Archive for the ‘Conference’ Category

Update for the NJC Symposia in Sweden

Last announcement! The 3rd series of NJC Symposia: New Directions in Chemistry will take place in May 2014. These symposia are being organised with the collaboration of KTH in Stockholm and Lund University. The NJC Board and editors are being hosted by Profs Mikael Lindström and Christina Moberg at KTH and Prof. Ola Wendt in Lund. We warmly thank the hosts and their institutions for their support in making these events possible.

Schedule
May 21st: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science & Engineering, Lecture Hall K1, from 9 am to 5 pm
May 23rd: Lund University, Kemicentrum, Lecture Hall B, from 9 am to 5:30 pm

We hope to meet many colleagues from Sweden but also Denmark, Norway and Finland during these 2 days.

If you wish to attend, please contact either Christina Moberg (kino ‘at’ kth.se) for the Stockholm date or Ola Wendt (Ola.Wendt ‘at’ chem.lu.se) for the Lund date to register your interest.

Full details are on the flyers and programs below (click on an image to see a larger image).

NJC Symposium at KTH on May 21, 2014NJC Symposium at KTH on May 21, 2014
NJC Symposium at Lund University on May 23, 2014NJC Symposium at Lund University on May 23, 2014

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Announcing the 2014 NJC Symposia in Sweden

2014 NJC Symposia: New Directions in Chemistry

Following on 2012’s NJC Symposia in 3 Chinese cities, NJC editorial board members and editors will be travelling to Sweden for two 2014 NJC Symposia: New Directions in Chemistry. Each one-day symposium will feature presentations by NJC editorial board members and invited guest speakers.


Please join us and meet... 
Members of the NJC Editorial Board who will be participating in the 2014 NJC Symposia are:
Co-Editor-in-Chief Professor Mir Wais HOSSEINI (University of Strasbourg, France)
Associate Editor Professor Jaïrton DUPONT (Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil)
Associate Editor Professor Peter JUNK (James Cook University, Australia)
Professor Len BARBOUR (University of Stellenbosch, South Africa)
Professor Debbie CRANS (Colorado State University, USA)
Professor Odile EISENSTEIN (CNRS, Montpellier, France)
Professor Christina MOBERG (KTH, Stockholm, Sweden)
Professor Sijbren OTTO (University of Groningen, The Netherlands)
Professor Dai-Wen PANG (Wuhan University, China)
NJC Managing Editor Dr Denise PARENT (CNRS, Montpellier, France) will also be present.

Dates:
May 21 at the KTH in Stockholm (Host: Professor Christina MOBERG)
May 23 at Lund University (Host: Professor Ola WENDT)
Full details and the scientific programs will be available soon. Please check this blog in the coming weeks.
These symposia are free and open to all interested persons.
We all look forward to meeting you in Stockholm or Lund in May!
Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Peer Review and Editorial Responsibility

Last month I attended the joint meeting of two societies for scientific editors (EASE and ISTME) that took place in the seaside resort town of Blankenberge in Belgium. Two days filled with presentations, discussions and networking attracted about 85 participants from around the world. Most were scientific editors who occupy a variety of positions in the public or private sector or work as freelance editors. But there were also consultants in the publishing field, translators, and an internet content expert.

I was particularly inspired by the presentation of Dr Irene Hames (member of COPE, the Committee on Publication Ethics) who was the opening keynote lecturer. Dr Hames spoke on peer review: what is it? what problems does it face? how to improve it? what does the future hold?

Here I will focus on just one aspect of her presentation, adding some of my own views (the full presentation can be viewed here).

Quality peer review, highly valued by authors, depends on reviewers and editors working together. The time and effort furnished by voluntary reviewers are indispensible for the good functioning of the peer review system. Editors expect reviewers to be able to judge the quality of a manuscript, and ideally to give an opinion on the suitability of the work for the particular journal that has sent it out for review. But this is a lot to ask for! It is indeed difficult for any reviewer to master in detail the editorial policies of all journals that they review for so as to determine what is a suitable manuscript for a given journal.

An editor who knows his or her journal well is the best placed to judge what is suitable for publication in the journal. An editor who simply counts “votes” is abdicating their responsibility towards their journal. Editors need to read the manuscript, fashion their own opinion, then analyse the reports they receive to make a decision that takes into consideration their journal’s scope and editorial policy. Reviewers give advice and recommendations, but the final decision rests with the editor, who needs to fully shoulder that responsibility.

