Archive for the ‘Perspectives’ Category

NJC issue 11 now online

NJC Nov 16 OFC - Dr ChandraDr Sudeshna Chandra (NMIMS University, India) designed this month’s outside cover. It illustrates an article in which the authors propose a novel electrochemical immunosensor, based on a redox-active ferrocenyl dendrimer on a glassy carbon electrode, for the detection of cancer biomarkers.

Fabrication of a label-free electrochemical immunosensor using a redox active ferrocenyl dendrimer
Sudeshna Chandra, Christian Gäbler, Christian Schliebe, Heinrich Lang and Dhirendra Bahadur,  New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 9046-9053. DOI: 10.1039/C6NJ00830E.

NJC Nov 16 IFC - Dr Jelinek

The inside cover is proposed by Dr Raz Jelinek (Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel). According to Dr Jelinek and his co-workers, the analysis of artworks and identification of their molecular components is very important to choose proper conservation strategies and monitor their restoration. In their study the authors present an application of spin-coated polydiacetylene films for in situ colorimetric sensing of a selection of organic materials present in paintings. Their study shows that the polydiacetylene technology might open new analytical avenues in molecular analysis, in general, and more specifically for painting restoration and conversation science.

Colorimetric analysis of painting materials using polymer-supported polydiacetylene films
Alexander Trachtenberg, Orit Malka, Kaviya Parambath Kootery, Stella Beglaryan, Danilo Malferrari, Paola Galletti, Silvia Prati, Rocco Mazzeo, Emilio Tagliavini and  Raz Jelinek, New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 9054-9059. DOI: 10.1039/C6NJ02092E.

NJC FOC Nov 16 - Dr Labarca

Also read the short Focus review by Dr Martín Labarca (Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina). Dr Labarca addresses the problem of the status of the element of atomic number zero or “neutronium”. According to him, it is more cautious from both a scientific and a philosophical standpoint, to think of the neutron just as a structural component of an element.

An element of atomic number zero?
Martín Labarca, New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 9002-9006. DOI: 10.1039/C6NJ02076C.

Browse the full table of contents of the November issue to discover the other studies conducted by our authors here.

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NJC issue 06 now online

NJC June 2016 OFC - Prof. MizunoProf. Noritaka Mizuno (The University of Tokyo, Japan) designed this month’s outside cover. It illustrates an NJC Letter in which Prof. Mizuno and his colleagues present for the first time the efficient catalytic desulfurization-oxygenation of secondary and tertiary thioamides into amides using O2 as the terminal oxidant and water as the oxygen source. Their results show that various kinds of structurally diverse thioamides could be applied to this catalytic system. They use phosphovanadomolybdic acids, possessing both acidic and oxidation properties, the key to realizing this transformation as the efficient catalytic one.

Phosphovanadomolybdic acid catalyzed desulfurization–oxygenation of secondary and tertiary thioamides into amides using molecular oxygen as the terminal oxidant, Ning Xu, Xiongjie Jin, Kosuke Suzuki, Kazuya Yamaguchi and Noritaka Mizuno, New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 4865-4869. DOI: 10.1039/C5NJ03579A.

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This month’s issue also features a Perspective review by Dr Radovan Šebesta (Comenius University in Bratislava, Slovakia) and his two co-workers, which focuses on a methodology affording diversely substituted chiral carbonyl compounds. Enamines, formed from the corresponding carbonyl compounds and appropriate chiral amine catalysts, can be oxidized to radical cation species. These radical cations can be intercepted by a range of SOMO-philic reagents, such as alkenes, arenes and some heteroatom-based reagents. They show that asymmetric singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) catalysis is a useful tool for enantioselective allylic alkylation, enolation, arylation, carbo-oxidation, vinylation, alkynylation, or intermolecular alkylation of carbonyl compounds, predominantly aldehydes. This new bond-forming methodology can find application in the construction of both natural products as well as medicinal agents.

GA - NJC 10.1039/C6NJ00079G

Enantioselective organocatalysis using SOMO activation, Mária Mečiarová, Pavol Tisovský and Radovan Šebesta, New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 4855-4864. DOI: 10.1039/C6NJ00079G.

To browse the entire table of contents of the June issue, click here. And to sign up for the free e-alerts, so as not to miss a single issue of NJC, click here.

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NJC issue 05 now online

NJC May 2016 OFC - Themed issue in honor of François FajulaThis month, Guest Editors Professors Anne Galarneau (Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier, France) and Irina I. Ivanova (M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia) are pleased to present a part-themed issue in honor of Dr François Fajula entitled The Creative World of Porous Materials.

