through their Environmental Effects Assessment Panel (EEAP).

UV index over time

Change in the annual mean of noon-time clear-sky erythemally-weighted UV, 1960-2100, relative to the level in 1980.

The EEAP reports on the Environmental Impacts of Ozone Depletion and, in their more recent assessment, have been asked to comment on any interactions between ozone depletion and the climate change. In an attempt to make these assessments more accessible to the wider scientific community, they are also published in the peer reviewed scientific literature. Both the last two major assessments (2006 and 2010) and several interim reports of the EEAP have been published in Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences.

The paper by McKenzie et al. is essentially the first chapter of the most recent full assessment in 2010. That chapter assesses our progress towards understanding atmospheric research relevant to the effects of ozone depletion and climate change on solar UV radiation. It provides a link between (a) the more detailed and technical WMO/UNEP report on the Science of Ozone Depletion, and (b) the subsequent chapters of the EEAP assessment that report on the environmental effects on human health, the terrestrial environment, the aquatic environment, biogeochemical cycles, air quality, and material damage.

EEAP Panel

L. O. Björn, S. Madronich, R. L. McKenzie, A. F. Bais, P. J. Aucamp (M. Ilyas was absent, shown right). The photo was taken at the UNEP meeting in Zhengzhou China in August 2014 while working on the 2014 Assessment for which A. Bais will be the lead author.

These latter chapters are also published in the same special issue of Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences. Although not designed as a review, the chapter nevertheless provides a digestible short summary of important research results on the subjects of ozone depletion, UV radiation, and interactions between these issues and climate change that have appeared in the literature in the four years since the previous assessment.

Therefore, in addition to the primary purpose of providing an assessment for policymakers, the article also provides a useful introduction to the subject, especially for researchers new to the field and to educators. The scope is unique, as it provides a one-stop update of these diverse, yet interrelated issues. It is written in a style that makes it accessible to the general public without detailed knowledge of the issues.

As the topic is of wide interest to the scientific community, this 2011 article published in Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences is one of the most highly cited in the journal from recent years. The 2014 assessment is currently under review, and will be published in a special issue of Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences in early 2015.

Read the full paper to find out more:

Ozone depletion and climate change: impacts on UV radiation
R. L. McKenzie, P. J. Aucamp, A. F. Bais, L. O. Björn, M. Ilyas and S. Madronich
Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2011, 10, 182-198.

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Unravelling UVA-induced mutagenesis

UVB is the portion of the solar spectrum that is absorbed by DNA. It is a major contributor to the biological effect of sunlight, a property that has been known since the early 19th century. The genotoxic effects of UVA have attracted comparatively little interest however research into this portion of the solar spectrum has been revisited in the last twenty years.

Authors

The Sage group. Back (L–R): Pierre-Marie Girard (CNRS researcher), Sylvain Martineau (engineer), Ludovic Tessier (technician) Front : Angela Bellini (PhD student) and Ev Sage

There has been an intense effort to understand how UVA radiation damages DNA, induces mutations and is involved in human skin carcinogenesis. A classic Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences Perspective by Sage and co-workers summarizes the main results of such investigations.

The article highlights unresolved issues in the field and discusses the more controversial data in the recent literature. In particular, the authors summarise the evidence that the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, the major DNA damage induced by UVA in mammalian cells, is caused by direct DNA-absorption of UVA photons rather than photosensitized reactions. This research is of particularly great importance for considering approaches to photoprotection.

Mutagenesis

Although contradictory data on UVA mutagenesis has been reported in the literature, the authors offer a critical analysis of the key findings and conclude that the main mutations induced by UVA are C to T transitions at bipyrimidine sites – the same process as for UVB. The authors propose that such a mutational specificity is a general UV signature, regardless of whether the UV radiation in question is UVB or UVA. This raises the question of what are the causative wavelengths when such mutations are observed in skin tumours.

The review also presents new insights on the genotoxic effects of UVA and provides a better understanding of the relative contribution of UVA to skin carcinogenesis, a crucial issue considering exposure of the human population to UVA radiation is unavoidable. The review presents mechanistic arguments that complement epidemiological studies on the risk of melanoma associated with the use of tanning beds, which emit over 99% UVA, and provides a platform for raising new questions on the potential effects of UVA radiation.

Since its publication in 2012, the Perspective has attracted considerable attention from researchers in the field, as evidenced by a growing number of citations.

To find out more, read the full article, which is free to access for 4 weeks:

Unravelling UVA-induced mutagenesis
Evelyne Sage, Pierre-Marie Girard and Stefania Francesconi
Photochem. Photobiol. Sci.,2012, 11, 74-80

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Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences impact factor increases to 2.9

We are delighted to announce that PPS has received its highest ever impact factor* of 2.9!

This achievement would not have been possible without the contribution of all our authors, referees, readers and Board members: thank you, we are very grateful for your support.

PPS continues to publish the latest developments in photochemistry and photobiology and encourages a synergism between these two important research areas.

We invite you to submit your latest research to PPS

Keep up-to-date with the latest content in Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences by registering for our free table of contents alerts.

