Author Archive

Hot article: N-doped titanium dioxide for Li-ion batteries

In their NJC paper, George Hasegawa and co-workers (Kyoto University, Japan) demonstrate facile synthesis of hierarchically porous N-doped TiO2 and applications to the anode of Li-ion batteries.

The precursor titanium-based hybrid gels were prepared by crosslinking titanium alkoxide with ethylenediamine in a non-hydrolytic sol-gel route which leads to TiO2 homogeneously doped with a high amount of nitrogen. The combination of N-doping into TiO2 and hierarchically porous structure effectively improves electrode performance; the resultant N-doped anatase showed good discharge capacities higher than the capacity of conventional anatase electrodes.

Synthesis and Electrochemical Performance of Hierarchically Porous N-doped TiO2 for Li-ion Batteries
George Hasegawa, Tatsuya Sato, Kazuyoshi Kanamori, Kazuki Nakanishi and Takeshi Abe Â
New J. Chem., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ01332D

Interested in reading further? Why not download the full article now, FREE to access for a period of 4 weeks!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Hot article: Glutathione detection using gold nanoparticle assembly

In this NJC paper, Peng Zhang and co-workers (University of Cincinnati, US) have reported the development of a highly sensitive and selective colorimetric detection method for glutathione (GSH) over cysteine (Cys) or homocysteine (Hcy) using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs).

The detection scheme is based on the quasi-stable state of AuNPs in the presence of sodium nitrate and GSH. The significant differences in interparticle forces and the assembly process of AuNPs enable the discrimination of GSH over Cys and Hcy. The presence of GSH can be detected by the naked eye and its concentration determined by UV/Vis spectrometry.

Selective colorimetric detection of glutathione based on quasi-stable gold nanoparticles assembly by Bo Hu, Xian Cao and Peng Zhang New J. Chem., 2013, Advance Article DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ00978E

Interested in reading further? Why not download the full article now, FREE to access for a period of 4 weeks!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Meet our authors of the October issue of NJC

We are pleased to present a selection of our authors of the October issue of NJC. We thank each of them for accepting our invitation and having kindly taken some of their time to answer a few questions for us.

Our first author is Fatima C. Teixeira who is a Researcher at the Laboratorio Nacional de Energia e Geologia in Lisboa (Portugal). Her current research interests are in the field of organic chemistry, especially in the synthesis and characterization of heterocyclic compounds containing phosphonate groups. Currently, her research is focused on the preparation of precursors for new materials for proton exchange membranes with high conductivity for fuel cells. In her NJC paper, Fatima and co-workers report on a new strategy for the synthesis of new diphosphonated azaheterocyclic compounds to become precursors for novel membrane materials for fuel cells. Also, the NMR analysis shows, for a benzimidazole derivative, the presence of only one or both tautomeric forms on the NMR timescale, depending on the solvent and concentration of the solution.

When asked what led to the publication of this article at NJC, Fatima responds: “We choose NJC due to its multidisciplinarity, with a broad and diverse readership, fast publishing time and high quality”.

Out of the lab, Fatima likes to spend time with her family, going to cinema, swimming, reading or travelling.

If Fatima could not be a scientist, she will probably be an engineer.

New azaheterocyclic aromatic diphosphonates for hybrid materials for fuel cell applications by FĂĄtima C. Teixeira, C. M. Rangel and AntĂłnio P. S. Teixeira, New J. Chem., 2013,37, 3084-309 DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ00585B.

Our next author is Ricardo Gargano, Professor at the Institute of Physics of the University of Brasilia (Brazil). Ricardo’s research interests focus on electronic structure calculation and kinetic and dynamic of molecular systems.

In this issue of NJC, Ricardo has authored the article An extensive investigation of reactions involved in the nitrogen trifluoride dissociation by Simone S. Ramalho, Wiliam F. da Cunha, Alessandra F. Albernaz, Pedro H. O. Neto, Geraldo Magela e Silva and Ricardo Gargano, New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 3244-3251 DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ00553D. “The results obtained in our work are of potential use for comparison in future theoretical and experimental works in the NF3 decomposition mechanism”, explains Ricardo who chooses NJC for publication of this article as NJC publishes innovative, original and significant works in Chemistry.

