ChinaNANO 2017 Conference

Early bird registration deadline extended until 31 July so register now!

The 7th International Conference on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, China 2017 (ChinaNANO 2017) will be held in Beijing on 29 – 31 August, bringing together scientists from across the globe.

We are proud to announce the Nanoscale Horizons Symposium at ChinaNANO 2017, with talks from distinguished board members for Nanoscale and other Royal Society of Chemistry journals to showcase exceptionally high quality and exciting work across a broad scope of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Confirmed speakers include:

  • Professor Chunli Bai (President of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, China; Editor-in-chief of Nanoscale)
  • Professor Xiaodong Chen (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)
  • Professor Yamuna Krishnan (University of Chicago, USA)
  • Professor Katharina Landfester (Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Germany)
  • Professor Federico Rosei (National Institute of Scientific Research, University of Quebec, Canada)
  • Professor Francesco Stellacci (EPFL, Switzerland)
  • Professor Jianfang Wang (Chinese University of Hong Kong, China)
  • Professor Jinhua Ye (National Institute for Materials Science, Japan)

ChinaNANO 2017 is intended to stimulate discussions on the forefront of research in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The conference will focus on the following topics:

  • Carbon Nanomaterials
  • Inorganic Nanomaterials and Metal-organic Frameworks
  • Self-Assembly and Soft Nanomaterials
  • Nanocatalysis
  • Nano-Composites and Applications
  • Energy Nanotechnology
  • Environmental Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
  • Nanophotonics and Plasmonics
  • 2D Materials beyond Graphene and Nanodevices
  • Nanocharacterization
  • Standards and Metrology
  • Modeling and Simulation of Nanostructures
  • Nanobiotechnology and Nanomedicine
  • Nanotechnology for Bioimaging and Diagnostics
  • Safety and Health of Nanomaterials
  • Printing of Nanomaterials and Applications
  • Optoelectronic Nanomaterials and Devices
  • Bioinspired Interfacial Materials and Devices
 
For more information about this exciting conference, please visit their web page.
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Material containing perfectly planar octacoordinate titanium predicted

Article written by Jennifer Newton

Titanium falls flat in an eight-membered boron ring

Source: Royal Society of Chemistry
(a) Top and (b) side views of the ball and stick model of the predicted 2D TiB4 monolayer. Titanium and boron atoms are denoted by grey and pink spheres, respectively. The black square marks a unit cell

Researchers in China and the US have predicted the first two-dimensional material to contain completely planar octacoordinate transition metal atoms – TiB4. If scientists can make it, the monolayer would contain edge-sharing wheels of eight-membered boron rings with a central titanium atom.

To read the full article visit Chemistry World.

Two-dimensional TiB4 Monolayer Exhibits Planar Octacoordinate Ti
Xin Qu, Jian Lv, Yanchao Wang, Jinghai Yang, Zhongfang Chen and Yanming Ma
Nanoscale, 2017, Accepted Manuscript
http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/C7NR05688E

 

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Improved wound care glue from metal oxide nanoparticles

written by Alexander Cook

The need for tough, easily producible, tissue adhesives for medical applications is significant, and much recent research has focused on this expanding field. Surgical and wound care complications remain a major cause of post-operative mortality. Materials used for these applications need to withstand various mechanical deformations and movements while remaining strongly attached to the intended tissue.

A simple route to tissue adhesives has recently been described involving silica nanoparticles acting as physical adhesive layer between tissues. New research from the Hermann group at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology has expanded upon this concept with a new article published in Nanoscale. The researchers produce a library of inorganic oxide nanoparticles using a scalable and sterile flame spray pyrolysis method. The particles are then used study how different combinations of nanoparticles affect performance as tissue adhesives and also the toxicity of the resulting tissue adhesive materials.

An optimal composition of a mixture of bioglass and silica nanoparticles were found to have exceptionally strong procoagulant and adhesive properties whilst also maintaining superior cyto-compatibility. This highly modular synthetic method paves the way for use of metal oxide nanoparticles as bioactive adhesives in a range of exciting surgical and regenerative medicine applications.

 

Fig. 1. Inorganic nanoparticles and their use as tissue adhesives

Read the article:
Martin T. Matter, Fabian Starsich, Marco Galli, Markus Hilber, Andrea A. Schlegel, Sergio Bertazzo, Sotiris E. Pratsinis and Inge K. Herrmann
Nanoscale, 2017, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C7NR01176H

 

Alexander Cook is a guest web writer for the RSC journal blogs. He is a PhD researcher in the Perrier group at the University of Warwick, focusing on polymer materials and their use in various applications. Follow him on twitter @alexcook222

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Micromotors navigate tiny biochemical lab

Micromotors have been used for a wide range of applications, from hydrogen generation and bacteria capture, and now scientists from the University of Alcalá, Spain have utilised these useful micromachines in a lab-on-a-chip device. The little machines can navigate through the confined space to carry out fluorescence-based detection and even transport cargo in a complex medium that simulates blood plasma. There is no need for complex valves or pumps, just a simple magnetic field.

