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Outstanding Reviewers for Nanoscale in 2017

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Nanoscale in 2017, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Professor Xueyuan Chen, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, ORCID: 0000-0003-0493-839X
Dr Hong Jin Fan, Nanyang Technological University, ORCID:  0000-0003-1237-4555
Professor Zhanjun Gu, Institute of High Energy Physics, ORCID: 0000-0003-3717-2423
Professor Hong Liu, Shandong University, ORCID:  0000-0002-4110-6333
Professor Jang Ung Park, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, ORCID: 0000-0003-1522-4958
Dr Yarjan Samad, University of Cambridge
Dr Yuxin Tang, Nanyang Technological University, ORCID: 0000-0001-9348-323X
Professor Yusuke Yamauchi, University of Queensland, Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology
Professor Yuchao Yang, Peking University, ORCID: 0000-0003-4674-4059
Dr Xiaojian Zhu, University of Michigan

We would also like to thank the Nanoscale board and the nanoscience and nanotechnology community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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Meet our new Associate Editors

We are delighted to welcome five new Associate Editors for Nanoscale!

Quan Li

 

Quan Li is Professor at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong. She obtained her B.S. in Chemistry from Beijing University, China in 1997 and then her PhD in Materials Science and Engineering from Northwestern University, USA, in 2001. Her research interests focus on functional materials and structures for energy and biomedical applications, as well as quantum sensing. In particular, developing energy storage materials such as electrode materials/architectures for Li- and Na- ion batteries. In investigating nano-bio interfaces, her group works on manipulating the interplay of nanoparticles of biological systems, and nanoparticles for vaccination applications. Her work of quantum sensing focus on sensor development and application in condense matter physics and biomedicine.

 

Paolo Samori

 

Paolo Samorì is Distinguished Professor at the Université de Strasbourg (UNISTRA), Director of the Institut de Science et d’Ingénierie Supramoléculaires (ISIS) and Director of the Nanochemistry Laboratory. He is also Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (FRSC), Fellow of the European Academy of Sciences (EURASC), Member of the Academia Europaea and Junior Member of the Institut Universitaire de France (IUF). He obtained a Laurea in Industrial Chemistry at University of Bologna in 1995. In 2000 he received his PhD in Chemistry from the Humboldt University of Berlin. He has been awarded various prizes, including the Spanish-French “Catalán-Sabatier” Prize (2017) and the German-French “Georg Wittig – Victor Grignard” Prize (2017). He has published over 270 papers in the areas of nanoscience/nanotechnology and materials sciences with a specific focus on graphene and other 2D materials and self-assembled nanostructures, and more generally on (multi)functional nanomaterials for applications in opto-electronics, energy and sensing. He is also expert on hierarchical self-assembly of hybrid systems and on the use of scanning probe microscopies to unravel structures and dynamics of molecules at surfaces and interfaces.

 

Elena Shevchenko

 

Elena Shevchenko received her undergraduate degree in chemistry from the Belorussian State University in 1998 and PhD from the University of Hamburg in 2003. From 2003 to 2005, she was a joint postdoctoral fellow between Columbia University and the T. J. Watson Research Center. In 2005 she became a staff scientist at the Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Since 2007, she has been a staff scientist at the Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne National Laboratory. Her work has been recognized by Technology Review 35, Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers and Crain’s Chicago Business 40 under 40. Research in Elena’s group focuses on the understanding of the mechanism of nucleation and growth of nanomaterials using in-situ techniques, exploring the structure-property correlation at the nanoscale, nanoparticle self-assembly and design of nanoscale functional materials for application in energy storage and energy conversion.

 

Lingdong Sun

 

Lingdong Sun is Professor at State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, Peking University, China. She obtained her PhD from Changchun Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, in 1996 before completing a post-doctoral research fellowship at Peking University in 1998. She has been a JSPS Senior Visiting Scholar at Keio University, Japan, since 2001. Her research is directed towards outstanding phenomena related with nanostructures including, excitonic transition and localized plasmonic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals; luminescent rare earth nanomaterials, bio-detection and imaging; materials chemistry in preparation and integration of individual nanostructures into functional assemblies.