In his free time, Ricardo loves playing soccer and if he was not a scientist, he would like to be a soccer player.

Closing this month’s author selection, Christophe Den Auwer is Professor at the University of Nice Sophia Antipolis in the Institut de Chimie de Nice (France).

His current research interest is radiochemistry – Actinide chemistry in interaction with biotope and human toxicology

He has authored in this NJC issue the paper Multi-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy of thorium, neptunium and plutonium hexacyanoferrate compounds by Thomas Dumas, Marie Christine Charbonnel, Iraida A. Charushnikova, Steven D. Conradson, Clara Fillaux, Christoph Hennig, Philippe Moisy, SĂ©bastien Petit, Andreas C. Scheinost, David K. Shuh, Tolek Tyliszczak and Christophe Den Auwer, New J. Chem., 2013,37, 3003-3016 DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ00318C3. “This paper which is part of the PhD thesis of Thomas Dumas describes some fundamental aspects of actinide chemistry. Few years ago when I was at Commissariat Ă  l’Energie Atomique (CEA) we launched this work on actinide hexacynometallates because the cyanometallate chemistry is so rich.” says Christophe.

Out of the lab, Christophe favourite activities are Mountain hiking and back country skiing.

To the question, If you could not be a scientist but could be anything else, what would you be? Christophe answers “It is of course difficult to answer but I would have liked to work in another type of creating occupation because imagination in science or in artistic fields is the most enjoyable part of our work.”

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Visit September’s issue of NJC.

An article by Antonio Frontera and co-workers (Universitat de les Illes Baleares, Palma de Mallorca, Spain) features on this month’s front cover. In this article, the authors report a theoretical study and Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) analysis of the anion–π binding ability of thiotrithiazyl salts. The anion–π interaction was noticed and described by Woolins and co-workers prior to the original theoretical studies where it was defined and characterized. Therefore, one aim of this manuscript is also to recognize and highlight the manuscript reported by Woolins and co-workers seventeen years ago.

Anion–π interactions in [S4N3]+ rings, Antonio BauzĂĄ, David Quiñonero, Pere M. DeyĂ  and Antonio Frontera, New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 2636-2641 DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ00424D (Article).

The inside cover was produced by Yasuhiro Shiraishi and co-workers (Osaka University, Toyonaka, Japan), presenting a spiropyran–cholesterol conjugate that behaves as a photoresponsive organogelator and is applicable as a material for information storage writable/erasable by light stimuli.

Spiropyran–cholesterol conjugate as a photoresponsive organogelator, Shigehiro Sumiya, Yasuhiro Shiraishi and Takayuki Hirai, New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 2642-2647 DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ00322A (Article).

Take your pick amongst the 7 letters and 38 full papers that composed this issue of September here.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

We invite you to visit the May issue of NJC

A focus article by Ernest Giralt and co-workers opens the May issue on the uses of ion mobility coupled to mass spectrometry (IMMS) to gain structural and dynamic information for a wide variety of biomacromolecules.

Applications and future of ion mobility mass spectrometry in structural biology by Abraham López, Teresa Tarragó, Marta Vilaseca and Ernest Giralt New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 1283-1289 DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ41051J.

The outside front cover was produced by Qin Wei and co-workers on honeycomb-structured macroporous films of graphene nanocomposites prepared by the breath figure method at both an air/solid interface and an air/water interface.

Assembly of graphene nanocomposites into honeycomb-structured macroporous films with enhanced hydrophobicity by Hongmin Ma, Picheng Gao, Dawei Fan, Bin Du, Jingcheng Hao and Qin Wei New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 1307-1311 DOI: 10.1039/C2NJ41031A.

On the inside front cover, Philippe Karoyan and colleagues illustrate their research on the synthesis and study using CD and NMR in water and alcohols on homooligomers of substituted prolines and ïą-prolines.