The dedication of scientific reviewers allows the peer review system to function. The skill, insight and judgement of the editor are essential factors in making it function well. Peer review does not absolve an editor from taking responsibility for the editorial decisions that she or he makes.

NJC‘s editors all strive to offer fair and impartial peer review of high quality to our authors, while respecting the work of the voluntary peer reviewers.

“Reviewers advise, editors decide.”

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Profiles of the 18th ESOC Bursary Awardees

NJC, committed to supporting the younger members of the chemistry community, underwrote student bursaries at this summer’s 18th European Symposium on Organic Chemistry, held in Marseille this past July. The 8 young awardees, from 8 European countries, are briefly profiled here.

Szilvia Deak is a second year Ph.D. student in the research group of Prof. Ferenc Faigl at Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Department of Organic Chemistry and Technology (Hungary). The group develops novel regio- and stereoselective metallation processes for the synthesis of atropisomeric functionalised biaryls (1-phenylpyrrole derivatives) and optically active heterocyclic compounds (oxiranes, oxetanes, pyrrolidines) as potential chiral ligands and organocatalysts.
Szilvia’s poster was entitled “Atropisomeric amino alcohols as new chiral ligands in asymmetric synthesis”.

Paulina Hamankiewicz is currently finishing her Ph.D. thesis on molecular and chiral recognition of organic compounds using carbohydrate derivatives, decorated with urea moieties. She will be graduating from the University of Warsaw (Poland), where she is in the group of Prof. Janusz Jurczak (Laboratory of Stereocontrolled Organic Synthesis).
Paulina’s poster: “Benzene, naphthalene, and anthracene urea derivatives as convenient tools for chiral recognition”.

Maria Riala is from the Department of Chemistry of the University of Cyprus in Nicosia (Cyprus). After her undergraduate degree she completed her Ph.D. studies in the Research Laboratory of Fullerene and Supramolecular Chemistry under the supervision of Asst. Prof. Nikos Chronakis and graduated in June 2013. Maria’s research is focused on the synthesis of bis- and trisadducts of C60 with an inherently chiral addition pattern utilizing enantiomerically pure tethers.
Maria’s poster: “Synthesis of chiral Th-symmetrical hexakis adducts of C60.

Ekrem Kaplan is a Masters chemistry student at Istanbul Technical University (Turkey). Under the supervisor of Prof. Esin Hamuryudan, Ekrem is preparing peripheral and non-peripheral substituted manganese(III) phthalocyanine bearing carboxylic side groups and investigating their electrochemical properties.
Ekrem’s poster: “Synthesis and Electrochemical Studies of Carboxylic Acid Functionalized Phthalocyanines”.

Tatiana Dias is a Ph.D. student in the Chemistry Research Centre at the University of Minho (Portugal) in the group of Prof. Fernanda Proença. The research group’s work is focused on the synthesis of new drug candidates, mainly nitrogen and oxygen-containing heterocyclic structures. Tatiana’s research has been centred on the development of new synthetic methodologies to prepare chromene derivatives to be tested as anticancer agents.
Tatiana’s poster at ESOC was “2-Hydroxychalcones and carbon acid derivatives: Reactivity studies in acid media”.

Kostas Voreakos is writing up his Master’s dissertation, after completing his research in the group of Dr. Dimitris Georgiadis of the Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry in the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (Greece). The research group focuses on the design and synthesis of metallopeptidase inhibitors and the development of synthetic methodologies for medicinal applications. Previously, Kostas earned first degrees in both chemistry and food technology.
Kostas’s poster at ESOC was entitled “Conformationally Constrained Phosphinic Peptides: Synthesis of α,β-Disubstituted Phosphinyl Propanoates and Development of δ-lactam Phosphinic Surrogates”.
Phosphinic Peptides
Agnese Stikute is a 4th year undergraduate student in Chemical Engineering at the Faculty of Material Science and Applied Chemistry of Riga Technical University (Latvia). She works in the Institute of Technology of Organic Chemistry/Department of Chemical Technology of Biologically Active Compounds under the supervision of Prof. Mara Jure. Agnese’s research is devoted to the synthesis of analogues of natural antioxidants, focused on the discovery and optimization of the synthesis of cinnamoyl anilines and their derivatives.
Agnese’s poster: “Cyclization of monoanilides of arylidene malonic acid”.

Kärt Reitel is a Ph.D. student in Tallinn University of Technology (Estonia). She works in the organic synthesis group under the supervision of Prof. Tõnis Kanger. Kärt’s main research topic is the synthesis of cyclopropane-containing compounds and their application in organocatalytic reactions.
Kärt’s ESOC poster was entitled “Aminocatalytic Michael addition of cyclopropane-containing aldehydes to nitroolefins”.

