PhoBiA Annual Nanophotonics International Conference 2017

The Photonics and Bionanotechnology Association “PhoBiA” are inviting all young scientists and students to attend the 8th Edition of the PhoBiA Annual Nanophotonics International Conference “PANIC” which will take place from 24 – 26 April, 2017 in Wroclaw, Poland.

This meeting intends to gather students and young scientists working on the borders between chemistry, physics, and biology to enable them to share knowledge by presenting their work in a conference setting. A plenary lecture will take place each day, presented by a renowned scientist from the field of photonics, bio-, or nanotechnology.

Nanoscale Horizons is proud to sponsor student prizes for the best poster and the best oral presentation! The abstract submission deadline is only days away, so to be in with a chance of winning a signed certificate and one years free subscription to the journal Nanoscale, published by the Royal Society of Chemistry submit by 26 March!

PANIC 2017 is organised by students for students, so sign up before 2 April to take part.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

ICONAN 2017

ICONAN 2017 International Conference on Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology will take place from 25 – 27 September at University Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona, welcoming world-class researchers from around the world to promote the exchange of knowledge.

This conference offers the opportunity to hear the latest updates on recent research on a variety of nanomedicine & nanobiotechnology topics through a combination of plenary lectures, invited speakers and specific workshops. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Targeted drug delivery and nanocarriers
  • Nanomedicine for cancer diagnosis & therapy
  • Biological & medical nanodevices and biosensors
  • Tissue engineering and regenerative nanomedicine
  • Toxicology and risk assessment of nanomedicine systems
  • Nano-imaging for diagnosis, therapy, and delivery
  • Bionanocatalysis and nanobiosystems
  • Microfluidics in nanomedicine and nanobiology

Submission is now open for abstracts through Exordo, with the early-bird submission deadline on 14 April. Submit now to present your research to leading nanomedicine & nanobiotechnology researchers, and to be in with a chance of winning a prize sponsored by Nanoscale Horizons!

Visit the conference web page for a more details on the 12 plenary speakers and registration deadlines.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Outstanding Reviewers for Nanoscale Horizons in 2016

Following the success of Peer Review Week in September 2016 (dedicated to reviewer recognition) during which we published a list of our top reviewers, we are delighted to announce that we will continue to recognise the contribution that our reviewers make to the journal by announcing our Outstanding Reviewers each year.

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Nanoscale Horizons in 2016, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Dr Arun Chattopadhyay, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati
Professor Kenneth Dawson, University College Dublin
Dr Minghua Liu, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences
Professor Shouheng Sun, Brown University
Professor Jianfang Wang, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

We would also like to thank the Nanoscale Horizons board and the nanoscience community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé. You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Tuneable graphene surfaces for water purification and energy storage

The sustainability issues of efficient energy storage and water purification are of vital importance to the long-term future of the planet. Researchers from Zhejiang University have developed a new nanostructured graphene material with a tuneable surface texture which can be used to for enhanced water purification and energy storage applications.

Inspired by the hierarchical structures and microscopic surface textures of the dry-climate plant Callitris endlicheri, the graphene structures use capillary effects to transport and store water in a similar way, but at much smaller length scales. Typically, tuneable surfaces such as these, require chemical surface modifications; but this Nanoscale Horizons article outlines a new method involving plasma-assisted growth of graphene ‘nano-flaps’ covalently bonded to micro-sized vertical grapheme graphene wells (termed ‘Sub-μGW’). The surfaces showed better water purification of metal nanoparticles from water and remarkable electrochemical performance in supercapacitors (2.5x higher specific capacitance of Sub-μGW electrodes). These excellent properties are attributed to enhanced solid-liquid interfacing leading to a super hydrophilic surface by reduction of air bubbles, and better device performance.

In the future, this biomimetic approach could be used to control the wettability of a range of porous microstructured surfaces, and could lead to further breakthroughs in important areas such as energy storage and conversion, water purification, and biomedical devices.

 

Fig. 1. SEM images of grapheme nanostructures showing the decreasing nanotexture densities from (d) to (f). (g) Schematic of the capillarity driven modification process for the adjustment of the nanotexture density in Sub-mGWs.

