Archive for the ‘Perspectives’ Category

NJC issue 11 out now

This month, our five Guest Editors Michel Camplo, Jean-Manuel Raimundo, Laurence Navailles, Mark W. Grinstaff and Philippe Barthélémy present the seven reviews and ten articles which reflect the scope of bioinspired systems in supramolecular chemistry and nanotechnology (SupraBio) today in this themed collection.

NJC Nov 2014 OFC Ariga-Hill

Jonathan Hill designed this month’s outside cover to present the Perspective review by Dr Katsuhiko Ariga (National Institute for Materials Science, Japan) and his co-workers, and which is part of the themed issue. The authors propose an important paradigm shift in the preparation of functional materials with well-designed nanostructures, moving from a nanotechnological to a nanoarchitectonic approach.

They focus on examples involving drug delivery functions, which are promising applications of bioinspired materials research. In the review the team discusses recent developments involving assemblies of small amphiphilic molecules, polymer micelles and molecular conjugates and give examples of challenging concepts, including inorganic nanostructure design for drug delivery and mechanically controlled drug release. The authors come to the conclusion that bioinspired nanoarchitectonics can be utilized not only in drug delivery applications but also in many research fields, for which they open tremendous possibilities.

Bioinspired nanoarchitectonics as emerging drug delivery systems
Katsuhiko Ariga, Kohsaku Kawakami, Mitsuhiro Ebara, Yohei Kotsuchibashi, Qingmin Ji and Jonathan P. Hill.
New J. Chem., 2014, 38, 5149-5163. DOI: 10.1039/C4NJ00864B.

NJC Nov 2014 IFC RemitaThe inside cover illustrates an article written by Dr Hynd Remita (Université Paris-Sud, France) and her colleagues in which they present the synthesis of Au–Cu nanoparticles on a modified TiO2 support.

In this material the Au–Cu bimetallic nanoparticles, acting as efficient electron scavengers, enhance the photocatalytic activity under UV light. The photocatalytic properties of the modified TiO2 have also been studied for photodegradation of methyl orange. According to the authors, these materials can also have applications in catalysis.

Radiolytic synthesis of Au–Cu bimetallic nanoparticles supported on TiO2: application in photocatalysis
Zibin Hai, Nadia EL Kolli, Jiafu Chen and Hynd Remita.
New J. Chem., 2014, 38 5279-5286. DOI: 10.1039/C4NJ00883A.

We invite you to browse the complete table of contents (68 articles and reviews) of this issue to discover other interesting results.

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NJC issue 8 out now

Aug OFC by Prof. YamauchiOur outside cover, designed by Prof. Yamauchi (National Institute for Materials Science, Japan) and his colleagues, presents a Focus article dedicated to mesoporous fibers.

The authors review several works on non-siliceous mesoporous fibers synthesized with both soft- and hard-templates. They also discuss the orientation control of the mesochannels inside the fibers, which is important for considering the adsorption and diffusion of molecules, and they introduce their recent works on the novel synthesis of mesoporous fibers.

Recent progress on the tailored synthesis of various mesoporous fibers toward practical applications
Norihiro Suzuki, Jian Liu and Yusuke Yamauchi.
New J. Chem., 2014, 38, 3330-3335. DOI: 10.1039/C4NJ00016A.

Aug IFC by Dr ChahmaThe inside cover illustrates a paper by Dr Chahma (Laurentian University, Canada) and his co-workers in which they  describe the characterization of interactions between a free amino acid and chiral conducting surfaces using cyclic voltammetry and FTIR spectroscopy.

They report that being able to control the functionalities on conducting surfaces can help tune the chemical and electrochemical properties of the modified surfaces, thereby affecting the detectability of immobilized molecules on them.

Characterization of phenomena occurring at the interface of chiral conducting surfaces
M’hamed Chahma, Christopher D. McTiernan and Sara A. Abbas.
New J. Chem., 2014, 38, 3379-3385. DOI: 10.1039/C4NJ00489B.

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The second Focus article is written by Dr Nicolas Giuseppone (University of Strasbourg) and co-workers in which they present how chromatographic, spectroscopic, and microscopic techniques, as well as theoretical modelling and statistical data treatment, are instrumental in the new research area of dynamic combinatorial systems, a significant area at the interface of molecular biology and materials science. The authors illustrate the advantages of a number of experimental and theoretical methods by a non-exhaustive review of examples from the recent literature.

Experimental and theoretical methods for the analyses of dynamic combinatorial libraries
Maria Cristina Misuraca, Emilie Moulin, Yves Ruffa and Nicolas Giuseppone.
New J. Chem., 2014, 38, 3336-3349. DOI: 10.1039/C4NJ00304G.

To find out more, access the full issue

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Your Vacation Reading from NJC

The August issue of New Journal of Chemistry contains 50 articles for your summer reading enjoyment.

