Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Outstanding Reviewers for New Journal of Chemistry in 2016

Following the success of Peer Review Week in September 2016 (dedicated to reviewer recognition) during which we published a list of our top reviewers, we are delighted to announce that we will continue to recognise the contribution that our reviewers make to the journal by announcing our Outstanding Reviewers each year.

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for New Journal of Chemistry in 2016, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Dr Si-Xue Cheng, Wuhan University
Professor Antonio Frontera, Universitat de les Illes Balears
Professor Stephen Hashmi, Universität Heidelberg
Professor Jonathan Lindsey, North Carolina State University
Dr Adrian Ruff, Ruhr-Uni-Bochum
Professor Ben Zhong Tang, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Dr Giuseppe Trusso Sfrazzetto, University of Catania
Dr Qiongyou Wu, Central China Normal University
Dr Yi Xia, Chongqing University

We would also like to thank the New Journal of Chemistry board and the Inorganic community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Major society chemistry publishers jointly commit to integration with ORCID

ORCID provides an identifier for individuals to use with their name as they engage in research, scholarship and innovation activities, ensuring authors gain full credit for their work.

Today, we signed their open letter, along with ACS Publications, committing to unambiguous identification of all authors that publish in our journals.

The official press release can be read here.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

NJC issue 12 now online

NJC Dec 2016 OFC - Dr MagriThe last outside cover of the year 2016 is proposed by Dr David Magri (University of Malta). In their study, Dr Magri and his co-workers design and synthesize two novel ‘Pourbaix sensors’ based on a naphthalimide fluorophore according to a ‘fluorophore–spacer1–receptor–spacer2–electron-donor’ design. Their results contribute to the emerging number of intelligent molecular and supramolecular devices responsive to oxidants and pH. The authors are currently exploring the use of naphthalimide-based ‘Pourbaix sensors’ for molecular biosensing and environmental diagnostic applications.

Water-soluble naphthalimide-based ‘Pourbaix sensors’: pH and redox-activated fluorescent AND logic gates based on photoinduced electron transfer
Alex D. Johnson, Kyle A. Paterson, Jake C. Spiteri, Sergey A. Denisov, Gediminas Jonusauskas, Arnaud Tron, Nathan D. McClenaghan and David C. Magri*.
New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 9917-9922. DOI: 10.1039/C6NJ02023B.

You can access the entire table of contents of the December issue of NJC here.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

NJC issue 11 now online

NJC Nov 16 OFC - Dr ChandraDr Sudeshna Chandra (NMIMS University, India) designed this month’s outside cover. It illustrates an article in which the authors propose a novel electrochemical immunosensor, based on a redox-active ferrocenyl dendrimer on a glassy carbon electrode, for the detection of cancer biomarkers.

Fabrication of a label-free electrochemical immunosensor using a redox active ferrocenyl dendrimer
Sudeshna Chandra, Christian Gäbler, Christian Schliebe, Heinrich Lang and Dhirendra Bahadur,  New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 9046-9053. DOI: 10.1039/C6NJ00830E.

NJC Nov 16 IFC - Dr Jelinek

The inside cover is proposed by Dr Raz Jelinek (Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel). According to Dr Jelinek and his co-workers, the analysis of artworks and identification of their molecular components is very important to choose proper conservation strategies and monitor their restoration. In their study the authors present an application of spin-coated polydiacetylene films for in situ colorimetric sensing of a selection of organic materials present in paintings. Their study shows that the polydiacetylene technology might open new analytical avenues in molecular analysis, in general, and more specifically for painting restoration and conversation science.

Colorimetric analysis of painting materials using polymer-supported polydiacetylene films
Alexander Trachtenberg, Orit Malka, Kaviya Parambath Kootery, Stella Beglaryan, Danilo Malferrari, Paola Galletti, Silvia Prati, Rocco Mazzeo, Emilio Tagliavini and  Raz Jelinek, New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 9054-9059. DOI: 10.1039/C6NJ02092E.

NJC FOC Nov 16 - Dr Labarca

Also read the short Focus review by Dr Martín Labarca (Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina). Dr Labarca addresses the problem of the status of the element of atomic number zero or “neutronium”. According to him, it is more cautious from both a scientific and a philosophical standpoint, to think of the neutron just as a structural component of an element.

An element of atomic number zero?
Martín Labarca, New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 9002-9006. DOI: 10.1039/C6NJ02076C.