This collection of 12 Reviews, 2 Letters and 39 research Papers expresses the materials community’s deep appreciation and conveys thanks to Dr François Fajula for his outstanding contributions to the fields of zeolites and ordered porous materials, and for his hard wok on behalf of the materials community. Additional contributions to this themed collection that are not published in the May issue can be found here as they are added.

NJC would also like to thank Alexander Yakimov and the Guest Editors for the design of the outside cover which illustrates this themed issue.

Read the Editorial here.

We invite you to browse the complete table of contents of the May issue to discover other authors’ contributions that are not part of the themed collection.

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NJC issue 4 now online

NJC April OFC - Dr ZhouThe first spring issue cover was designed by Prof. Ying Zhou (Southwest Petroleum University, China) to illustrate a study in which the authors stress the important role of hydrothermal treatment parameters for the oil remediation performance of the material.

The authors investigated the effects of various reducing agents with different temperatures and reaction times on the density, specific surface area, strength, morphology and adsorption performance of the prepared graphene aerogels. Their results provide hints to select a reducing agent to prepare a graphene aerogel for oil sorption.

Hydrothermal formation of graphene aerogel for oil sorption: the role of reducing agent, reaction time and temperature. Wenchao Wan, Fei Zhang, Shan Yu, Ruiyang Zhang and Ying Zhou, New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 3040-3046. DOI: 10.1039/C5NJ03086B.

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NJC also invites you to read the two Perspective reviews in this month’s issue:

  • Profs. Wen He and Xudong Zhang (Qilu University of Technology, China) and their co-workers focused their review of hybrid cathode materials on composites of LiFePO4 or Li3V2(PO4)3 with other lithium-metal compounds. They note the challenges still facing researchers to bring the understanding of these materials to the point where they can be used in lithium ion batteries.

Recent progress in hybrid cathode materials for lithium ion batteries. Chuanliang Wei, Wen He, Xudong Zhang, Jianxing Shen and Jingyun Ma, New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 2984-2999. DOI: 10.1039/C5NJ02212F.

  • In the second review, Prof. Moo Hwan Cho (Yeungnam University, South Korea) and his colleagues focus on the major developments in the synthesis of N-doped TiO2 and its possible applications for the photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants and environmental remediation under visible light irradiation.

Nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide (N-doped TiO2) for visible light photocatalysis. Sajid Ali Ansari, Mohammad Mansoob Khan, Mohd Omaish Ansari and Moo Hwan Cho, New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 3000-3009. DOI: 10.1039/C5NJ03478G.

Access the full issue table of contents

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NJC issue 02 now online

NJC Feb 2016 OFC - themed issue POMs-SOMsThe February issue of NJC is a part-themed one devoted to Emergent Polyoxometalates and Soft-oxometalates. The NJC team thanks all of the authors for their contributions, as well as the two Guest Editors, Professors Debbie Crans (Colorado State University, USA) and Soumyajit Roy (Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata, India). Two Perspectives, 4 Letters and 16 research papers illustrate new advances in polyoxometalate-containing systems, with emphasis on those for which non-covalent organization creates new structures with new properties.

Read the Themed Issue Editorial

NJC Feb 2016 IFC - Prof. LhotakThe inside cover is proposed by Prof. Pavel Lhoták (University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, Czech Republic) to illustrate a Paper in which the authors report on the application of organomercurial intermediates for the introduction of aryl moieties using Pd-catalyzed arylation, and for the preparation of the corresponding thiacalixarene dimers, so far unknown in thiacalixarene chemistry.

They show that their reaction enables the introduction of aryl moieties into the meta– or para-positions of the thiacalix[4]arene skeleton, thus leading to unique substitution patterns in thiacalixarene chemistry.

Arylation of thiacalix[4]arenes using organomercurial intermediates
F. Botha, V. Eigner, H. Dvořáková and P. Lhoták.
New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 1104-1110. DOI: 10.1039/C5NJ02427G.

See the full issue table of contents

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NJC issue 10 now online

NJC Oct OFC -  Prof. EldemannThis month, guest editors Professors Frank T. Edelmann (Madgeburg, Germany) and Peter Junk (James Cook University, Australia) are pleased to present a part-themed issue on ‘Frontiers of Organo-f-element Chemistry‘. The 26 contributions show that organo-f-element chemistry continues to be one of the most attractive fields for potential applications in homogeneous catalysis and organic synthesis.

