Archive for the ‘Themed Issue’ Category

NJC Issue 11 online – in honour of Bernard Meunier

NJC  is delighted to announce that NJC issue 11 is available online.

This month’s issue features 27 contributions dedicated to Bernard Meunier, on the occasion of his official retirement from the CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique) in France.

This collection includes high quality articles on a diverse range of topics, including molecular chemistry, dendrimers, nanostructures, organometallic chemistry and catalysis. The issue was guest edited by Azzedine Bousseksou and Jean-Pierre Majoral (CNRS, Toulouse, France). You can read the Editorial to find out more.

In addition to the 44 Full papers and 9 Letters covering a different area of research, issue 11 contains 1 Focus and 3 Perspectives reviews – these review articles are free to access for 4 weeks.

 

Focus

Nanoparticles of molecule-based conductors
Dominique de Caro, Lydie Valade, Christophe Faulmann, Kane Jacob, Diane Van Dorsselaer, Imane Chtioui, Lionel Salmon, Abdelaziz Sabbar, Souad El Hajjaji, Emile Pérez, Sophie Franceschi and Jordi Fraxedas, DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ00555K

Perspectives

Dendrimers as macromolecular tools to tackle from colon to brain tumor types: a concise overview
Serge Mignani and Jean-Pierre Majoral, New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 3337;
DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ00300K

Positively charged phosphorus dendrimers. An overview of their properties
Anne-Marie Caminade and Jean-Pierre Majoral, DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ00583F

Organometallic approach for the synthesis of nanostructures
Catherine Amiens, Bruno Chaudret, Diana Ciuculescu-Pradines, Vincent Collière, Katia Fajerwerg, Pierre Fau, Myrtil Kahn, André Maisonnat, Katerina Soulantica and Karine Philippot, DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ00650F

 

We hope that you will find NJC issue 11 fun and thought-provoking!


Go to the issue now…

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NJC’s special China issue is now published!

The June issue of NJC, which explores chemistry in China today, follows up on the NJC Editorial Board’s visit to Hong Kong, Shanghai and Beijing last year.

 This issue includes 3 Perspective reviews and 24 original research papers, covering a wide range of topics in chemistry, as befits the broad scope of New Journal of Chemistry.

The Perspectives review progress in the areas of:
* fluorescent chemosensors based on fluorenes (by the groups of Ping Lu and Yanguang Wang of Zhejiang University);
* hydroxylation of benzene using molecular sieve-based catalysts (by the groups of Tao Jiang and Buxing Han at the IC-CAS in Beijing);
* blue phosphorescent dyes for OLEDs (by the groups of Cheuk-Lam Ho and Wai-Yeung Wong at Hong Kong Baptist University).

“Fluorescent chemosensors based on 9-cycloheptatrienylidene fluorenes (9-CHFs)” by Binbin Hu, Ping Lu and Yanguang Wang, New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 1645-1653. DOI: 10.1039/C2NJ41063J
“Catalytic hydroxylation of benzene to phenol with hydrogen peroxide using catalysts based on molecular sieves” by Tao Jiang, Weitao Wang and Buxing Han, New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 1654-1664. DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ41163J
“Small-molecular blue phosphorescent dyes for organic light-emitting devices” by Cheuk-Lam Ho and Wai-Yeung Wong, New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 1665-1683. DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ00170A

The work of two other groups is featured on the covers:
* polypyridine complexes as sensors for nitric oxide (a contribution from the group of Kenneth Kam-Wing Lo at City University of Hong Kong) are presented on the outside front cover in a depiction of the traditional fire dragon dance;
* naphthalene diimides for organic n-type semiconductors (work done by the group of Deqing Zhang at the IC-CAS in Beijing) are highlighted the inside front cover.

“Rhenium(I) polypyridine complexes functionalized with a diaminoaromatic moiety as phosphorescent sensors for nitric oxide” by Alex Wing-Tat Choi, Che-Shan Poon, Hua-Wei Liu, Heung-Kiu Cheng and Kenneth Kam-Wing Lo, New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 1711-1719. DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ00033H
“New core-expanded naphthalene diimides with different functional groups for air-stable solution-processed organic n-type semiconductors” by Xin Chen, Jianguo Wang, Guanxin Zhang, Zitong Liu, Wei Xu and Deqing Zhang, New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 1720-1727. DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ00050H

We are very thankful to the three guest editors (Vivian W.W. Yam, Xuhong Qian and Jiannian Yao) who organised this issue, and to all of the authors who submitted their papers for inclusion in this themed issue.