Read more about the 2012 Impact Factors on the RSC Publishing Blog.

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. Data based on 2012 Journal Citation Reports®, (Thomson Reuters, 2013).

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PPS issue 4 is now published online – Solar Chemistry & Photocatalysis: Environmental Applications

The latest issue of PPS is now available to read online!  This month’s issue is a themed issue of contributions from the 7th European Meeting on Solar Chemistry & Photocatalysis: Environmental Applications (SPEA 7), held in Porto from 17th to 20th June 2012.  Read the Editorial by Guest Editors Joaquim Faria and Sixto Malato here.

PPS issue 4, 2013, front coverThe front cover highlights work by Roland Marschall and co-workers from Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany.  They developed barium tantalate composites which showed enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen generation.  After preparing (111)-layered Ba5Ta4O15photocatalysts via a solid-state reaction route and a citrate synthesis route, X-ray powder diffraction and absorption spectroscopy determined the presence of a second phase – Ba3Ta5O15.  The Ba5Ta4O15/Ba3Ta5O15 composites demonstrated up to 160% higher hydrogen evolution rates than for pure Ba5Ta4O15.  In addition, only very small amounts of Rh co-catalyst (0.025%) were needed to achieve these results.

Read the full article for free for 6 weeks!

Enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen generation from barium tantalate composites, Roland Marschall, Julia Soldat and Michael Wark, Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2013, 12, 671-677

Stay up-to-date with the latest developments from Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences by signing up for free table of contents alerts.

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Top 10 most accessed articles in 2012

Do you want to know what your colleagues were reading during 2012?  The following articles in Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences were the most accessed over the course of the year:

UV-induced DNA damage and repair: a review
Rajeshwar P. Sinha and Donat-P. Häder
Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2002,1, 225-236
DOI: 10.1039/B201230H, Perspective

Photoinduced formation of reversible dye radicals and their impact on super-resolution imaging
Sebastian van de Linde, Ivan Krstić, Thomas Prisner, Sören Doose, Mike Heilemann and Markus Sauer
Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2011,10, 499-506
DOI: 10.1039/C0PP00317D, Paper

Photo-oxidation of proteins
David I. Pattison, Aldwin Suryo Rahmanto and Michael J. Davies
Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2012,11, 38-53
DOI: 10.1039/C1PP05164D, Perspective

Engineered photoreceptors as novel optogenetic tools
Andreas Möglich and Keith Moffat
Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2010,9, 1286-1300
DOI: 10.1039/C0PP00167H, Perspective

Targeted photodynamic therapy of breast cancer cells using antibody–phthalocyanine–gold nanoparticle conjugates
Tanya Stuchinskaya, Miguel Moreno, Michael J. Cook, Dylan R. Edwards and David A. Russell
Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2011,10, 822-831
DOI: 10.1039/C1PP05014A, Paper

Photoactivatable fluorophores and techniques for biological imaging applications
Wen-hong Li and Genhua Zheng
Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2012,11, 460-471
DOI: 10.1039/C2PP05342J, Perspective

Photoremovable protecting groups: reaction mechanisms and applications
Anna Paola Pelliccioli and Jakob Wirz
Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2002,1, 441-458
DOI: 10.1039/B200777K, Perspective

Human safety review of “nano” titanium dioxide and zinc oxide
Karsten Schilling, Bobbie Bradford, Dominique Castelli, Eric Dufour, J. Frank Nash, Wolfgang Pape, Stefan Schulte, Ian Tooley, Jeroen van den Bosch and Florian Schellauf
Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2010,9, 495-509
DOI: 10.1039/B9PP00180H, Perspective

UV wavelength-dependent DNA damage and human non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancer
Gerd P. Pfeifer and Ahmad Besaratinia
Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2012,11, 90-97
DOI: 10.1039/C1PP05144J, Perspective

Controlled surface trap state photoluminescence from CdS QDs impregnated in poly(methyl methacrylate)
Santanu Karan, Manisree Majumder and Biswanath Mallik
Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2012,11, 1220-1232
DOI: 10.1039/C2PP25023C, Paper

Take a look at the articles and then post your thoughts and comments below.

Interested in submitting your own work to Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences? Submit online today, or email us with your suggestions.

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PPS issue 3 now available online!

Issue 3 of Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences is now available to read online.

Front cover of PPS issue 3, 2013The front cover this month feature work by Halan Prakash and colleagues from the Birla Institute of Technology and Science, India, who looked at the ability of persulphate to cause degradation of organic contaminants and also its effect on bacteria in aqueous media. The team used methyl orange, a model azo dye, and Gram positive and negative bacteria. Visible light activation of persulphate was achieved using ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes, which produced sulphate radicals and led to significant degradation of methyl orange as well as complete inactivation of bacteria.

Photodegradation of methyl orange and photoinactivation of bacteria by visible light activation of persulphate using a tris(2,2′-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) complex, Gokulakrishnan Subramanian, Priyadarshini Parakh and Halan Prakash, Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2013, 12, 456-466

You can keep up to date with the latest developments from Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences by signing up for free table of contents alerts.

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