Browse the full table of contents of the November issue to discover the other studies conducted by our authors here.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

NJC issue 10 now online

NJC Oct 2016 OFC - Prof. HanusaThe October outside cover is proposed by Prof. Timothy P. Hanusa (Vanderbilt University, USA). In this article, the authors report a series of heavy alkaline-earth iodide coordination compounds containing various neutral donor ligands: phosphine oxides, ureas and the nitrobenzene dimer. These donors were chosen for their range of basicity and steric demand, to determine how well they could compete with the iodide ligand. The observed reactivity patterns suggest that ureas deserve more widespread use in group 2 chemistry, as they have a basicity that exceeds that of phosphine oxides, are available with a variety of substituents, and are inexpensive.

Selective modification of the metal coordination environment in heavy alkaline-earth iodide complexes
Lacey S. Fitts, Eric J. Bierschenk, Timothy P. Hanusa,* Arnold L. Rheingold, Maren Pink and Victor G. Young, Jr. New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 8229-8238. DOI: 10.1039/C6NJ01713D.

Do not hesitate to browse the entire table of contents of the October issue to discover the 9 Letters and 86 Articles. Click here!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

NJC issue 09 now online

NJC OFC Sept 2016 - Dr GuoThis month, the outside cover is proposed by Dr Jinbao Guo (Beijing University of Chemical Technology, China). In their work, the authors develop a facile bilayered structural device composed of a silver nanoparticle array with a liquid crystal elastomer. The device is elastic and changes color by sensing deformations induced by changing temperature, attributed to alignment of the liquid crystal molecules induced by the nanoparticle array. This actuator design could be a promising candidate for smart environmental-responsive devices such as thermal-camouflage skin and color-changing actuators.

A color-changing plasmonic actuator based on silver nanoparticle array/liquid crystalline elastomer nanocomposites
Yang Shi, Chao Zhu, Juntao Li, Jie Wei and Jinbao Guo, New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 7311-7319. DOI: 10.1039/C6NJ00492J.

NJC OFC Sept 2016 - Dr Mazej

Miss Maruša Mazej designed the inside cover to illustrate a study by Dr Zoran Mazej and his colleague Dr Goreshnik (Jožef Stefan Institute, Slovenia). Based on a short communication published in 1976 presenting three compounds described as XeF6·TiF4, 4XeF6·TiF4 and XeF6·2TiF4, and on the synthesis of [XeF5]3[Ti4F19] (i.e. 3XeF6·4TiF4) published in 2009, the authors reveal in this study the crystal structures of these 3 compounds, which can be formulated as XeF5TiF5, [XeF5]5[Ti10F45] and [XeF5][Ti3F13]. [XeF5]5[Ti10F45] contains the largest known discrete decameric [Ti10F45]5− anion built from ten TiF6 octahedra that share vertices and that are arranged in a double-star shape.

Largest perfluorometallate [Ti10F45]5− oligomer and polymeric ([Ti3F13]) and ([TiF5]) anions prepared as [XeF5]+ salts
Zoran Mazej and Evgeny A. Goreshnika, New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 7320-7325. DOI: 10.1039/C6NJ00955G.

Discover the full contents of the September issue here.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

NJC Poster Prize Winners at Metals and Genetics Meeting

Three young scientists were recognized for their contributions at the 6th International Conference on Metals and Genetics, which took place earlier this year at the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore.

The winners (in no particular order) of the NJC Poster Prizes awarded at this conference were:

Mr Vadde Ramu, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune
Poster title: New imaging reagents for lipid dense regions in live cells and the nucleus in fixed MCF-7 cells

The presented work is part of Vadde’s Ph.D. thesis, carried out under the supervision of Dr. Amitava Das. Vadde will be defending his thesis work this month and is moving to Jena for a post-doctoral position in October.

The presented research work demonstrated the design and synthesis of two new uracil (U) and 5-flurouracil (5-FU) labelled ruthenium(II)-polypyridyl based cellular imaging reagents. These two complexes were found to show affinity towards DNA in the nucleus of the PFA fixed cells. A large Stokes shift (λ = 160 nm) and an appreciably long-lived 3MLCT excited state (λ = 320 ns) in aq. buffer medium (pH 7.4) are other key features of these complexes. Unlike the common nuclear DNA staining reagents like DAPI, these low-cytotoxic reagents are found to be highly stable towards photo-bleaching upon irradiation with λ > 455 nm at the MLCT band for these complexes.