 

We sincerely hope that you enjoy reading this issue—let us know what you think of it!

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NJC Poster prize winners at E-WISPOC 2013

Two NJC poster prizes were awarded during the European-Winter School on Physical Organic Chemistry, which was held in Bressanone (Italy) from 27 January to 1 February 2013.

The two laureates received a one-year subscription to the journal and a RSC book. Our thanks go to the organizers of the conference for their help in organizing these awards, and our deep gratitude to all of the senior scientists who served on the jury to select the two following winners:

Giulia Iadevaia, who graduated in chemistry from the University La Sapienza in Rome and completed her Masters thesis under the supervision of Prof. Antonella Dalla Cort. During this time, she collaborated with Prof. Giulia Licini (University of Padova) and Prof. Kari Rissanen (University of Jyväskylä), where she carried out part of the work. Giulia is currently undertaking a PhD under the supervision of Prof. Christopher Hunter (University of Sheffield), studying cooperative hydrogen bonded systems. Her current research interest is in supramolecular chemistry, molecular recognition, and host-guest complexes.

Matea Vlatković was educated at the University of Zagreb. For her master research project, she moved to the University of Warsaw to work on constitutionally dynamic anion receptors with Dr. Michał Chmielewski. Matea is currently a PhD student under the supervision of Prof. Ben Feringa at the University of Groningen.  Her main research interests include organic synthesis, molecular switches, supramolecular chemistry, and catalysis. Besides her research activity, Matea enjoys dancing salsa, reading, traveling, and hiking.

NJC wishes them continuing success in their research!
A list of all previous NJC Poster Prize winners can be found here.
From left to right: Christiano Zonta, Laurent Vial, Giulia Iadevaia, Matea Vlatković, and Giulia Licini.
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Read NJC’s Themed Issue on Dendrimers

If you work with dendrimers, or are interested in learning more about these fascinating molecules, then don’t miss NJC‘s themed issue on dendrimers that has recently been published on-line (February 2012 issue).

Guest-edited by renowned expert Jean-Pierre Majoral, this Dendrimers II issue follows our highly successful first Dendrimers issue of July 2007. In his editorial prefacing this latest issue, Jean-Pierre defines the concept of “dendrimer space” (click to read it free)

The three short and topical Focus reviews look at dendrimers as bactericides, in biomedical applications and in neurodegenerative diseases. The ten longer Perspective reviews cover the synthesis and properties of dendrimers, materials that incorporate dendrimers, and a variety of applications of dendrimers in biology and medicine.

Eighteen original research works complete the issue. I’ve selected five of these contributions, highly ranked by the reviewers, as Hot Papers; these will be free to access during the month of February (just click on the DOIs below).

• 5 Hot Papers

The biodistribution of maltotriose modified PPI dendrimers, with particular attention to the BBB crossing, was studied in a collaboration of Polish and German groups, revealing that the dendrimers were able to enter rat’s important organs, including the brain.

“The biodistribution of maltotriose modified poly(propylene imine) (PPI) dendrimers conjugated with fluorescein—proofs of crossing blood–brain–barrier” by A. Janaszewska, B. Ziemba, K. Ciepluch, D. Appelhans, B. Voit, B. Klajnert and M. Bryszewska, New J. Chem., 2012, 36, 350-353. DOI: 10.1039/C1NJ20444K

The group of Rainer Haag (Freie Universität Berlin) looked at fluorous polyglycerol dendrons and dendrimers, which are used to form highly stable aggregates in the micro- to nanometer range in water.

Supramolecular behavior of fluorous polyglycerol dendrons and polyglycerol dendrimers with perfluorinated shells in water” by M. Zieringer, M. Wyszogrodzka, K. Biskup and R. Haag, New J. Chem., 2012, 36, 402-406. DOI: 10.1039/C1NJ20741E

Steven Zimmerman (University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign), in collaboration with Rainer Haag, used hyperbranched polyglycerols to solubilize perylenediimide (PDI) and improve its fluorescent properties.