 

Benjamin Wiley

 

Benjamin J. Wiley is an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Duke University. He received his B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Minnesota in 2003, and his PhD in Chemical Engineering from the University of Washington, Seattle in 2007. From 2007-2009, he was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University. Prof. Wiley is the recipient of the Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award, the CAREER award from the Nation Science Foundation, the Beilby Metal from the Royal Society of Chemistry, and has been recognized as a Highly Cited Researcher by Thomson Reuters, His current research focuses on sustainable, economical synthesis of nanostructures, understanding the processes that drive anisotropic growth of nanostructures, and understanding the structure-property relationship of nanostructures and nanostructured-composites for applications in optics, electronics, medicine, and electrochemistry.

 

 

 

All of our new Associate Editors are now handling papers for the journal, so we welcome you to submit to their Editor Centres if you feel that your manuscript fits with their area of expertise.

To read more exciting research articles visit our Nanoscale website and our blog. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Material containing perfectly planar octacoordinate titanium predicted

Titanium falls flat in an eight-membered boron ring

Source: Royal Society of Chemistry
(a) Top and (b) side views of the ball and stick model of the predicted 2D TiB4 monolayer. Titanium and boron atoms are denoted by grey and pink spheres, respectively. The black square marks a unit cell

Researchers in China and the US have predicted the first two-dimensional material to contain completely planar octacoordinate transition metal atoms – TiB4. If scientists can make it, the monolayer would contain edge-sharing wheels of eight-membered boron rings with a central titanium atom.

To read the full article visit Chemistry World.

Two-dimensional TiB4 Monolayer Exhibits Planar Octacoordinate Ti
Xin Qu, Jian Lv, Yanchao Wang, Jinghai Yang, Zhongfang Chen and Yanming Ma
Nanoscale, 2017, Accepted Manuscript
http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/C7NR05688E

 

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Outstanding Reviewers for Nanoscale in 2016

Following the success of Peer Review Week in September 2016 (dedicated to reviewer recognition) during which we published a list of our top reviewers, we are delighted to announce that we will continue to recognise the contribution that our reviewers make to the journal by announcing our Outstanding Reviewers each year.

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Nanoscale in 2016, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Professor Katsuhiko Ariga, National Institute for Materials Science
Dr Yu-Lun Cheuh, National Tsing Hua University
Dr Zheyu Fang, Peking University
Professor Nam-Gyu Park, Sungkyunkwan University
Dr Ilia Valov, Research Centre Jülich
Dr Zhikun Wu, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science
Dr Yusuke Yamauchi, National Institute for Materials Science
Professor Yuchao Yang, Peking University
Professor Shu-Hong Yu, University of Science and Technology of China
Professor Haibo Zeng, Nanjing University of Science and Technology

We would also like to thank the Nanoscale board and the nanoscience community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé. You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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Top 10 Reviewers for Nanoscale

In celebration of Peer Review Week, with the theme of Recognition for Review – we would like to highlight the top 10 reviewers for Nanoscale in 2016, as selected by the editor for their significant contribution to the journal.

Name Institution
Dr Yuchao Yang Peking University
Professor Shu-Hong Yu University of Science and Technology of China
Professor Zhuang Liu Soochow University
Professor Haibo Zeng Nanjing University of Science and Technology
Dr Katsuhiko Ariga National Institute for Materials Science
Professor David Lou Nanyang Technological University
Dr Yu-Lun Chueh National Tsinghua Univeristy
Dr Wolfgang Parak Philipps University Marburg
Dr Jihang Lee University of Michigan
Dr Ilia Valov Research Centre Juelich

We would like to say a massive thank you to these reviewers as well as the Nanoscale board and all of the nanoscience community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.


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Emerging topic: Two-dimensional materials

Two-dimensional materials research is an emerging topic area, in particular their application in electronic devices. To help our readers stay up to date we have collected papers published in Nanoscale into one online web collection entitled 2D materials for electronic devices.

Editor’s Choice selection from Associate Editor, Professor Andrea Ferarri

A highly conducting graphene film with dual-side molecular n-doping
Youngsoo Kim, Jaesung Park, Junmo Kang, Je Min Yoo, Kyoungjun Choi, Eun Sun Kim, Jae-Boong Choi, Chanyong Hwang, K. S. Novoselov and Byung Hee Hong
Nanoscale, 2014,6, 9545-9549

“Graphene has many record properties. It is transparent like (or better than) plastic, but conducts heat and electricity better than any metal, it is an elastic film, behaves as an impermeable membrane, and it is chemically inert and stable. Thus it seems ideal as the next generation transparent conductor. There is a need to find a substitute for indium tin oxide (ITO) in the manufacturing of various types of displays and touch screens, due to the brittleness of indium that makes it difficult to use them when flexibility is a requirement. Graphene is an ideal candidate for such a task. Thus, coupled with carbon’s abundance, this presents a more sustainable alternative to ITO. Prototypes of graphene-based displays have been produced and commercial products seem imminent.