Congratulations to all the awardees! (Check out “who is who” in the photo montage below.)

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Highlights of the 8th International Dendrimer Symposium

The 8th International Dendrimer Symposium was successfully held in Madrid on June 23–27 with Prof. Maria Angeles Muñoz-Fernandez as the chair. More than 200 scientists from all over the world participated in IDS-8 to present their latest achievements in dendrimer science.

The meeting opened with the “Ramon Areces” welcome lecture delivered by Prof. Virgil Percec, who depicted a fascinating material genome approach to construct complex dendrimer systems. Using dendritic motifs to create different types of fractal patterns was nicely exemplified by Prof. George Newkome, whereas capitalization on new strategies for dendrimer synthesis was the main focus in the lecture of Prof. René Roy. Prof. Dieter Schlüter reported the synthesis and characterization as well as discontinuities in dendronized polymers, whereas Dr. Anil Patri presented lessons learned from preclinical assessment of dendrimers.

Prof. Donald Tomalia gave a vivid and brief overview on the development of dendrimer science and focused in particular on the dendritic effects, which were further discussed in the lectures of Dr. Anne-Marie Caminade and Dr. Takuzo Aida. The meeting ended with the closing lecture of Dr. Jean-Pierre Majoral, who discussed the dendrimer space in nanomedicine and foresaw a bright future for dendrimers in therapeutic applications.

Poster prizes provided by several sponsors, including NJC, were awarded just before this closing lecture. The NJC laureats were profiled in an earlier post.

It is to note that, beside the excellent scientific program, there was a fantastic social program with a visit of the Prado museum and the Real Madrid stadium as well as the flamenco gala evening.

The next IDS meeting will be hosted by René Roy in Montreal, Canada in 2015. NJC will be there and we look forward to another excellent conference in the fascinating field of dendrimers.

Snapshots from the conference (courtesy of the organizers), including at far left the opening lecture by Virgil Percec (photo courtesy of Don Tomalia).

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Three young chemists honoured at the 8th International Dendrimer Symposium

New Journal of Chemistry sponsored 3 poster prizes at the 8th International Dendrimer Symposium that took place this summer in Madrid, continuing its support of this series of symposia and the dendrimer community in general.

Guang Zhang is a 2nd year Ph.D. student in the group of Klaus Müllen at the MPI for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany. He is conducting research on polyphenylene dendrimers and their applications for fluorescent blue light emitting diodes. Zhang’s poster reported G1 and G2 dendrimers having triphenylamine on the surface and pyrene in the core, which showed promising properties as blue OLED materials. Guang’s reaction to winning the NJC Poster Prize: “It is a great honor for me to receive the prize. It’s also a big surprise that I can have access to NJC for free for one year.”

Surface Functionalized Polyphenylene Dendrimers for Deep Blue Light  Emitting Diodes
G. Zhang, M. Baumgarten, R. Trattnig, M. Auer, E. J. W. List, K. Müllen

The winner from Spain is Javier Sánchez, who currently is a postdoctoral fellow at the Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, where he also carried out his Ph.D. research in the group of María Ángeles Muñoz Fernández.  The focus of Javier’s research is anti-HIV activity, but always with an eye to the potential clinical applications. He explains: “I always try to elucidate the mechanisms by which the different dendrimers behave as they do on the HIV-1 cycle.” The research presented at the conference looked at the anti-HIV activity of different carbosilane dendrimers. After development of the dendrimers they were tested using toxicity assays, inflammatory cytokines induction, HIV infection and cell phenotyping by flow cytommetry. This has led to a dendrimer that as a microbicide has anti-HIV activity for different HIV viral strains.

Anti-HIV Activity of Thiol-Ene Carbosilane Dendrimers and Potential Topical Microbicide
J. Sánchez-Rodríguez, L. Díaz, M. Galán, M. Maly, R. Gómez, F. J. de la Mata, J. L. Jiménez, M. A. Muñoz- Fernández

The 3rd winner is from the group of Eric Simanek at Texas Christian University in the USA. Changsuk Lee is now a postdoctoral fellow, after having obtained his Ph.D. under the direction of Daniel Romo at Texas A&M University in 2010. Changsuk works towards the development of drug delivery vehicles by using various sizes and shapes of dendrimers; to date triazine dendrimers are the best delivery vehicles among others tested. The winning poster covered the synthesis of a prodrug platform with paclitaxel, its biodistribution, mice efficacy testing, and molecular dynamic simulations.

