Archive for February, 2012

Top 10 most-read Nanoscale articles in January

This month sees the following articles in Nanoscale that are in the top ten most accessed for January:

A new ultrahigh-speed method for the preparation of nanofibers containing living cells: A bridge towards industrial bioengineering applications
Bingan Lu ,  Yongmin He ,  Huigao Duan ,  Yijie Zhang ,  Xiaodong Li ,  Chenquan Zhu and Erqing Xie
Nanoscale, 2012, 4, 1003-1009
DOI: 10.1039/C2NR11430E 

Graphene edges: a review of their fabrication and characterization
Xiaoting Jia ,  Jessica Campos-Delgado ,  Mauricio Terrones ,  Vincent Meunier and Mildred S. Dresselhaus
Nanoscale, 2011, 3, 86-95
DOI: 10.1039/C0NR00600A 

Molding the flow of light on the nanoscale: from vortex nanogears to phase-operated plasmonic machinery
Svetlana V. Boriskina and Björn M. Reinhard
Nanoscale, 2012, 4, 76-90
DOI: 10.1039/C1NR11406A 

Towards chirality-pure carbon nanotubes
Yani Zhang and Lianxi Zheng
Nanoscale, 2010, 2, 1919-1929
DOI: 10.1039/C0NR00222D 

Theranostic nanoplatforms for simultaneous cancer imaging and therapy: current approaches and future perspectives
Ki Young Choi ,  Gang Liu ,  Seulki Lee and Xiaoyuan Chen
Nanoscale, 2012, 4, 330-342
DOI: 10.1039/C1NR11277E 

The role of nanomaterials in redox-based supercapacitors for next generation energy storage devices
Xin Zhao ,  Beatriz Mendoza Sánchez ,  Peter J. Dobson and Patrick S. Grant
Nanoscale, 2011, 3, 839-855
DOI: 10.1039/C0NR00594K 

Single nanoparticle detectors for biological applications
Abdulkadir Yurt ,  George G. Daaboul ,  John H. Connor ,  Bennett B. Goldberg and M. Selim Ünlü
Nanoscale, 2012, 4, 715-726
DOI: 10.1039/C2NR11562J 

Graphene: nanoscale processing and recent applications
László P. Biró ,  Péter Nemes-Incze and Philippe Lambin
Nanoscale, 2012, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C1NR11067E 

Graphene decoration with metal nanoparticles: Towards easy integration for sensing applications
Albert Gutés ,  Ben Hsia ,  Allen Sussman ,  Willi Mickelson ,  Alex Zettl ,  Carlo Carraro and Roya Maboudian
Nanoscale, 2012, 4, 438-440
DOI: 10.1039/C1NR11537E 

Microwave chemistry for inorganic nanomaterials synthesis
Idalia Bilecka and Markus Niederberger
Nanoscale, 2010, 2, 1358-1374
DOI: 10.1039/B9NR00377K 

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Nanoscale? Then why not submit to us today!

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Recent Advances in Semiconductor Nanowire Research

We are delighted to announce that the Nanoscale themed issue on Recent Advances in Semiconductor Nanowire Research has now been published online – take a look today!

The issue was Guest Edited by Hong Jin Fan and Qihua Xiong (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore) – take a look at their Editorial for the issue.

Professor Hongjin Fan also provided the colourful artwork for this front cover!  

Issue 5 contains the following Review, Mini-Review and Feature articles:

Fancy submitting an article to Nanoscale? Then why not submit to us today!

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Interview with co-Editor-in-Chief of Nanoscale Jie Liu

Jie Liu photo

Photography courtesy of Megan Morr at Duke Photography

Co-Editor-in-Chief Jie Liu talks to Nanoscale about who has inspired him on his scientific journey so far and his ambitious plans to see Nanoscale being read across the globe.

Liu is the Jerry G. and Patricia Crawford Hubbard Professor of Chemistry at Duke University, USA and his research interests include carbon nanotubes, nanoelectronics, ZnO nanostructures and microporous carbon.