Homooligomers of substituted prolines and ÎČ-prolines: syntheses and secondary structure investigation by CĂ©cile Caumes, Nicolas Delsuc, Redouane Beni Azza, Isabelle Correia, Fabrice Chemla, Franck Ferreira, Ludovic Carlier, Alejandro Perez Luna, Roba MoumnĂ©, Olivier Lequin and Philippe Karoyan New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 1312-1319 DOI: 10.1039/C3NJ00127J.

Take you pick amongst the 4 letters and 42 full papers that composed this issue of May here.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Meet our authors of the March issue of NJC

We are pleased to present a selection of our authors of the March issue of NJC. We thank each of them for accepting our invitation and having kindly taken some of their time to answer a few questions for us.

Our first author is Thomas Maschmeyer who is Professor of Chemistry at the University of Sidney (Australia) and Director of the Laboratory of Catalysis for Sustainability. His current research interests concerns all aspects of catalysis from new complexes, new materials and performance studies to process development and pilot plants – with the common theme of enhancing sustainability. Thomas and co-workers provide in his NJC paper a basis for the preparation of supported bismuth species and highlights unusual band gap shifts associated with supported cluster size variation.

Thomas chooses NJC as it is a journal that appeared ideal for the dissemination of this type of work that lies at the boundaries of a range of disciplines.

Outside of the lab, Thomas enjoys Kayaking. If he could not be a scientific researcher, he would be an engineer or a novelist.

Unprecedented blue-shift in bismuth oxide supported on mesoporous silica by Antony J. Ward, Anne M. Rich, Anthony F. Masters and Thomas Maschmeyer, New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 593-600 ; DOI: 10.1039/C2NJ40847C, paper.

Our next author is Robert B. King, regents’ Professor Emeritus, University of Georgia (USA); and adjunct Professor of Chemistry, BabeƟ-Bolyai University (Romania); Associate Director of the Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry, South China Normal University (China) and Academic Co-Director of the Research Center for Advanced Computation, Xihua University (China). Robert’s research interests are centred on computational inorganic and organometallic chemistry.

In this issue of NJC, Robert has authored the article Diverse bonding modes of the tetramethyleneethane ligand in binuclear iron carbonyl derivatives by Huidong Li, Hao Feng, Weiguo Sun, Qunchao Fan, Yaoming Xie and R. Bruce King, New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 709-716 ; DOI: 10.1039/C2NJ40644F, paper. “A paper in which density functional methods is used to explore the chemistry of tetramethyleneethane iron carbonyl derivatives related to species originally obtained from reactions of allene with iron carbonyls” explains Robert who chooses NJC for publication of this article as this work is interdisciplinary since it applies methods from quantum physics and chemistry to an area of organometallic chemistry.

In his free time, Robert loves contract Bridge (Bronze Life Master), travel to unusual places and music.

Closing this month’s author selection, Dr. Feng Li is Associate Professor at the Nanjing University of Science and Technology, P. R. China.

His current research interest is organic synthesis/design, exploration and development of environmentally friendly reactions and he has authored in this NJC issue the paper Regioselective N-alkylation with alcohols for the preparation of 2-(N-alkylamino)quinazolines and 2-(N-alkylamino)pyrimidines by Feng Li, Lin Chen, Qikai Kang, Jianguang Cai and Guangjun Zhu, New J. Chem., 2013, 37, 624-631 ; DOI: 10.1039/C2NJ41021D, Paper.

This paper shows that in the presence of the [Cp*IrCl2]2/NaOH system, the direct N-alkylation of 2-aminoquinazolines and 2-aminopyrimidines with alcohols afforded the N-exosubstituted 2-(N-alkylamino)quinazolines and 2-(N-alkylamino)pyrimidines with high yields and complete regioselectivities. The protocol is highly attractive because of easily available starting materials, high atom efficiency and environmental friendliness.

“NJC is prospective and promising journal in the field of chemistry”, says Feng.