As part of the Pacifichem 2015 conference in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA (December 15–20, 2015), there will be a symposium devoted to the same topic as this themed issue. This symposium will focus on recent advances and future directions in the organometallic chemistry of lanthanide and actinide elements. It is intended to cover all fundamental and technological aspects of organo-f-element chemistry.

NJC Oct IFC - Prof. Wang

Read the Editorial here

The inside cover illustrates an article by Professor Guozhong Wang (Chinese Academy of Sciences, China) and his co-workers. Focusing on removing persistent organic pollutants, the authors present a new photocatalytic degradation pathway of 2,4,4′-trichlorobiphenyl, involving the outright degradation into long-chain alkanes via ring-opening reactions, using a highly-active photocatalyst: Ag nanoparticle decorated flower-like ZnO-nanosheet-assembled ZnO microspheres.

Photocatalytic degradation of 2,4,4′-trichlorobiphenyl into long-chain alkanes using Ag nanoparticle decorated flower-like ZnO microspheres

Quan Deng, Haibin Tang, Gang Liu, Xiaoping Song, Shenhong Kang, Huimin Wang, Dickon H. L. Ng and Guozhong Wang, New J. Chem., 2015, 39, 7781-7785. DOI: 10.1039/C5NJ00343A.

Access the full issue table of contents here

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NJC issue 07 now online

NJC July 2015 OFC - Prof. MarraProfessor Alberto Marra (Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier, France) designed the outside cover of this month’s issue, based on the van Gogh painting The Mulberry Tree. In the accompanying Perspective article, Professor Marra and his co-workers review the different strategies developed to synthesize multivalent architectures, from the total synthesis of divalent iminosugars to the preparation of complex systems bearing twenty-five iminosugar units. They also compare the enzyme inhibitory properties of the various multivalent iminosugars prepared to date in order to infer the valence and the three-dimensional arrangement required for the most efficient inhibition activity.

Synthesis and biological properties of multivalent iminosugars
Renaud Zelli, Jean-François Longevial, Pascal Dumy and Alberto Marra
New J. Chem., 2015, 39, 5050-5074. DOI: 10.1039/C5NJ00462D.

Access the full table of contents of this issue here

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NJC issue 05 now online

The May issue of NJC is a part-themed one devoted to Foldamer Chemistry. The NJC team thanks all of the authors for their contribution, as well as the Guest Editor Professor David Aitken (Université Paris Sud, France). This themed issue contains a collection of 3 review articles and 14 research papers, which provide a representative state-of-the-art coverage of the high-level research being carried out in some of the main areas of foldamer research. It is appropriate that these contributions come from research groups spanning four continents, underlining the extent to which foldamers have had an impact on the scientific community.

NJC May 2015 OFC - Prof. SugaIn their review article, Professor Suga (University of Tokyo, Japan) and his colleagues, who designed the outside cover, present an overview of the structural features of stable macrocyclic peptides and their binding to protein targets. They also show some initial indications of their folding behaviour free in solution, and discuss implications for the future design and functions of foldamers.

Model foldamers: applications and structures of stable macrocyclic peptides identified using in vitro selection
Seino A. K. Jongkees, Christopher J. Hipolito, Joseph M. Rogers and Hiroaki Suga. 
New J. Chem.
, 2015, 39, 3197-3207. DOI: 10.1039/C4NJ01633E.NJC May 2015 IFC - Prof. Pophristic

The work of Professor Pophristic (University of the Sciences, USA) and co-workers is illustrated on the inside cover this month. The authors present a molecular dynamics (MD) study on a series of  helical arylamide oligomers with systematically varying building blocks and linkage types to demonstrate that the conformational characteristics of foldamers, such as the number of units per turn, helical pitch, and pore diameter, can be predicted by MD simulations of small oligomers significantly shorter than the foldamers in question.

Helical arylamide foldamers: structure prediction by molecular dynamics simulations
Zhiwei Liu, Ara M. Abramyan and Vojislava Pophristic.
New J. Chem., 2015, 39, 3229-3240. DOI: 10.1039/C4NJ01925C.

Click here to discover the other articles of the May issue.

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NJC issue 02 out now

NJC OFC Feb 2015 - Dr AakeroyDr Christer Aakeröy (Kansas State University, USA) designed the outside cover this month. In their article, Dr Aakeroy and his colleagues describe how a simple electrostatic view of hydrogen bonds can lead to predictable and highly site-specific molecular recognition events.