Professor Liu is now handling papers for Nanoscale. You can submit you high impact research to his Editorial Office.

Who inspired you to become a scientist?

My father. He was a high school chemistry teacher, and when I was really, really young he put the dream of becoming a scientist into my head. When I was young in China he started subscribing to scientific magazines. I started reading these articles and was amazed about what science can do and slowly he managed to sink this idea of becoming a scientist in my head and that just stayed.

How did you get involved in nanoscience?

In China when I was a college student with a chemistry major, I quickly realised that I liked physical chemistry a lot, and colloidal science was an area I got very interested in and choose as the topic of my undergraduate research project and then my Masters degree.

When I came to the US I was very lucky to get the chance to work with Charles Lieber on materials science and surface chemistry and we studied the atomic structure of very tiny domains of 2D crystals. That led me to be very interested in nanoscience.

When I was looking for a postdoc I had a chance to work with [Professor Richard E.] Smalley – before I applied for a position in his lab he came to Northeastern University in Boston to give a talk. I went there to listen to him talking about carbon nanotubes. He was such a good public speaker – the talk was great: very inspiring and interesting. I wrote him a letter: I am really interested in this, can you take me as a postdoc? And he did take me. I went to his lab and really started enjoying carbon nanotube research. I had a very exciting three years of post doc experience in Rick Smalley’s lab.

When I was looking for my own position, I found a Professor job at Duke University and decided to continue in the general field of carbon nanotubes and of course my research interests expanded beyond CNTs over the years– I am really interested in controlling the materials structure and properties at the nanoscale, so over the last 10 years we worked on CNTs, nanowires, nanoparticles, and surface nanolithography using an atomic force microscope. I really enjoy my research.

What do you think will be the next big breakthrough in your field?

In CNTs one direction is more fundamental: being able to control the helicity of the carbon nanotube is the next big thing. We are making progress along that direction, and there is theoretical work that suggests it might be possible but practically it is very difficult. It needs very precise instruments to be able to control the growth environment precisely, but I’m confident that if we have instrumentation much better than what we have now, we should be able to control the helicity of carbon nanotubes. Right now we can almost control the electronic properties of CNTs, we can make CNTs that are over 95% semiconducting – I think that is one of the directions for CNT research.

I really think nanoscience needs to be more influential and push the field forward at a faster pace in energy research – not just for energy capture, energy storage. Nanoscience is uniquely suited to solve all of these existing of these problems. It’s a very crowded field, many people are working in the field but progress is not that fast. I anticipate bigger breakthroughs in this field in the next couple of years, simply because of the amount of funding, the amount of people and the interest in this field. I think something will come up pretty soon.

What achievement are you most proud of?

The work we did that demonstrated that nanotubes can grow to extreme lengths, aligned by the gas flow; that is a milestone in the field. It demonstrated that if there is no external force that is stopping the growth of CNTs, nanotubes can grow really long and really fast. That was unexpected.

The recent work we did to selectively grow enriched semiconducting CNT arrays, I think with more work in this field we can definitely make the aligned CNT array a very good candidate for future electronic devices.

Another field that I’m very proud of but I’m not currently working on is the development of the electrochemical dip-pen nanolithography from my group. I think that opened the door for dip-pen nanolithography to become a more general, more versatile tool. It made people think about the chemistry underneath the AFM tip and enabled people to develop more AFM-based nanolithography technology.

What advice would you give to a young scientist?

I’m old now? <laughs> I learned from Smalley that if you treat science like your job it’s very hard and very time consuming, but if you treat science as a hobby, something you are very interested in, you want to dive in and play with it, you will have a different feeling about the work you are doing and you will fully enjoy it much more.

What are you most looking forward to most about being co-Editor-in-Chief of Nanoscale?