Bi-polar states of solid matter.

Among the highlights of this issue, don’t miss the latest Focus review, by the group of Jürg Hulliger at the University of Bern in Switzerland. Using condensed matter theory, the key message that molecular solids can end up in bi-polar states has implications for tissue formation, function and repair. This is an interesting example of how findings in one field might lead to breakthroughs in a very different field.

A stochastic principle behind polar properties of condensed molecular matter by Jürg Hulliger, Thomas Wüst, Khadidja Brahimi, Matthias Burgener and Hanane Aboulfadl, New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 2229-2235. DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ40935J

Cover for the work of Mikata et al.

The outside and inside front covers feature highly ranked works. This month the striking outside front cover was proposed by the group of Yuji Mikata from Nara Women’s University in Japan. They achieved OFF-ON, ratiometric or ON-OFF responses towards mercury and iron cations by modifying the substitution pattern on their basic molecular skeleton.

Thioether-tethered bisquinoline derivatives as fluorescent probes for mercury(II) and iron(III) ions by Yuji Mikata, Fumie Nakagaki and Kaori Nakanishi, New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 2236-2240. DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ00233K

Cover for the work of Andruh and collaborators.

A collaborative effort by several groups in Romania and France is featured on the inside front cover. They determined the crystal structures and studied the magnetic and photophysical properties of sixteen 3d–4f Schiff-base complexes. The interaction between the two metal ions lead to interesting effects on the properties.

A new synthetic route towards binuclear 3d–4f complexes, using non-compartmental ligands derived from o-vanillin. Syntheses, crystal structures, magnetic and luminescent properties by Masood Sarwar, Augustin M. Madalan, Carmen Tiseanu, Ghenadie Novitchi, Catalin Maxim, Gabriela Marinescu, Dominique Luneau and Marius Andruh, New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 2280-2292. DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ00199G

Stay abreast of the latest research with NJC! Sign up for the free E-Alert to get the table of contents in your mailbox each month.

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NJC’s special China issue is now published!

The June issue of NJC, which explores chemistry in China today, follows up on the NJC Editorial Board’s visit to Hong Kong, Shanghai and Beijing last year.

 This issue includes 3 Perspective reviews and 24 original research papers, covering a wide range of topics in chemistry, as befits the broad scope of New Journal of Chemistry.

The Perspectives review progress in the areas of:
* fluorescent chemosensors based on fluorenes (by the groups of Ping Lu and Yanguang Wang of Zhejiang University);
* hydroxylation of benzene using molecular sieve-based catalysts (by the groups of Tao Jiang and Buxing Han at the IC-CAS in Beijing);
* blue phosphorescent dyes for OLEDs (by the groups of Cheuk-Lam Ho and Wai-Yeung Wong at Hong Kong Baptist University).

“Fluorescent chemosensors based on 9-cycloheptatrienylidene fluorenes (9-CHFs)” by Binbin Hu, Ping Lu and Yanguang Wang, New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 1645-1653. DOI: 10.1039/C2NJ41063J
“Catalytic hydroxylation of benzene to phenol with hydrogen peroxide using catalysts based on molecular sieves” by Tao Jiang, Weitao Wang and Buxing Han, New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 1654-1664. DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ41163J
“Small-molecular blue phosphorescent dyes for organic light-emitting devices” by Cheuk-Lam Ho and Wai-Yeung Wong, New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 1665-1683. DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ00170A

The work of two other groups is featured on the covers:
* polypyridine complexes as sensors for nitric oxide (a contribution from the group of Kenneth Kam-Wing Lo at City University of Hong Kong) are presented on the outside front cover in a depiction of the traditional fire dragon dance;
* naphthalene diimides for organic n-type semiconductors (work done by the group of Deqing Zhang at the IC-CAS in Beijing) are highlighted the inside front cover.

“Rhenium(I) polypyridine complexes functionalized with a diaminoaromatic moiety as phosphorescent sensors for nitric oxide” by Alex Wing-Tat Choi, Che-Shan Poon, Hua-Wei Liu, Heung-Kiu Cheng and Kenneth Kam-Wing Lo, New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 1711-1719. DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ00033H
“New core-expanded naphthalene diimides with different functional groups for air-stable solution-processed organic n-type semiconductors” by Xin Chen, Jianguo Wang, Guanxin Zhang, Zitong Liu, Wei Xu and Deqing Zhang, New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 1720-1727. DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ00050H

We are very thankful to the three guest editors (Vivian W.W. Yam, Xuhong Qian and Jiannian Yao) who organised this issue, and to all of the authors who submitted their papers for inclusion in this themed issue.

 

We sincerely hope that you enjoy reading this issue—let us know what you think of it!

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NJC Issue 4 out now !