The deceptively simple act of molecular recognition is achieved by balancing a range of non-covalent forces, and the synthesis of more complex architectures requires a systematic and targeted application of hierarchical self-assembly. By addressing specific questions about how small molecules prefer to bind to each other, it may be possible to devise reproducible and reliable links between molecular structure and practical methodologies for directed non-covalent synthesis.

Molecular electrostatic potential dependent selectivity of hydrogen bonding, Christer B. Aakeröy, Tharanga K. Wijethunga and John Desper, New J. Chem., 2015, 39, 822-828. DOI: 10.1039/C4NJ01324GNJC IFC Feb 2015 - Dr Gauthier

The inside cover is proposed by Dr Gilles Gauthier (Universidad Industrial de Santander, Colombia) and co-workers to illustrate their study on the influence of the Mn precursor on the formation of polytypes.

The authors studied in detail the phenomenon and also prepared a new polytype using a specific chemical route. The results show that even small changes in the mean oxidation state of the transition metals can guide a synthesis route in different ways and lead to different polytypes.

Their work contributes to the understanding of the solid state reactivity, giving new insights in the synthesis of new compounds,  destined for magnetic materials and other applications.

Influence of the synthesis route on the formation of 12R/10H-polytypes and their magnetic properties within the Ba(Ce,Mn)O3 family, Mario A. Macías, Olivier Mentré, Caroline Pirovano, Pascal Roussel, Silviu Colis and Gilles H. Gauthier, New J. Chem., 2015, 39, 829-835. DOI: 10.1039/C4NJ00798K

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This month’s issue also contains a Perspective review article on the structural development of simple molecular gelators from n-alkanes and the properties of the complex gels that they can form.

Systematic modifications of alkane-based molecular gelators and the consequences to the structures and properties of their gels, Michael A. Rogers and Richard G. Weiss, New J. Chem., 2015, 39, 785-79. DOI: 10.1039/C4NJ01439A

Also read the two Comments in which Professor Perrin and Professor Halevi debate the origin of secondary deuterium isotope effects.

Comment on “The role of electrostatic induction in secondary isotope effects on acidity” by E. A. Halevi, New J. Chem., 2014, 38, 3840, Charles L. Perrin, New J. Chem., 2015, 39, 1517-1521. DOI: 10.1039/C4NJ01887G

Reply to the ‘Comment on “The role of electrostatic induction in secondary isotope effects on acidity”’ by C. L. Perrin, New J. Chem., 2015, 39, DOI: 10.1039/C4NJ01887G, E. Amitai Halevi, New J. Chem., 2015, 39, 1522-1524. DOI: 10.1039/C4NJ02267J

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NJC issue 01 out now

NJC OFC Jan 2015 - Dr SaikiaThe first outside cover of the year was designed by Dr Lakshi Saikia (CSIR-North East Institute of Science and Technology, India) to illustrate a Letter in which the authors report a facile route for synthesizing Fe3O4 nanoparticles on MIL-101(Cr) support to obtain Fe3O4@MIL-101(Cr) nanocomposite and study its efficiency for the solvent-free oxidation of benzyl alcohol with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) as oxidant.
The results show that the catalyst can be easily recycled and could be reused for three times without significant loss in activity. This simple and rapid process can be extended to other metal organic frameworks that are chemically potent and thermally robust.

Facile synthesis of Fe3O4 nanoparticles on metal organic framework MIL-101(Cr): characterization and its catalytic activity.
Mrinal Saikia, Diganta Bhuyan and Lakshi Saikia.
New J. Chem., 2015, 39, 64-67. DOI: 10.1039/C4NJ01312C.

NJC IFC Jan 2015 - Dr SunDr Xiangcheng Sun (University of Waterloo, Canada) has designed the inside cover. In their Perspective review, Dr Sun and his colleagues expose their interest to develop rechargeable batteries for electric vehicles and large stationary power supplies. According to them, LTO anodes could replace the graphite anodes in current lithium-ion batteries because of their high safety, long life, low cost and environmentally benign properties.

In their work, the team introduces recent studies on electronic structure and performance, synthesis methods and strategies for further improvements, including carbon-coating, ion-doping, surface modification, nano-structuring and optimization of the particle morphology of the LTO anode. Furthermore, the authors highlight the practical applications of  commercial spinel LTO lithium-ion batteries and also deal with the future research directions and key developments of this spinel LTO anode.

Advances in spinel Li4Ti5O12 anode material for lithium-ion batteries.
Xiangcheng Sun, Pavle V. Radovanovic and Bo Cui.
New J. Chem., 2015, 39, 38-63. DOI: 10.1039/C4NJ01390E.

To read more, access the full January issue here.

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