It’s a very unique opportunity. I was not looking to become Editor for a journal, but when Philip contacted me I looked at the opportunity and I thought, that’s a very good journal, it’s a very good opportunity, it’s my way of paying back to society because I’ve fully enjoyed my research experience in the lab for 10-15 years and I’ve published many papers with the help of different Editors. I appreciate their work, so I think I can get into their shoes and be able to help other people and to contribute to the field from a different direction. That’s what attracted me to this position and I think that with my experience in research, I can help the journal to become more successful by promoting great science and be able to contribute to the field at a different level.

What do you think Nanoscale has to offer authors?

I think Nanoscale is more international than journals by other publishers – that is something unique to Nanoscale. Nanoscale reaches a broader audience, the authors are more widely distributed across the whole world. I like the approach of RSC journals having people from different parts of the world contributing to the journal, like the distribution of Editors from the US, Asia and Europe. The Editors are experts in their field – I think that’s another advantage for the journal. Also the relationship with the Royal Society of Chemistry – that makes it very attractive.

What are your aspirations for Nanoscale?

One of my hopes is to see researchers at universities across the world reading the great new articles in Nanoscale every day. This will mean Nanoscale will become a journal that more people will read, more people will cite and more people will contribute to.

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HOT article: imaging fingerprints for medical diagnostics

Chinese scientists have developed a protocol which allows them to detect the proteins present in latent fingerprints. The authors used silver nanoparticles functionalised with antibodies which could interact with relevant proteins in a fingerprint and studied the prints using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Mapping of the obtained SERS signals gave an image indicating the distribution of the proteins in the print.

The authors suggest this technique could be applied to medical diagnostics.

Read this HOT Nanoscale article today:

Detection of protein deposition on latent fingerprints by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy imaging
Lehui Lu, Wei Song, Zhu Mao, Xiaojuan Liu, Zhishi Li and Bing Zhao
Nanoscale, 2012, DOI: 10.1039/C2NR12030E

image of fluorescent fingerprints

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Nanoscale Editor’s choice: Carbon-based materials

Nanoscale Advisory Board member Professor Hua Zhang, an expert in the field of carbon-based materials, has picked his favourite articles recently published in this area in Nanoscale.Professor Hua Zhang photograph

You can read these articles by clicking on the links below.

Nanoscale publishes high-quality community-spanning research covering the various disciplines involved with nanoscience and nanotechnology.

On behalf of the Editors-in-Chief, Chunli Bai (CAS President, NCNST, Beijing), Jie Liu (Duke), Wei Lu (Michigan), Markus Niederberger (ETH Zurich), and Francesco Stellacci (EPFL) we invite you to submit your best work to Nanoscale.

Read Professor Zhang’s Editor’s choice selection today:

Effect of N/B doping on the electronic and field emission properties for carbon nanotubes, carbon nanocones, and graphene nanoribbons
Shan-Sheng Yu and Wei-Tao Zheng
DOI: 10.1039/C0NR00002G

Properties, synthesis, and growth mechanisms of carbon nanotubes with special focus on thermal chemical vapor deposition
Gilbert D. Nessim
DOI: 10.1039/B9NR00427K

Chemical approaches towards single-species single-walled carbon nanotubes
Cai-Hong Liu and Hao-Li Zhang
DOI: 10.1039/C0NR00306A

Probing the electronic structure of carbon nanotubes by nanoscale spectroscopy
Paola Castrucci, Manuela Scarselli, Maurizio De Crescenzi, My Ali El Khakani and Federico Rosei
DOI: 10.1039/C0NR00111B

A graphene-enhanced molecular beacon for homogeneous DNA detection
Fan Li, Yan Huang, Qing Yang, Zentao Zhong, Di Li, Lihua Wang, Shiping Song and Chunhai Fan
DOI: 10.1039/B9NR00401G

Preparation of graphene by a low-temperature thermal reduction at atmosphere pressure
Wufeng Chen and Lifeng Yan
DOI: 10.1039/B9NR00191C

Single-step synthesis and magnetic separation of graphene and carbon nanotubes in arc discharge plasmas
O. Volotskova, I. Levchenko, A. Shashurin, Y. Raitses, K. Ostrikov and M. Keidar
DOI: 10.1039/C0NR00416B