“Synthesis and properties of fluorescent dyes conjugated to hyperbranched polyglycerols” by A. T. Zill, K. Licha, R. Haag and S. C. Zimmerman, New J. Chem., 2012, 36, 419-427. DOI: 10.1039/C1NJ20476A

In the contribution by Bertrand Donnio and colleagues at the IPCMS in Strasbourg, two libraries of segmented block co-dendritic supermolecules bearing semi-fluorinated chains and lipophilic poly(benzyl ether)-based wedges form unusual liquid crystalline mesophases, whose supramolecular organization is tuned by the dendritic connectivity of both compartments.

“Self-assembly and liquid-crystalline supramolecular organizations of semifluorinated block co-dendritic supermolecules” by I. Bury, B. Heinrich, C. Bourgogne, G. H. Mehl, D. Guillon and B. Donnio, New J. Chem., 2012, 36, 452-468. DOI: 10.1039/C1NJ20530G

A self-assembly strategy allowing the generation of homo- and hetero-nuclear metallodendritic materials is the result of a joint effort by several American groups at the University of Akron and Louisiana State University.

“Shape-persistent, ruthenium(II)- and iron(II)-bisterpyridine metallodendrimers: synthesis, traveling-wave ion-mobility mass spectrometry, and photophysical properties” by J.-L. Wang, X. Li, C. D. Shreiner, X. Lu, C. N. Moorefield, S. R. Tummalapalli, D. A. Medvetz, M. J. Panzner, F. R. Fronczek, C. Wesdemiotis and G. R. Newkome, New J. Chem., 2012, 36, 484-491. DOI: 10.1039/C2NJ20799K

Take a look at these hot papers while they are free to all, this month only!

• About the Covers

The paper by J.-L. Wang et al. is also the subject of the outside cover (shown at the top) featuring windmills and dendrimers, while the inside front cover (at right) illustrates the Perspective review by French researchers in Strasbourg and Lyon on dendrimers in medical imaging .

“Dendrimers in nuclear medical imaging” by C. Ghobril, G. Lamanna, M. Kueny-Stotz, A. Garofalo, C. Billotey and D. Felder-Flesch, New J. Chem., 2012, 36, 310-323. DOI: 10.1039/C1NJ20416E (available to subscribers only)

We invite you to browse the issue here, and if you are a subscriber, to read more about dendrimers from the world’s experts in the field. Enjoy!

Click to subscribe to NJC.

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Presentation of NJC issue to Didier Astruc

At the beginning of December I made the trip to Bordeaux to participate in a 2-day symposium that brought together many of the authors who contributed to the NJC issue in honor of Didier Astruc.

Former co-workers, current colleagues, friends from around the world were there, including Prof. Hiroshi Nishihara (who incidentally provided the artwork for the inside front cover to accompany his article in the October issue) and Dr. Yves Chauvin, who spoke at the presentation of this NJC issue to Didier.

From left to right: Yves Chauvin, Denise Parent, Didier Astruc, Jean-René Hamon

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Symposium in honour of Prof. Didier Astruc

Many of the authors who contributed to the October 2011 NJC issue in honour of Didier Astruc will gather in Bordeaux next month to recognise Didier’s outstanding contributions to chemistry.

The International Symposium on Coordination Chemistry and Molecular Materials, will be hosted by the University of Bordeaux 1 on December 1st and 2nd.

In addition to the scientific lectures covering a wide range of topics, Henri Kagan and Jean-Pierre Sauvage will present “Grand Public” lectures and a “Grand Public” discussion will be held with Yves Chauvin (2005 Nobel Laureate).

Yves Chauvin will also present Didier Astruc with a copy of the NJC issue in his honour, in the presence of the guest editors (Jean-René Hamon, Jean-Yves Saillard, Jaime Ruiz Aranzaes) and NJC editor Denise Parent.

All details and the full program are on the conference website.

Attendance is free, but you need to register by Friday, November 18th!

We hope to see you there!

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Meet Our Authors: October 2011 (Part 1: Collaborators)

Since the October issue of NJC is dedicated to Didier Astruc, we asked some of the contributors to share their souvenirs of Didier with us.

The first group of authors, highlighted in this article, are former collaborators of Didier. In a companion article, we’ll talk with some of his scientific friends.

Marie-Hélène Delville, a CNRS researcher at the ICMCB in Bordeaux, first met Didier Astruc in Rennes, in June 1981. He proposed that she spend one month in his group. This “short” visit ended with a thesis and a CNRS position in 1985 when the group moved to Bordeaux. Marie-Hélène stayed 11 more years with Didier and then moved on to develop her own research activity on hybrid multifunctional nanoparticles and their applications in biology and energy efficiency.