One drawback is that, in order to beat ITO’s conductivity, graphene needs to be doped. Kim et al. report a dual-side molecular doping method, demonstrating effective work function modulation, high carrier density and significant reduction of sheet resistance in large area graphene samples grown by chemical vapour deposition. With further optimization, their approach may enable a variety of practical applications of graphene films requiring low sheet resistance comparable to indium tin oxide (ITO), as well as high transparency and flexibility.”

Here are some popular articles from the collection:

Graphene-analogue carbon nitride: novel exfoliation synthesis and its application in photocatalysis and photoelectrochemical selective detection of trace amount of Cu2+
Hui Xu, Jia Yan, Xiaojie She, Li Xu, Jiexiang Xia, Yuanguo Xu, Yanhua Song, Liying Huang and Huaming Li
Nanoscale, 2014, 6, 1406-1415

Electrochemical properties of CVD grown pristine graphene: monolayer- vs. quasi-graphene
Dale A. C. Brownson, Sarah A. Varey, Fiazal Hussain, Sarah J. Haigh and Craig E. Banks
Nanoscale, 2014,6, 1607-1621

Transparent conductors composed of nanomaterials
Michael Layani, Alexander Kamyshny and Shlomo Magdassi
Nanoscale, 2014, 6, 5581-5591

Access the full collection here!

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Highlights from ChinaNANO

The Nanoscale Editorial Office is delighted at the success of the Nanoscience Symposium which occurred at the ChinaNANO 2015 conference in Beijing from 3rd-5th September. This one-day symposium included talks from the Nanoscale Associate Editors about their latest research covering topics such as carbon nanomaterials, nanoelectronics, bionanomaterials, nanophotonics, nanoclusters and nanocrystals.

Some articles submitted to Nanoscale from delegates of the ChinaNANO 2015 conference can be found below.

Surface coating of siRNA-peptidomimetic nano-self-assemblies with anionic lipid bilayers: Enhanced gene silencing and reduced adverse effects in vitro
Xianghui Zeng, Anne Marit de Groot, Alice Sijts, Femke Broere, Erik Oude Blenke, Stefano Colombo, Willem van Eden, Henrik Franzyk, Hanne M Nielsen and Camilla Foged
Nanoscale, 2015, DOI: 10.1039/C5NR04807A

Strong metal-support interaction in novel core-shell Au-CeO2 nanostructures induced by different pretreatment atmospheres and its influence on CO oxidation
Zhihua Wang, Huifen Fu, Ziwei Tian, Dongmei Han and Fubo Gu
Nanoscale, 2015, DOI: 10.1039/C5NR06929G

Fabrication of ultra-thin silicon nanowire arrays using ion beam assisted chemical etching
Zhiyuan Tan, Wenjia Shi, Chungang Guo, Quan Zhang, Liang Yang, Xiaoling Wu, Guo-an Cheng and Ruiting Zheng
Nanoscale, 2015,7, 17268-17273, DOI: 10.1039/C5NR02876K

Ethanol-assisted gel chromatography for single-chirality separation of carbon nanotubes
Xiang Zeng, Jinwen Hu, Xiao Zhang, Naigen Zhou, Weiya Zhou, Huaping Liu and Sishen Xie
Nanoscale, 2015,7, 16273-16281, DOI: 10.1039/C5NR04116C

There was a great turn-out and we received a lot of useful feedback from the attendees.

A prominent highlight of the event was the reception organised by the Royal Society of Chemistry to celebrate the launch of Nanoscale Horizons as well as the Nanoscale and Nanoscale Horizons partnership with the National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (NCNST) in Beijing which included cutting an enormous cake!

Left to right: Xiaodong Chen, Fiona McKenzie, Chunli Bai and Xingyu Jiang

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Call for Nanotechnology Data Reporting Guidelines

Dr. Mervi Heiskanen

Dr. Stephanie Morris

The authors of this article are both Program Managers based at the US National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology and Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research, respectively, working towards improving quality of and access to published experimental data.