Synthesis and Biological Assessment of a Triazine Dendrimer with 16 Paclitaxel Groups
C. Lee, S.-T. Lo, J. Lim, V. C. P. da Costa, S. Ramezani, G. M. Pavan, O. Annuziata, X. Sun, E. E. Simanek

Congratulations to all 3 winners, who received a certificate, RSC book and a one-year NJC subscription.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Meet NJC team at summer conference season 2013

Summer Conferences are something we can’t afford to miss! The NJC editors will be attending a number of conferences in the coming weeks. We look forward to meeting you!

NJC is proud to support the following conferences:

Denise will represent NJC at the 20th EuCheMS conference on Organometallic Chemistry (EuCOMC), St Andrews, Scotland, 30 June-4 July 2013. NJC is the sponsor of the Young Plenary Lecturer Dr Florence Mongin from the University of Rennes.
18th European Symposium on Organic Chemistry (ESOC 2013) will be held in Marseille, on the Mediterranean coast of France, at the beginning of July (7th to 12th).   The Palais du Pharo Vieux Port will welcome about 900 participants, including NJC Assistant Editor Ling Peng.
NJC Editor-in-chief Wais Hosseini will be at the International Conference on Advanced Complex Inorganic Nanomaterials, to be held in Namur, Belgium (15–19 July).
NJC is delighted to sponsor the Tuesday evening Poster Session at the 16th International Conference on Bio-Inorganic Chemistry (ICBIC), which will take place in Grenoble from 22–26 July 2013.
The exciting chemistry conference for the Asian community, the 15th Asian Chemical Congress (15 ACC), is returning to its birthplace – Singapore – from 19–23 August. NJC Associate Editor Peter Junk will be there.
We are delighted to be partner of the Groupe d’Etude de Chimie Organique (GECO), which will meet for the 54th time this year. This conference, organized by Erwan Le Grognec, will take place in Croisic (France) at the end of August from the 25th to 30th.

If you are planning on attending any of these conferences please don’t hesitate to email the editorial office to arrange a meeting!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

NJC Poster Prizes for Synthetic Organic Chemistry

Synthetic organic chemistry is the common theme of the research projects that were awarded NJC poster prizes at 3 regional meetings held this past spring.

Irene accepts her NJC poster prize presented by Prof. Elisabet Dunach.

Ms Justine Giauffret & Dr Irene Notar-Francesco (in the group of Sylvain Antoniotti at the Institute of Chemistry in Nice) shared the first prize for their work on the tandem cyclosimerisation and thioacylation of 1,6-enynes catalysed by supported noble metal nanoparticles. This poster was presented at the PACA region (southeastern France) meeting of the French Chemical Society (SCF) in April.

The unexpected product obtained by Justine and Irene.

 

Nathalie, winner of the NJC poster Prize.

A month later, on the other side of France in Brittany, Ms Nathalie Camus was awarded the NJC poster prize at the northwestern France regional meeting of the SCF. Nathalie is a doctoral student in the group of Raphael Tripier at the Université de Bretagne Occidentale; her poster presented the C-functionalisation of cyclams to make bifunctional chelating ligands for use in nuclear medicine.

Design of the bifunctional chelating cyclam.

 

Prof. Erick Carreira presents Alexandre with his NJC poster prize.

Moving back to the southeast to Grenoble, Mr Alexandre Cannillo was the NJC poster prize winner at the 3rd Francophone Symposium on Total Synthesis. His award-winning work used domino Petasis Diels-Alder reactions to synthesise enantiopure polycyclic compounds. Alexandre is a graduate student at the Institute on the Chemistry of Natural Substances in Gif-sur-Yvette, working under the direction of Jean-Marie Beau and Stéphanie Norsikian.

Polycyclic compounds synthesised from readily available starting materials by domino reactions.

 

Congratulations to all of our winners! We wish them continuing success with their research projects and a bright future in chemistry.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

NJC at the 96th Canadian Chemistry Conference in Quebec City

Clockwise from upper left: Place Royale, St Louis gate, Chateau Frontignac, old city signs, statue of S Champlain, St Louis street. (Photos by D Parent.)

After the wilderness of Georgian Bay, I was off to discover the old world charm of Quebec City, host of the 96th Canadian Chemistry Conference.