Building on a solid chemistry background from her university studies,  Marie-Hélène says that Didier “gave me the opportunity to enter this fabulous world of organometallic chemistry—a hybrid chemistry mixing up organic chemistry and metals at the Angstrom level.”

Her best souvenir of Didier dates from 1989, when both received awards:  the German-French Humboldt Award for him and the French CNRS bronze medal for her.


Stéphane Rigaut
, currently professor of chemistry at the University of Rennes 1, obtained his Ph.D. thesis under the joint direction of Didier and Marie-Hélène. With them, Stéphane discovered organometallic and  physical chemistry, and the perfect association of both. His research activity is now concentrated on multifunctional molecular wires and switches including redox active carbon-rich organometallics.

Stéphane’s most vivid memory of Didier sheds light on the latter’s insight: “During my Ph.D., we observed an unexpected and strange reaction that he immediately connected to a complicated succession of steps including electron transfers and oxygen activations. Further studies showed that he was totally right!”

Beatriz Alonso Garrido is an Associate Professor in the Inorganic Chemistry Department of the Autonoma University of Madrid. She spent the year 1999 as a postdoctoral fellow in Didier’s laboratory and they have remained in contact since then, united by their common interest in organometallic redox-active macromolecules (dendrimers and polymers).  In particular, Beatriz works on the development of their applications as sensors and biosensors.

Of her experience in Bordeaux, Beatriz notes that she had the opportunity to get a deeper insight into organic and organometallic synthesis as well as in the field of dendrimers. In addition, Beatriz says that “Didier allowed me to grow in two spaces: research and academic interests giving me valuable knowledge in both worlds. I am really grateful to him for placing his trust in me to co-translate his textbook “Chimie Organométallique” from French to Spanish.”

French gastronomy mixes well with chemistry in Beatriz’s interactions with Didier: long talks on chemistry around a table with a good French meal and a nice bottle of Bordeaux.

Our authors briefly comment their contributions to the dedicated issue:

Electrochromic devices based on in situ polymerised EDOT and Prussian Blue: influence of transparent conducting oxide and electrolyte composition—towards up-scaling by Sandrine Duluard, Ayse Celik-Cochet, Iyad Saadeddin, Anne Labouret, Guy Campet, Gerhard Schottner, Uwe Posset and Marie-Helene Delville, New J. Chem., 2011, 35, 2314-2321. DOI: 10.1039/C1NJ20231F

This paper is significant in the sense that it explicitly shows how the combination of polymer chemistry (flexible substrate and conducting layer), inorganic chemistry (indium tin oxide transparent conducting layer) and coordination chemistry (Prussian blue layer) can synergistically work to provide flexible electrochromic devices that can be darkened or lightened electronically. Automatic control of the amount of light and heat that passes through windows is achieved, such that these windows can be used as energy-saving devices.

Redox-active ruthenium(II) σ-arylacetylide wires for molecular electronics incorporating insulating chains by Ahmed Benameur, Pierre Brignou, Emmanuel Di Piazza, Yves-Marie Hervault, Lucie Norel and Stéphane Rigaut, New J. Chem., 2011, 35, 2105-2113. DOI: 10.1039/C1NJ20235A

Because molecular wires display properties strongly connected to their structure, carbon-rich metal complexes allowing intramolecular electron transfer with easily accessible redox states are of special interest to understand charge transport through molecular wires on the molecular length in metal—molecule—metal junctions.

Carbosilane based dendritic cores functionalized with interacting ferrocenyl units: synthesis and electrocatalytical properties by José Losada, Pilar García-Armada, Víctor Robles, Ángel M. Martínez, Carmen M. Casado and Beatriz Alonso, New J. Chem., 2011, 35, 2187-2195. DOI: 10.1039/C1NJ20190E

This contribution describes the synthesis of two carbosilane dendritic cores functionalized with eight electronically communicating ferrocenyl moieties. Platinum electrodes modified with electrodeposited films of these two dendrimers exhibit electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of oxygen and both oxidation and reduction of hydrogen peroxide.

For the full list of articles comprising this dedicated issue, click here!

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Meet Our Authors: October 2011 (Part 2: Friends)

Since the October issue of NJC is dedicated to Didier Astruc, we asked some of the contributors to share their souvenirs of Didier with us.