Out of the lab, Feng’s favorite activity is sport. If he could not be a scientist, Feng would probably be an Art designer.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Visit the December issue of NJC

An article by B. Mizaikoff and co-workers (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA & University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany) features on this month’s front cover. In this article, the cathodic electropolymerization conditions for poly(4-vinylpyridine) and the uptake characteristics of anions were evaluated with respect to their application for electrochemical sensing.

Investigation of the anion uptake properties of cathodically electropolymerized poly(4-vinylpyridine) membranes, N. Menegazzo, Ch. Kranz and B. Mizaikoff, New J. Chem., 2012, 36, 2460-2466, DOI: 10.1039/c2nj40156h (Article)

The inside cover was produced by H. Sato and co-workers (Ehime University, Matsuyama & National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Japan), presenting preparation of Langmuir-Blodgett films by hybridizing a floating monolayer of an amphiphilic cationic iridium(III) complex with clay particles in a subphase.

Dual emitting Langmuir–Blodgett films of cationic iridium complexes and montmorillonite clay for oxygen sensing, K. Morimoto, T. Nakae, K. Ohara, K. Tamura, S.-I. Nagaoka and H. Sato, New J. Chem., 2012, 36, 2467-2471, DOI: 10.1039/c2nj40351j (Article)

You can access and read the whole of issue 12 here.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Hot Article: One-pot pyrolytic synthesis of C-N codoped titania

In this NJC paper, Liang Li (School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China) and Jianlin Shi (Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China) et al. report a simple but efficient, controlled thermal decomposition approach to fabricate polycrystalline mesoporous C-N-codoped anatase TiO2.

The prepared material possesses a high surface area and extraordinary high photocatalytic degradation properties under visible irradiation.

One-pot pyrolytic synthesis of C–N-codoped mesoporous anatase TiO2 and its highly efficient photo-degradation properties by Liang Li, Jingjing Shi, Gengnan Li, Yinyin Yuan, Yongsheng Li, Wenru Zhao and Jianlin Shi New J. Chem., 2012, Advance Article DOI: 10.1039/C2NJ40901A

Interested in reading further? Why not download the full article now, FREE to access for a period of 4 weeks!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Meet our authors of the October issue of NJC

We are pleased to present a selection of our authors of the October issue of NJC. We thank each of them for accepting our invitation and having kindly taken some of their time to answer a few questions for us.

Our first author is Khaleda Banu who is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of California San Diego (USA). Her current research interests are mainly focused on the synthesis of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles and their application in the fields of renewable energy and microbial fuel cells. In her NJC paper, Khaleda and co-workers report on how a simple modification to the solid-matrix method could generate large-scale transparent gold nanosheets up to 50 mm in size that are attractive for the development of new biosensors.

When asked what led to the publication of this article at NJC, Khaleda responds: “The present paper is an extension of previous work published in NJC. Our intention was to publish a series of papers on the proposed electroless method for the deposition of various metal nanoparticles which can receive the attention of the interested readers”.

Out of the lab, Khaleda enjoy kid’s gymnastic activities, teaching students and reviewing papers.

If Khaleda could not be a scientist, she would probably like to be an actress or a professional chess player.

Synthesis of large-scale transparent gold nanosheets sandwiched between stabilizers at a solid–liquid interface
by Khaleda Banu and Takayoshi Shimura, New J. Chem., 2012, 36, 2112-2120; DOI: 10.1039/C2NJ40478H.

Our next author is Huanshun Yin, Lecturer at the Shandong Agricultural University (China). Huanshun’s research interests focus on electroanalytical chemistry, electrochemical biosensors and electrochemical immunoassays.