We invite you to visit the April issue of NJC.




A perspective article by B. L. V. Prasad and D. S. Sidhaye (National Chemical laboratory, Pune, India) features on this month’s front cover. In this review article, the digestive ripening procedure is reviewed, discussed and its utility spanning the preparation of monodispersed nanoparticles, alloy nanoparticles, superlattice structures and the most interesting nano-machining is demonstrated.

Many manifestations of digestive ripening: monodispersity, superlattices and nanomachining, Deepti S. Sidhaye and B. L. V. Prasad, New J. Chem., 2011, 35, 755-763, DOI: 10.1039/C0NJ00359J (Perspective)




The inside cover was produced by R. Beckert and W. J. Baader and co-workers (a collaboration from teams in Germany and Brazil), presenting an uphill energy conversion process using 1, 2-dioxetanes.

Chemiluminescence-based uphill energy conversion, Luiz Francisco Monteiro Leite Ciscato, Dieter Weiss, Rainer Beckert, Erick Leite Bastos, Fernando Heering Bartoloni and Wilhelm Josef Baader, New J. Chem., 2011, 35, 773-775, DOI: 10.1039/C0NJ00843E (Letter, Hot paper)



In this issue, also check out :

• the perspective article by D. Astruc on the assembly, properties, functions and multiple applications of ferrocenyl dendrimers from small to giant sizes.

Ferrocenyl dendrimers: multi-electron redox reagents and their applications, Didier Astruc, New J. Chem., 2011, 35, 764-772, DOI: 10.1039/C0NJ00875C (Perspective)

You can access and read the whole issue 4 here.

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Read the latest NJC Perspectives

Stay up-to-date with these 5 latest NJC Perspectives , all available as advance articles on the web.

  • Read about multiple-decker sandwich complexes containing lanthanide and actinide metals with Frank Edelmann’s article
  • Gain insights into the digestive ripening method, providing access to highly monodispersed nanoparticles as featured by Deepti S. Sidhaye and B. L. V. Prasad
  • Explore the technique of hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments in the high vacuum of a mass spectrometer to unravel the structural aspects and the gas-phase reactivity of supramolecular complexes, as detailed by Christoph A. Schalley and coworkers
  • Take a tour of the assembly, properties, functions and multiple applications of ferrocenyl dendrimers, as reviewed by Didier Astruc.
  • Delve into rare earths, jewels for functional materials of the future, by Jean-Claude G. Bünzli et al.

 

                      Multiple-decker sandwich complexes of f-elements
                      Frank T. Edelmann
                      New J. Chem., 2011, Advance Article
                      DOI: 10.1039/C0NJ00672F, Perspective

Many manifestations of digestive ripening: monodispersity, superlattices and nanomachining
Deepti S. Sidhaye and B. L. V. Prasad,
New J. Chem., 2011, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C0NJ00359J, Perspective

Gas-phase H/D-exchange experiments in supramolecular chemistry
Henrik D. F. Winkler, Egor V. Dzyuba and Christoph A. Schalley
New J. Chem., 2011, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C0NJ00634C, Perspective

Ferrocenyl dendrimers: multi-electron redox reagents and their applications
Didier Astruc
New J. Chem., 2011, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C0NJ00875C, Perspective

Rare earths: jewels for functional materials of the future
Svetlana V. Eliseeva and Jean-Claude G. Bünzli
New J. Chem., 2011, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C0NJ00969E, Perspective

Fancy submitting an article to NJC? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us your suggestions.

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NJC Issue 2, 2011 now published

We welcome you to NJC‘s February issue, out now.

A Perspective article by Kenneth Kam-Wing Lo and coworkers (University of Hong-Kong) features on this month’s front cover.  In this review article, find out on  some recent examples of luminescent iridium(III) polypyridine complexes as probes for chemical and biological molecules. The targets include proton, cations and anions, small molecules, nucleic acids, protein molecules and cellular structures.

Development of luminescent iridium(III) polypyridine complexes as chemical and biological probes, Kenneth Kam-Wing Lo, Steve Po-Yam Li and Kenneth Yin Zhang, New J. Chem., 2011, 35, 265-287, DOI: 10.1039/C0NJ00478B Perspective


The inside front cover showcases the work of V. Haridas et al. (a collaboration from teams in Australia and India), presenting  a new class of peptide-based dendrons and dendrimers that display unique vesicle-driven organogelation.