The authors highlighted in this article are some of Didier’s scientific friends. In a companion article, we talked with three former collaborators.

Holger Butenschön is a Professor at Leibniz University in Hannover, working in the fields of organic and organometallic chemistry.

Holger first met Didier at an organometallic chemistry conference in Gera, Germany, in the summer of 1990. He recalls that “We had a good time together with Peter Vollhardt and others.” They met on several other occasions, including during the summer holidays that Holger spent with his family near Bordeaux. The last time their paths crossed was in Düsseldorf at a ferrocene conference: “this gave us the chance to share a bottle of good red wine in the hotel.”

“Didier’s work was always a valuable source of new ideas. Myself coming from organic chemistry, his way of thinking broadened my mind.” Holger clearly remembers a small detail: Didier whistles when he finds something is interesting or remarkable.

Paola Ceroni, currently Associate Professor of chemistry at the University of Bologna, studies the photochemistry of supramolecular systems and nano-objects, with particular attention devoted to photoactive dendrimers.

Paola has no direct connection with Didier, but has followed his pioneering work on dendrimers since her student days. She explains that “his research on electroactive dendrimers has been very stimulating for my research, particularly with reference to molecular batteries and electrochemical sensors with signal amplification.” Didier’s visit to Bologna in 2009, on the occasion of the joint prize of the Italian and French Chemical Societies, was the occasion for them to enjoy a walking tour of the city.

Hiroshi Nishihara is Professor of chemistry and Vice Dean of the School of Science of the University of Tokyo. His research centers on the creation of new electro-, photo-, and magneto-functional materials based on transition metal complexes, donor-acceptor conjugated systems, and/or metal nanoparticles.

Hiroshi and Didier have a very close relationship, dating back to their meeting in 1998 at the first Chianti Meeting on Inorganic Electrochemistry (ChiMIE). Hiroshi was from the start much impressed by Didier’s intellectual knowledge and wonderful personality, and has appreciated the valuable advice given by Didier. “Discussion with him is always encouraging and gives me new ideas.”

The two friends have met many times since on various occasions. Hiroshi in particular recalls trips together to beautiful and historical places, such as Maui. Hiroshi has visited Didier in Bordeaux four times, and Didier has reciprocated with stays in Tokyo on two occasions. In addition, each has welcomed a student from his colleague’s group: Marie-Christine Daniel went to Tokyo while Tetsuro Kusamoto spent time in Bordeaux.

Our authors briefly comment their contributions to the dedicated issue:

New cyclopentadienylethylphosphane chelate complexes with unsymmetrical phosphane substitution by Karin Janssen (née Kirleis) and Holger Butenschön, New J. Chem., 2011, 35, 2287-2298. DOI: 10.1039/C1NJ20292H

While cyclopentadienylalkylphosphane chelate complexes with two identical substituents at phosphorus have been widely investigated, our contribution presents the first cobalt chelates with different substituents at phosphorus. This causes some asymmetry and gives an insight into the through-space interactions of the substituents with the other ligands present in the complex.

Designing light harvesting antennas by luminescent dendrimers by Vincenzo Balzani, Giacomo Bergamini, Paola Ceroni and Enrico Marchi, New J. Chem., 2011, 35, 1944-1954. DOI: 10.1039/C1NJ20142E

Dendrimers are macromolecules with extraordinary properties: their aesthetically pleasing structures enable a controlled organization of different functional units. This is a prerequisite to build up an efficient molecular antenna, in which the light absorbed by the peripheral units is funneled to a common acceptor by a sequence of energy transfer steps. Applications of these systems to the conversion of solar energy into electricity or fuels as well as sensors with signal amplification are envisaged.

Synthesis of photo-switchable 3-FcAB-modified polymer particles by Kosuke Namiki, Masaki Murata, Shoko Kume and Hiroshi Nishihara, New J. Chem., 2011, 35, 2146-2152. DOI: 10.1039/C1NJ20189A

We introduced 3-ferrocenylazobenze to the polymer particles and succeeded in reversible trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene moiety by green light irradiation combined with redox reaction of the ferrocene moiety. This result can lead to developing a photo-switching system using spectroscopic detection of the isomerization behaviors of nano-dots.

For the full list of articles comprising this dedicated issue, click here!