Described by nanobioelectronics and nanomotor experts as “a wonderful example” of carbon-based rockets for active transport showcasing a “potential breakthrough” as one of “very few practical applications”. Of particular importance is the incorporation of an anti-fouling layer that allows the micromotors to travel through complex mediums without degrading. This has the potential to overcome on of the key limiting factors in the advancement of biomedical applications in this field.

Read the full article in Chemistry World.

 

R. Maria-Hormigos, B. Jurado-Sánchez and A. Escarpa
Nanoscale, 2017,9, 6286-6290
DOI: 10.1039/C6NR09750B, Communicaton
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Conference promotion – ANM 2017

Nanoscale and Nanoscale Horizons are proud to support ANM 2017  a conference series on Advanced Nanomaterials, along Energy & Environmental Science, Molecular Systems Design & Engineering, and Sustainable Energy & Fuels. This conference series will take place at University of Aveiro, Portugal on 19 – 21 July 2017, and comprises the following symposia:

  • 9th International Conference on Advanced Nanomaterials
  • 3rd International Conference on Advanced Graphene Materials
  • 2nd International Conference on Advanced Magnetic and Spintronics Materials
  • 1st International Conference on Advanced Polymer Materials and Nanocomposites
  • A session dedicated to Hydrogen Energy

Poster abstract submission ends on 20 June and the registration deadline is 10 July! Visit the website for a full list of topics and speakers.

 

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Prize Winner: Professor Xiao Cheng Zen

Congratulations to our Associate Editor, Professor Xiao Cheng Zen, who has been awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry Surfaces and Interfaces Award for 2017 for his development of a unified theory to understand the relationship between structure and properties of nanoscale materials at surfaces and interfaces.

 

Xiao Cheng Zeng is currently at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where his main research interests cover the physical chemistry of confined water, ice, and ice hydrate in nanoscale; ions and radicals at air/water interfaces; heterogeneous catalysis on supported gold clusters; and computer-aided design of low-dimensional materials including liganded gold clusters and perovskite solar-cell materials.

He is the recipient of many awards, and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the American Physical Society (APS), and the Royal Society of Chemistry (FRSC). He has published 475+ articles in refereed journals (Google Scholar h-index: 70; citations 17000+). Four articles were featured in Chemistry World (RSC) and ten papers were featured in Chemical & Engineering News (ACS).

 

 

Professor Xiao Cheng Zen has been an Associate Editor for Nanoscale since 2012, and we congratulate him for his success!

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New crosslinked conjugated polymers in quantum dot LEDs

Written by Alex Cook

A new photo-induced polymer crosslinking strategy has been used to produce optoelectronic devices with improved performance by a group of Chinese researchers. This has allowed quantum dot LED devices to be fabricated on flexible plastic substrates as the scientists can avoid high temperature thermal annealing.

Developed at Soochow University and Shanghai Jiaotong University, the researchers believe this crosslinking strategy provides an excellent general method for improving film quality in solution-processed multi-layer LEDs and optoelectronic devices.

The improved efficiency of the devices has been ascribed to superior film surface morphology of the device layers, as the range of non-orthogonal solvents able to be used for solution processing is greatly broadened due to layer crosslinking. The device is based on a hole transport layer of conjugated polymer poly[(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-(4,4’-(N-(4-butylphenyl)))] (TFB), which is crosslinked with a bifunctional benzophenone, with the crosslinked hole transport layer device giving a 2 times higher efficiency than the device without layer crosslinking.

Fig. 1. New photochemical crosslinking method enables fabrication of novel all-solution-processed multilayer optoelectronic devices to improve device performance using both orthogonal and non-orthogonal solvents.

 

Read the article:

Crosslinked conjugated polymers as hole transport layers in high-performance quantum dot light-emitting diodes

Yatao Zou, Ying Liu, Muyang Ban, Qi Huang, Teng Sun, Qing Zhang,* Tao Song* and Baoquan Sun*

Nanoscale Horizons, 2017, DOI: 10.1039/C6NH00217J

 

Alexander Cook is a guest web writer for the RSC journal blogs. He is a PhD researcher in the Perrier group at the University of Warwick, focusing on polymer materials and their use in various applications. Follow him on twitter @alexcook222

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Outstanding Reviewers for Nanoscale in 2016

Following the success of Peer Review Week in September 2016 (dedicated to reviewer recognition) during which we published a list of our top reviewers, we are delighted to announce that we will continue to recognise the contribution that our reviewers make to the journal by announcing our Outstanding Reviewers each year.