NJC sponsored two of the symposia included in the programming:
— “Novel Aromatic Compounds: Molecular Materials and Devices” organised by Graham Bodwell and Yuming Zhao (both at Memorial University of Newfoundland)
— “Recent Developments in Pincer Chemistry and Multidentate Ligands” organised by Davit Zargarian (University of Montreal), Hairong Guan (University of Cincinnati ) and Dmitiri Gousev (Wilfrid Laurier University )

For inorganic chemists the “place to be” at CCC was the pincer ligands symposium during the 3 days that it was held. It was SRO (“standing room only”) at times, as people came to hear some of the top experts speak, people like Gerard van Koten, Bob Crabtree, Mike Fryzuk, Alan Goldman, Dan Mindiola and Oleg Ozerov, who were the plenary lecturers

The novel aromatic compounds symposium had the feeling of a family reunion—convivial with a faithful crowd in attendance. The topics ranged from synthesis to properties to applications with plenary speakers Remi Chauvin, Ben King, Rik Tykwinski, Thomas Baumgartner, Alex Adronov, Will Skene and Dmitri Perepichka.

Novel Aromatic Compounds speakers' dinner with NJC editor Denise Parent and CCC Scientific Chair Thierry Ollevier.

At the end of each symposium, NJC hosted the speakers’ dinner with the organisers. Chic French cuisine was served up for the organic group, while the inorganic chemists were treated to hearty Quebecois cooking. It looks like everyone had a good time, enjoying the food and the company.

Next year’s meeting will be held in Vancouver from June 1–5. I for one certainly look forward to attending.

Photos from the Pincer Ligands speakers' dinner hosted by NJC. (Photos courtesy of G Wilson.)

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Georgian Bay Day at Killbear Park

After 3 full days, Martin Stillman offered participants in CanBIC-4 a day of R&R in Killbear Provincial Park. Boarding a big yellow school bus (it’s been over 40 years since I last rode one in high school!) we were taken to the park, where we split into 2 groups. I’d opted for the “kayak in the afternoon” group (we’ll see later how that worked out) so my group started the morning with a talk on snakes.

An Eastern Foxsnake found in Ontario

Jimmy, a domesticated Eastern Foxsnake

The star of this “show-and-tell” presentation was undoubtedly Jimmy, an Eastern Foxsnake, which is an endangered species. Jimmy was illegally taken from his natural home to live in an apartment, during which time he became thoroughly domesticated. Jimmy has now lived in the park’s visitor centre for 11 years and he loves to be handled by visitors.

 

Jimmy, an Eastern Foxsnake

Jimmy enjoying a snuggle!

View along Georgian Bay at Killbear park.

Our group then headed out for a walk along the Georgian Bay shore to learn all about lichens. Our guide Jessica had done extensive research to prepare for our learned group. While Jessica pointed out various species of lichens, she told us many interesting facts about them: the symbiotic relationship (or not?) between a fungus and a photosynthetic parter (green algae or cyanobacterium); their classification and distribution; modes of reproduction; their chemistry and finally applications, such as dyes.

For me the most provocative fact was that 3 species of lichens are able to degrade the toxic form of prions, which normally are very resistant to degradation. Yes, lichens have prions, though since they have no central nervous system they are not subject to the diseases that prions can cause. So why would some specific lichens be able to degrade toxic prions?

Some leafy lichens

 

Very bright green lichens!

 

Strange black lichens

Kayaking on Georgian Bay

The morning group kayaking on Georgian Bay.

After a picnic on the beach, it was my group’s turn to go out kayaking on the bay, in tandem boats (excuse me, kayaks!). After a quick tutorial on how to put on the “skirt” that seals you into the kayak (our first challenge), how to paddle, and the responsibilities of each team member (brawn in the front, brains in the back—of course I was in the back for lack of the former), we set off for some exercise.

And exercise it was! Many of us had opted to kayak in the afternoon, thinking it would be warmer and indeed it was. However, the wind had come up in the early afternoon, leading to choppy water and a much harder row for those of us out there. We didn’t make it as far as the morning group, and on our way back, against the wind, the shore seemed to remain out of reach, until we finally arrived. And that is when it happened—trying to get out of the kayak I didn’t coordinate very well with my partner and ended up “sitting down” in the water. Yikes!

Finally, some relaxation: time for a BBQ and convivial talk to end the day, before returning to Parry Sound.

If there’s one word that characterises Martin, it has to be energy—boundless energy—and one needs plenty of it to keep up with him, even in fun!

A view of Georgian Bay at Killbear Park Myself on the rocky shore of Georgian Bay Killbear Park shore

All photos copyright Denise Parent

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)