Graphene nanoribbon band-gap expansion: Broken-bond-induced edge strain and quantum entrapment
Xi Zhang, Jer-lai Kuo, Mingxia Gu, Ping Bai and Chang Q. Sun
DOI: 10.1039/C0NR00273A

High purity graphenes prepared by a chemical intercalation method
Sharali Malik, Aravind Vijayaraghavan, Rolf Erni, Katsuhiko Ariga, Ivan Khalakhan and Jonathan P. Hill
DOI: 10.1039/C0NR00248H

Atomic-scale observation of rotational misorientation in suspended few-layer graphene sheets
Manoj K. Singh, Elby Titus, Gil Gonçalves, Paula A. A. P. Marques, Igor Bdikin, Andrei L. Kholkin and José J. A. Gracio
DOI: 10.1039/B9NR00256A

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Single crystal nanowires with excellent resistive switching

Nanoscale ‘HOT’ article

The single crystal Cu2O nanowires made with low temperature mass production by anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) templated electrochemical method show excellent resistive switching behaviors.

Read the paper:

Confining grains of textured Cu2O films to single-crystal nanowires and resultant change in resistive switching characteristics
Xiao Long Deng, Sahwan Hong, Inrok Hwang, Jin-Soo Kim, Ji Hoon Jeon, Yun Chang Park, Jongjin Lee, Sung-Oong Kang, Tomoji Kawai and Bae Ho Park
Nanoscale, 2012, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2NR12100J

nanowires

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HOT article: Butterfly wing has two seperate nanostructures

Chinese scientists studying the wings of the Trogonoptera Brookiana butterfly have discovered that the light trapping structures which cause the iridescent colours we see are caused by two distinct types of nanostructure one on the front and one on the back of the wing.

Understanding how these natural structures function can give great insight for engineering materials with these properties and could have applications from solar cells to stealth technology.

Read this HOT article in full:

Light Trapping Structures in Wing Scales of Butterfly Trogonoptera Brookiana
Zhiwu Han , shichao niu , Chunhui Shang , Zhenning Liu and Luquan Ren
Nanoscale, 2012
DOI: 10.1039/C2NR12059C Butterfly image

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Luminescent nanoparticles selectively detect mercury ions

Mercury pollution can cause major problems for the health of humans, fish and wildlife. Scientists based in Singapore now report a sensitive sensor for the Hg2+ ions present in aqueous environments which is also inexpensive and easy to produce. The system is based on Ag+-based nanoparticles the luminescence of which is quenched in the presence of mercury ions.

Read this HOT Nanoscale communication today:

Highly luminescent Ag+ nanoclusters for Hg2+ ion detection
Xun Yuan , Teik Jin Yeow , Qingbo Zhang , Jim Yang Lee and Jianping Xie
DOI: 10.1039/C2NR11999D

Graphical abstract image

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Announcing: Challenges in Nanoscience (ISACS9)

We are proud to announce that the International Symposia on Advancing the Chemical Sciences (ISACS) series will return this year including:

Challenges in Nanoscience (ISACS9)

31 August – 3 September 2012

Xiamen, China

Full details surrounding the confirmed speakers and abstract submission process can be found on the dedicated webpage for this significant global conference.

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Modelling of the nanoscale themed issue out now!

We are delighted to announce that the Nanoscale themed issue on Modelling of the nanoscale has now been published online – take a look today!

The issue was Guest Edited by Amanda Barnard, Chang Ming Li, Ruhong Zhou and Yuliang Zhao – take a look at their Editorial.

The outside front cover features an article on Mn monolayer modified Rh for syngas-to-ethanol conversion: a first-principles study by Fengyu Li ,  De-en Jiang ,  Xiao Cheng Zeng and Zhongfang Chen

Ripple induced changes in the wavefunction of graphene: an example of a fundamental symmetry breaking is the article highlighted on the inside front cover by Amanda S. Barnard and Ian K. Snook

Issue 4 contains the following Review and Feature articles:

Fancy submitting an article to Nanoscale? Then why not submit to us today!

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