In recent years, there has been increasing interest in improving how nanomaterials are defined and characterized due to a lack of specific nano-related metadata standards in the Nanotechnology field. The nano-community agrees data reporting guidelines would facilitate data reproducibility and reuse.

The recent collaboration between Elsevier Journals and the NCI cancer Nanotechnology Laboratory (caNanoLab) data portal is an important step towards providing researchers with easy access to high quality nanotechnology data for reproduction and re-use. However, access to data is only useful if information about experimental details is available. Is there something we can do to improve usability of nanotechnology data?

The lack of high quality nanotechnology research data is a known challenge, further complicated by the diversity and growing number of nanomaterials. The OMICs communities (e.g., genomics and proteomics) have pioneered the development of databases such as the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) Database and the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB), as well as standard guidelines for recording data. These guidelines define the minimum information that must be reported and stored, and facilitate data reproducibility and integration across different datasets to enable further analysis by the research community. Many of these reporting guidelines can be accessed at Biosharing, and are required by journals for data deposition during the manuscript submission process.

Several STM journals already require authors to adhere to minimum characterization requirements, particularly when reporting new chemical compounds, which reviewers are asked to evaluate to ensure reproducibility and reliability of the research. Nature and its sister journals have further enforced this for their life science articles by implementing an initiative which includes the submission of a checklist by authors intended to remind them to provide sufficient experimental details to enable reproducibility. However, we need to agree on a nanotechnology-specific checklist, and extend the reproducibility initiative to include other relevant journals. This needs to be a collaborative effort driven by the research community, editors and publishers, regulatory agencies, and funding organizations in order for this to become common practice and lead to improvements in data reuse.

The nanotechnology community is in the early stages of defining metadata that should be included in data submissions, and recognizes the metadata will differ by research field (e.g., biomedicine, ecological studies, and health and safety). Examples of nanomaterial databases working towards this goal include caNanoLab, which uses MinChar, and the Nanomaterial Registry’s Minimal Information about Nanomaterials (MIAN). However, there is no common minimal information guideline agreed upon by the larger nanotechnology community. The need for the development of a common reporting recommendation has been recognized by the NCI Nanotechnology Working Group (NCI Nano WG). With active participants from federal institutions, academia, and industry, primarily from the US and the NanoSafety Cluster in Europe, the NCI Nano WG can serve as a coordinating body for collecting community input across nanotechnology research fields. A nanotechnology minimal information standard is also of great interest to the US National Nanotechnology Initiative, which has developed a signature initiative on nanoinformatics (Nanotechnology Knowledge Infrastructure) that works with the nanotechnology community to provide resources and tools.

We believe that data submission guidelines combined with better access to data will improve data quality and reproducibility and will ultimately translate to advances in areas such as biomedical research, environmental safety, and nanomanufacturing. Collaboration and coordination among all stakeholders is needed to ensure data submission guidelines benefit all parties.

If everyone is moving forward together, then success takes care of itself.” – Henry Ford

DisclosureViews expressed in this web article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views or polices of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

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Nanoscale 2014 Impact Factor released

We are thrilled to announce that Nanoscale’s latest impact factor has risen to 7.394 according to the 2014 Journal Citation Reports ®.

Thank you to all of the authors and referees who have contributed to our journal. Special thanks goes to our dedicated team of Editorial Board members without whom our continued success would not have been possible.

We invite you to join your peers and submit your best work to Nanoscale today.

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6th International Conference on Nanoscience and Technology (ChinaNANO 2015)

ChinaNANO 2015

Nanoscale is proud to collaborate with the 6th International Conference on Nanoscience and Technology (ChinaNANO 2015), which will be held at the Beijing International Convention Center in Beijing, China on 3-5 September 2015. The conference is organised by the National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, China. Professor Chunli Bai will act as the Chairman of the organising committee.

ChinaNANO 2015 aims to stimulate discussions on the forefront of research in nanoscience and nanotechnology, focusing on the following topics: carbon nanomaterials, inorganic nanomaterials and MOFs, self-assembly and supramolecules, nanocomposites and applications, energy and environmental nanotechnology, nanophotonics and optoelectronics, nanodevices and nanosystems, nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine, nanocharacterization and metrology, modelling and simulation of nanostructures, and the environment, safety and health of nanomaterials.

Submit your abstract now – the deadline is 30 April 2015. For more information, please see the conference website.

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