Gelation and topochemical polymerization of peptide dendrimers, V. Haridas, Yogesh K. Sharma, Rhiannon Creasey, Srikanta Sahu, Christopher T. Gibson and Nicolas H. Voelcker, New J. Chem., 2011, 35, 303-309, DOI: 10.1039/C0NJ00544D, Paper

  • In this issue, also check out our very second FOCUS article, NJC‘s  new and exciting highlight format, this month on macroporous monoliths and their use as catalytic microreactors:

Monolithic flow microreactors improve fine chemicals synthesis, Alexander Sachse, Anne Galarneau, Bernard Coq and François Fajula, New J. Chem., 2011, 35, 259-264, DOI: 10.1039/C0NJ00965B, Focus

You can access and read the whole issue 2 of NJC here. Leave us a comment and let us know what you think!

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NJC Perspectives

Check out NJC’s two latest Perspectives now available as advance articles on the web:

Kenneth Kam-Wing Lo and colleagues (City University of Hong-Kong) review recent progress on luminescent iridium(III) polypyridine complexes as probes for chemical and biological molecules using different strategies. The targets include protons, cations and anions, small molecules, nucleic acids, protein molecules. Additionally, the use of these complexes as bioimaging reagents and cellular probes is also highlighted.

Development of luminescent iridium(III) polypyridine complexes as chemical and biological probes, Kenneth Kam-Wing Lo, Steve Po-Yam Li and Kenneth Yin Zhang, New J. Chem., 2011, Adance article, DOI: 10.1039/C0NJ00478B, Perspective


Digestive ripening is addressed by Deepti S. Sidhaye and B. L. V. Prasad in their Perspective entitled: ‘Many manifestations of digestive ripening: monodispersity, superlattices and nanomachining‘, in which the authors provide insights into the digestive ripening method, where simply refluxing a surface active molecule—the digestive ripening agent—with a polydispersed nanoparticle system in an appropriate solvent leads to the formation of highly monodispersed nanoparticles, proving its utility in many new nanoparticle synthetic avenues.

Many manifestations of digestive ripening: monodispersity, superlattices and nanomachining, Deepti S. Sidhaye and B. L. V. Prasad, New J. Chem., 2011, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C0NJ00359J, Perspective

Interested? Then why not read these Perspectives today and let us know your thoughts and comments below.

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NJC Issue 12 now published

In the December issue, find out more on the latest science published in NJC, featuring an NJC Opinion on molecular set-reset memories by  Uwe Pischel and Joakim Andréasson,  2 Perspectives highlighting calixarenes from different angles, and much more in the other 38 articles!

The outside front cover features the Perspective by Kaisa Helttunen (University of Jyväskylä) and Patrick Shahgaldian (University of Applied Science Northwestern Switzerland) who present the developments of the chemistry of amphiphilic calixarenes and resorcinarenes with a clear focus on the synthetic paths used for their production and their self-assembly properties in water.

Self-assembly of amphiphilic calixarenes and resorcinarenes in water, Kaisa Helttunen and Patrick Shahgaldian, New J. Chem., 2010, 34, 2704-2714 DOI:10.1039/C0NJ00123F





The inside front cover presents work by Janet Blümel et al. on novel linkers for immobilized catalysts. The Rh catalysts immobilized by a rigid linker scaffold, characterized by 119Sn MAS and X-ray analysis, cannot dimerize or touch the silica surface. The batches are recycled 30 times! Deciphering the cover artwork, the substrate and product are in the “liquid phase”, while the catalyst is like a palm or mangrove tree on an island, and cannot dimerize or hang down into the sand. The hydrogen for the catalytic reaction rides in as a cloud, while the Cl of the Wilkinson-type complex features the coconut.

New Linker Systems for Superior Immobilized Catalysts, Björn Beele, Johannes Guenther, Melanie Perera, Michaela Stach, Thomas Oeser and Janet Blüme New J. Chem. 2010, 34, 2729-2731 DOI: 10.1039/C0NJ00482K

We hope you enjoy this issue!

If you fancy submitting an article to New Journal of Chemistry, then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us your suggestions.

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October 2010 issue of NJC published

You can now browse the October issue of NJC on the website. The cover highlights a Perspective, by Andreas Schnepf at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, which reviews a novel class of cluster compounds in group 14 chemistry, exemplified by GenRm, to explore the transition from molecular to bulk properties.

Metalloid cluster compounds of germanium: novel structural motives on the way to elemental germanium! by Andreas Schnepf*
New J. Chem., 2010, 34, 2079-2092; DOI:10.1039/C0NJ00263A

We invite you to also take a look at some of the 34 other papers in this issue, covering topics as diverse as: gelation phenomena, sensors, water purification, drug uptake & release, mesoporous & nano materials, catalysis & reaction mechanisms, ionic liquids, aromatic sextet theory, conjugates for tumor imaging, molecular clusters, cyclophanes & cyclodextrins, lectin binding, dendrimers in DSSCs, purification of carbon nanotubes, organic synthesis, partitioning in biphasic systems, optically active supramolecules, paramagnetic complexes.

Why not sign-up for our table of contents e-alerts today to receive NJC issues direct to your inbox?

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