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Nanoscale in 2016, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Professor Katsuhiko Ariga, National Institute for Materials Science
Dr Yu-Lun Cheuh, National Tsing Hua University
Dr Zheyu Fang, Peking University
Professor Nam-Gyu Park, Sungkyunkwan University
Dr Ilia Valov, Research Centre Jülich
Dr Zhikun Wu, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science
Dr Yusuke Yamauchi, National Institute for Materials Science
Professor Yuchao Yang, Peking University
Professor Shu-Hong Yu, University of Science and Technology of China
Professor Haibo Zeng, Nanjing University of Science and Technology

We would also like to thank the Nanoscale board and the nanoscience community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé. You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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Detecting trace biomarkers using SERS in the fight against cancer

Written by Dr Lee Barrett

Cancer remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Therefore, the importance of early screening of cancer can aid in the prevention and treatment. However, early onset of cancers can often produce limited or no symptoms. In this regard, researchers have turned their attention to miRNA biomarkers found in serum as potential biomarkers for cancer detection. At the onset of cancer, miRNA biomarkers often present at very low concentrations representing a big challenge for researchers to develop analytical tools that can achieve the sensitivity required.

Researchers from Nanjing, China and Georgia, USA have investigated surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) as a viable technique for the detection of 3 miRNA biomarkers related to lung cancer. To achieve this, the researchers used a silver nanorod (AgNR) array to provide the plasmonic enhancement required for SERS. The substrate was subsequently functionalised with molecular beacons (MBs) containing different Raman reporters (ROX, Cy5 and FAM) that are complementary to the miRNA targets. In the absence of miRNA target, the SERS signal remains high since the MBs, and, therefore, the Raman reporters, are orientated close to the AgNR substrate. However, when the MBs hybridise to the target sequence, the SERS signal drops in a concentration-related manner allowing quantitation of the target miRNAs in buffer and human serum. The limits of detection for the 3 biomarkers, miRNA-21/486/375, were 393, 176 and 144 aM, respectively.

This research highlights the advantages of using SERS for biomarker detection. The low sensitivity and ability to multiplex make SERS a promising analytical technique for future clinical analyses for cancer detection and other diseases.

Scheme 1 Schematic illustration of the preparation and application of the molecular beacon functionalized-SERS sensor for simultaneously measuring multiple miRNAs.

An ultrasensitive SERS sensor for simultaneous detection of multiple cancer-related miRNAs
C. Y. Song, Y. J. Yang, B. Y. Yang, Y. Z. Sun, Y. P. Zhao and L. H. Wang
Nanoscale, 2016, 8, 17365-17373

Dr Lee Barrett is a guest web writer for the Nanoscale blog. Lee is currently a postdoctoral researcher in the Centre for Molecular Nanometrology at the University of Strathclyde. His research is currently focused on the development of nanoparticle-based sensors and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Follow him on twitter @L_Bargie

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Direct real-time detection of single proteins using silicon nanowire-based electrical circuits

By .

Written by Alexander Cook

The development of analytical devices that convert biological response into an electrical signal is a very important goal with great potential benefits for clinical diagnostics, environmental science, and defense.

In a recent communication published in Nanoscale, researchers discuss findings from a newly developed single silicon nanowire (SiNW) based biosensor, which is able to directly detect protein adsorption/desorption at single-molecule resolutions.

Fig. 1 Schematic demonstration of SiNW FET-based electrical biosensors, where Au electrodes are passivated by using a thermally deposited 50 nm-thick SiO2 layer. The inset shows how His-tag F1-ATPase is immobilized on the surface of SiNWs through Ni2+ chelation.

SiNW’s were synthesised following an Au-catalysed vapor deposition method and then high-density SiNW array devices were fabricated on silicon substrates using photolithography. Subsequently the devices were functionalized in a stepwise manner to impart the biomolecule recognizing Nickel functionality, and characterized with XPS and FTIR spectroscopy.

By combining theses devices with microfluidic systems, the authors were able to achieve real-time, direct detection of the chelation between Nickel and the imidazole of His-tags in the target biomolecules (F1 ATPases) at the single-event level. This nondestructive and label-free sensor shows great promise for number verification and real-time monitoring of proteins in complex biological systems.

Direct real-time detection of single proteins using silicon nanowire-based electrical circuits
Jie Li, Gen He, Hiroshi Ueno, Chuancheng Jia, Hiroyuki Noji, Chuanmin Qi and Xuefeng Guo
Nanoscale, 2016, DOI: 10.1039/C6NR04103E

Alexander Cook is a guest web writer for the RSC journal blogs. He is a PhD researcher in the Perrier group at the University of Warwick, focusing on polymer materials and their use in various applications. Follow him on twitter @alexcook222

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