Mr Samsuzzoha Mondal, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai
Poster title: Sensing Signalling Phospholipids with ‘Lanthano-proteins’

Samsuzzoha is a Ph.D. student working in the group of Dr. Ankona Datta. He is in his final year and expects to defend his degree in mid-2017.

His present research is about developing fluorescent probes for imaging the crucial phospholipids involved in cell signaling processes. Currently available genetically encoded fluorescent probes lack ‘on-off’ sensing and have problems with background signal. Hence tracking the spatio-temporal dynamics of phospholipids in a live cellular process with those fluorescent proteins is challenging. The authors are addressing this issue by developing novel fluorescent probes with ‘turn on’ or ‘ratiometric’ fluorescence sensing. The poster presents a ‘lanthano’-protein based ‘turn on’ sensor for phosphatidylserine, a phospholipid involved in cell-death signals mediation and several other signaling processes. Additionally, a recently developed, cell permeable, ratiometric sensor for phosphoinositides, the most important signaling phospholipids in the cellular system, is demonstrated.


Ms Tandrila Das, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore
Poster title: Vacancy-Engineered Nanoceria: Enzyme Mimetic Hotspots for the degradation of Nerve Agents

Tandrila did the work presented in the poster as a 5th year BS-MS student under the direction of Prof. Govindasamy Mugesh. She is now a 1st year student in the Tri-Institutional Ph.D. program in chemical biology offered by Weill Cornell Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and The Rockefeller University (all located in New York City).

The study of phosphotriesterase (PTE) enzymes and synthesis of its structural and functional mimics has been a long time interest of the lab. PTE enzymes degrade organophosphorus nerve agents, which are known to inhibit acetylcholine esterase, thus resulting in paralysis, respiratory failure, etc.  For her Master’s thesis, Tandrila worked on developing a nano-mimic of PTE enzyme. The poster work showed that vacancy engineered nanoceria (CeO2) with Ce in both +3 and +4 oxidation states very efficiently act as a catalyst to hydrolyze organophosphorus nerve agents like paraoxon, parathion, etc.

(The photo shows Tandrila on the left with co-author Dr Amit Vernekar, currently a post-doc in the Lippard group at MIT.)

Congratulations to the 3 laureates, and best wishes for continuing success in their research and careers.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

NJC issue 08 now online

NJC August 2016 OFC - L. SmolkoLukáš Smolko in the group of Prof. Juraj Černák (P. J Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia) designed this month’s outside cover. In their article, the five authors report on a novel series of tetracoordinate Co(II) complexes— [Co(bcp)X2] (bcp = bathocuproine; X = Cl, Br, I)—which all possess moderate magnetic anisotropy. They show that although the structures of the complexes are very similar, slight differences in the crystal packing lead to significantly different magnetic behaviour.

Tetracoordinate Co(II) complexes containing bathocuproine and single molecule magnetism
Lukáš Smolko, Juraj Černák*, Michal Dušek, Ján Titišc and Roman Bočac.
New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 6593-6598. DOI: 10.1039/C6NJ00372A.

NJC August 2016 IFC - L. Henderson

The inside cover is proposed by Dr Luke Henderson (Deakin University, Australia) to illustrate a study in which the authors examine the toxicity of a new class of ionic liquids. These are equimolar solutions of lithium bistrifluoromethylsulfonimide in triglyme (G3TFSA) or tetraglyme (G4TFSA), with potential applications in a variety of areas such as energy storage in lithium batteries and as  alternatives to traditional organic solvents. The authors demonstrate the lack of toxicity of these two solvate ionic liquids by three different complementary methods and conclude that G3TFSA and G4TFSA can be used as a replacement for DMSO for experimental research both in vitro and in vivo.

A study on acute toxicity and solvent capacity of solvate ionic liquids in vivo using a zebrafish model (Danio rerio)
Prusothman Yoganantharajah, Daniel J. Eyckens, Jessie L. Pedrina, Luke C. Henderson* and Yann Gibert.
New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 6599-6603. DOI: 10.1039/C6NJ00291A.

To browse the entire table of contents of the August issue of NJC, click here.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

NJC issue 07 now online

NJC July 2016 OFC NLigands - Dr Monchaud

This month’s issue includes a themed collection put together by guest editors Claude Gros and Franck Denat (Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, France). It reports recent advances in the chemistry of Nitrogen Ligands, including organic, coordination, metal-organic and bioinorganic chemistry, and also materials science and catalysis. This themed issue follows the 6th EuCheMS Conference on Nitrogen Ligands held in Beaune in September 2015. The Editors and the NJC team are very grateful to all the authors (representing 13 countries) and reviewers of the 39 contributions to this themed issue.