In this issue of NJC, Huanshun has authored the article MicroRNA-21 detection based on molecular switching by amperometry by Yunlei Zhou, Zhaoyan Zhang, Zhenning Xu, Huanshun Yin and Shiyun Ai, New J. Chem., 2012, 36, 1985-1991; DOI: 10.1039/C2NJ40253J. “We developed an assay method that can discriminate complementary base mismatched microRNA sequences. More importantly, this biosensor assay reveals that microRNA-21 is highly expressed in human HeLa cells and in normal human hepatic cells. We think that such a method would be valuable in clinical diagnostics”, explains Huanshun who chooses NJC for publication of this article as NJC is an RSC important international journal.

In his free time, Huanshun loves spending time doing car rides. If Huanshun was not a scientist, he would have been a teacher.

Dyanne Cruickshang is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Cape Town (South Africa).

Her current research interest is the beneficiation of both agrochemicals and other active pharmaceutical ingredients using supramolecular methods such as co-crystallisation and cyclodextrin inclusion which has been her focus over the last few years.

In this NJC issue paper, Dyanne and co-authors highlight the ability of highly toxic and persistent agrochemical to form cyclodextrin inclusion complexes. The work presented focuses mainly on the single crystal structure of the complex between dimethylated b-cyclodextrin and endosulfan. It also shows how the potential of cyclodextrins in the agrochemical industry and how these molecules could be used for sequestering the insecticides from contaminated areas.

A solid-state study of the inclusion of endosulfan in native and derivatised cyclodextrins using X-ray diffraction and thermoanalytical methods by Dyanne L. Cruickshank, Susan A. Bourne and Mino R. Caira, New J. Chem., 2012, 36, 2007-2013; DOI: 10.1039/C2NJ40364A.

“NJC was chosen as it contains articles spanning a wide spectrum of interests to the scientific community. This journal seemed like an ideal way to demonstrate the relatively new area of cyclodextrin inclusion of agrochemicals and the potential applications of these complexes.”

Cycling, running or swimming along the Cape Peninsula in preparation for various triathlon events are Dyanne’s favourite activities. She also enjoys travelling and trying the local foods. If she could not be a scientist, Dyanne would probably be involved in some sort of teaching career.

Closing this month’s author selection, Marian Davolos is Full Professor at the Sao Paulo State University (Brazil).

Her current research interest is investigating optical properties of inorganic materials. She has authored in this NJC issue the paper Synthesis of a functionalized europium complex and deposition of luminescent Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) films by Renata D. Adati, Felippe J. Pavinatto, Jorge H. S. K. Monteiro, Marian R. Davolos, Miguel Jafelicci and Osvaldo N. Oliveira, New J. Chem., 2012, 36, 1978-1984; DOI: 10.1039/C2NJ40199A. “An anionic europium complex stabilized by and amphiphilic cation was proven amenable to deposit as LB films with relatively intense luminescence and good stability” says Marian.

Out of the lab, Marian’s favorite activity is to grow and to care for orchids and if she was not a scientist, she would be a florist or a gardener.

Marian also says that “To grow and care for plants is fantastic, especially when they give beautiful flowers and fruits. Teaching, lecturing, advising scientific work of students and guiding them to work and to make scientific research part of their life is highly satisfactory compared to growing delicate plants. Renata D. Adati, a co-author in this paper, that is part of her thesis, was one of my specials PhD students.”

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Hot paper : Eu(diketonato) Complexes with potential applications in biological assays.

In this NJC paper, Marina Lezhnina et al (Muenster University of Applied Sciences-Chemical Engineering, Germany) report the synthesis and photophysical properties of Eu complexes attached to epoxy-functionalized phenantroline ligands.

The authors show how these complexes can be conveniently attached to thiol groups, in the present example gluthathione, and still retain the characteristic red emission of Eu centers.

Luminescence of a Novel Eu(diketonato) – Epoxyphenanthroline Complex and Covalent Coupling to Peptides via the Epoxigroup Marina M. Lezhnina, Diana Hofmann, Beatrix Santiago-SchĂŒbel, Peter Klauth, Ulrich H. Kynast New J. Chem., 2012, Advance Article DOI: 10.1039/C2NJ40505A

Interested in reading further? Why not download the full article now, FREE to access for a period of 4 weeks!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)