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NJC Themed Issue 10 online – in honor of Prof. Didier Astruc

NJC is delighted to introduce this issue in honor of Didier Astruc, on the occasion of his 65th birthday. The outside front cover highlights molecules from 5 of the articles in this issue, placed on a background of grape leaves and vineyards (in honor of Didier’s Bordeaux location).

We’ve invited his colleagues, Jean-René Hamon, Jean-Yves Saillard and Jaime Ruiz, to introduce this special issue and highlight Didier’s many outstanding scientific achievements in a wide range of research areas, including organometallic chemistry, catalysis, molecular chemistry, dendrimers and nanostructures.

Introduction to the themed issue in honour of Prof. Didier Astruc. A success story from electron reservoir complexes to dendritic molecular nanostructures, New J. Chem., 2011, 35, 1931-1932; DOI: 10.1039/C1NJ90032C

The articles presented in this themed issue of NJC address recent developments in material science, cancer research, organometallic complexes, metallodendrimers and preparation of nanostructures, amongst other themes. New ideas are presented, some long-held views are strengthened and others are questioned.

In all, there are 56 articles including 2 Focuses, 4 Perspectives, 6 Letters and 44 Full papers. The high quality of research presented exemplifies what scientists are able to achieve, and Didier Astruc certainly occupies a leading position among them.

Some of the articles in this themed issue:

A new series of ferrocifen derivatives, bearing two aminoalkyl chains, with strong antiproliferative effects on breast cancer cells; Pascal Pigeon, Siden Top, Anne Vessières, Michel Huché, Meral Görmen, Mehdi El Arbi, Marie-Aude Plamont, Michael J. McGlinchey and Gérard Jaouen; New J. Chem., 2011, 35, 2212-2218; DOI: 10.1039/C1NJ20192A

Synthesis of spin crossover nano-objects with different morphologies and properties; Alexey Tokarev, Lionel Salmon, Yannick Guari, Gábor Molnár and Azzedine Bousseksou; New J. Chem., 2011, 35, 2081-2088 DOI:10.1039/C1NJ20218A

A meta-xylenediamide macrocycle containing rotaxane anion host system constructed by a new synthetic clipping methodology; Nicholas H. Evans, Christopher J. Serpell and Paul D. Beer; New J. Chem., 2011, 35, 2047-2053; DOI: 10.1039/C1NJ20109C

The inside front cover by Hiroshi Nishihara and co-workers (University of Tokyo) represents their work on 3-ferrocenylazobenzene (3-FcAB) containing polymer particles, envisioning their potential application to act as nano-sized photo-memories or switches.

Synthesis of photo-switchable 3-FcAB-modified polymer particles by Kosuke Namiki, Masaki Murata, Shoko Kume and Hiroshi Nishihara; New J. Chem., 2011, 35, 2146-2152; DOI: 10.1039/C1NJ20189A

A symposium in honor of Didier Astruc will be held in Bordeaux (December 1–2, 2011) at which Yves Chauvin (2005 Nobel Laureate) will present this themed issue to Didier. The two-day symposium program will include plenary lectures by Henri Kagan and Jean-Pierre Sauvage, 25 other lectures, as well as a Grand Public discussion with Yves Chauvin.

Don’t miss the October themed Issue 10, available online!

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Exploring the nanoscale properties of spin crossover materials

In this collaborative work from the universities of Toulouse and Montpellier (France), Lionel Salmon, Azzedine Bousseksou and co-workers have built on their development of synthetic routes to spin crossover compound (SCO) nanoparticles, to investigate the structure-property relashionships of the various nano-objects morphologies, be it as dispersed colloids, fibrous structures or nanoparticle powders.

Amongst other findings, their work now shows that the cooperativity of spin crossover transition does not require that the complex is in solid state, and that even ultra-small (down to 3 nm) spin crossover nanoparticles can exhibit a cooperative transition, offering interesting perspectives for practical applications of SCO compounds.

Interested in reading further? Why not download the full article now, FREE to access for a period of 4 weeks!

Synthesis of spin crossover nano-objects with different morphologies and properties
Alexey Tokarev, Lionel Salmon, Yannick Guari, Gábor Molnár and Azzedine Bousseksou
New J. Chem., 2011, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C1NJ20218A, Paper

This article will be part of the themed issue of NJC honouring the life and work of Prof. Didier Astruc, on the occasion of his 65th birthday – Coming soon.

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