Access the Editorial here.

We would like to thank Dr David Monchaud (Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, France) for designing the outside cover. It illustrates an article reporting a palladated porphyrin named Pd·TEGPy. The authors show that its efficiency as a quadruplex-selective fluorescent dye relies on a structural design that endows it with attractive supramolecular and electronic properties and makes it an efficient turn-on, fluorescent stain thanks to a DNA-mediated sensitization mechanism that ensures a high level of specificity.

DNA structure-specific sensitization of a metalloporphyrin leads to an efficient in vitro quadruplex detection molecular tool
Pape Diaba Diabate, Aurélien Laguerre, Marc Pirrotta, Nicolas Desbois, Julien Boudon, Claude P. Gros and David Monchaud, New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 5683-5689. DOI: 10.1039/C6NJ01012A.

NJC IFC July 2016 - Dr HR Zhang

The inside cover is proposed by Dr Hai-Rong Zhang (Guangxi Normal University, China) to illustrate a paper showing the authors’ interest in finding novel non-platinum metal-based complexes with maximal beneficial antitumor properties and minimal side effects. In their study, Dr Zhang and his colleagues synthesize and structurally characterize two rhodium(III) complexes of 8-hydroxyquinoline (HOQ) and its derivative 5-bromo-8-hydroxyquinoline (HBrQ). They also screen the in vitro cytotoxicity against a series of human cancer cell lines and study the DNA binding properties of the best cytotoxic complex.

Studies on the structures, cytotoxicity and apoptosis mechanism of 8-hydroxylquinoline rhodium(III) complexes in T-24 cells
Hai-Rong Zhang, Yan-Cheng Liu, Zhen-Feng Chen, Ting Meng, Bi-Qun Zou, You-Nian Liu and Hong Liang, New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 6005-6014. DOI: 10.1039/C6NJ00182C.

We invite you to browse the complete table of contents of the July issue to discover other reports that are not part of the themed collection.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

NJC issue 06 now online

NJC June 2016 OFC - Prof. MizunoProf. Noritaka Mizuno (The University of Tokyo, Japan) designed this month’s outside cover. It illustrates an NJC Letter in which Prof. Mizuno and his colleagues present for the first time the efficient catalytic desulfurization-oxygenation of secondary and tertiary thioamides into amides using O2 as the terminal oxidant and water as the oxygen source. Their results show that various kinds of structurally diverse thioamides could be applied to this catalytic system. They use phosphovanadomolybdic acids, possessing both acidic and oxidation properties, the key to realizing this transformation as the efficient catalytic one.

Phosphovanadomolybdic acid catalyzed desulfurization–oxygenation of secondary and tertiary thioamides into amides using molecular oxygen as the terminal oxidant, Ning Xu, Xiongjie Jin, Kosuke Suzuki, Kazuya Yamaguchi and Noritaka Mizuno, New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 4865-4869. DOI: 10.1039/C5NJ03579A.

_____________________

This month’s issue also features a Perspective review by Dr Radovan Šebesta (Comenius University in Bratislava, Slovakia) and his two co-workers, which focuses on a methodology affording diversely substituted chiral carbonyl compounds. Enamines, formed from the corresponding carbonyl compounds and appropriate chiral amine catalysts, can be oxidized to radical cation species. These radical cations can be intercepted by a range of SOMO-philic reagents, such as alkenes, arenes and some heteroatom-based reagents. They show that asymmetric singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) catalysis is a useful tool for enantioselective allylic alkylation, enolation, arylation, carbo-oxidation, vinylation, alkynylation, or intermolecular alkylation of carbonyl compounds, predominantly aldehydes. This new bond-forming methodology can find application in the construction of both natural products as well as medicinal agents.

GA - NJC 10.1039/C6NJ00079G

Enantioselective organocatalysis using SOMO activation, Mária Mečiarová, Pavol Tisovský and Radovan Šebesta, New J. Chem., 2016, 40, 4855-4864. DOI: 10.1039/C6NJ00079G.

To browse the entire table of contents of the June issue, click here. And to sign up for the free e-alerts, so as not to miss a single issue of NJC, click here.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)