 

Read the article:
Tuneable fluidics within graphene nanogaps for water purification and energy storage
Zheng Bo, Yilei Tian, Zhao Jun Han, Shenghao Wu, Shuo Zhang, Jianhua Yan, Kefa Cena and Kostya Ostrikov
Nanoscale Horizons, 2017, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C6NH00167J

 

Alexander Cook is a guest web writer for the RSC journal blogs. He is a PhD researcher in the Perrier group at the University of Warwick, focusing on polymer materials and their use in various applications. Follow him on twitter @alexcook222

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

New magnetofluidic “tweezers” capable of manipulating a single living cell

Written by Susannah May

Confocal images of a single cell under the magnetic micropen before and after turning on the external field

Single cell manipulation can provide insight into cell mechanics and adhesion, and has a crucial role in in vitro fertilization (IVF). Bartusz Grzybowski at Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology in South Korea and his team’s new technique for this doesn’t need cells to be magnetically tagged beforehand. It also avoids the risks of heat- or stress-induced cell damage that can occur with other methods.

Grzybowski et al.’s method relies on an iron oxide nanoparticle medium in which cells are suspended. Applying an electromagnet to the magnetic medium through a micropen creates field gradients, which direct the cell to move in a certain direction. By varying how the micropen “tweezers” are positioned, cell movement can be manipulated in both 2 and 3 dimensions.

As well as controlling a single cell, the micropen can be used to pick up several cells together and guide them into regularly shaped clusters. Although it’s a long way off, this could one day be used to make IVF processes more efficient, reducing the number of potential embryos that need to be discarded. It could also be extended to manipulating bacteria and other single-celled organisms to conduct detailed studies on their behaviour.

Read the full article for free, here:
Trapping, manipulation and crystallization of live cells using magnetofluidic tweezers
J. V. I. Timonen, C. Raimondo, D. Pilans, P. P. Pillai and B. A. Grzybowski
Nanoscale Horiz., 2016, Advance Article

Susannah May is a guest web writer for the RSC Journal blogs. She currently works in the Publishing Department of the Royal Society of Chemistry, and has a keen interest in biology and biomedicine, and the frontiers of their intersection with chemistry. She can be found on Twitter using @SusannahCIMay.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Introducing the Nanoscale Horizons Community Board

Our early career researcher Advisory Board

After the successes of the Materials Horizons Community Board launched last year, we have created a Community Board for Nanoscale Horizons. These Board members will provide invaluable feedback regarding journal activities, as well as being ambassadors for the journal.

We requested nominations from our Board members, as well as from the wider academic community over the summer, and were thrilled with the high calibre of candidates nominated.

We are now delighted to announce the members of the Nanoscale Horizons Community Board. The Board consists of 32 international researchers at different stages of their early careers, ranging from PhD candidates to Associate Professors.

Read more about our Board members below. We have also expanded the Materials Horizons Community Board, find out more here.

Julian Bergueiro Álvarez
Dr Julian Bergueiro received his BS and MS in Chemistry from the University of Santiago de Compostela (Spain) in 2007 and 2008, respectively. In 2013 he received his PhD from USC under the supervision of Prof. S. Lopez. In 2012 he joined the group of Prof. R. Riguera to work on the synthesis and characterization of stimuli-response helical polymers and poly(phenylacetylene)s@gold nanoparticle nanocomposites. He joined Prof. M. Calderon group in 2013 to carry out his postdoctoral research at Freie Universität Berlin. He was awarded with a Dahlem International Net-work Postdocs Fellowship to develop gold based thermoresponsive nanogels as nanocarriers.
Simone Bertolazzi
Simone is postdoctoral researcher (Marie Curie Intra-European Fellow) at the Institut de Science et d’Ingénierie Supramoléculaires in Strasbourg, France, working with Prof. Paolo Samorì. He received a B.S. degree in Engineering Physics from Politecnico di Milano (2007) and M.S. degrees from Politecnico di Milano (2010) and École Polytechnique de Montréal (2011). He then obtained a PhD in Physics from École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, where he conducted his doctoral work in the group of Prof. Andras Kis. His current research activities focus on hybrid multifunctional materials based on two-dimensional crystals and molecular systems.
Randy Carney
Dr. Randy Carney is a postdoctoral scholar working in the lab of Prof. Kit Lam at the University of California Davis Medical Center, where he leads the extracellular vesicle research team. He specializes in nano-characterization schemes and exosome isolation. Recently, Dr. Carney and his team have developed methods for optical trapping and Raman characterization of single vesicles derived from a variety of tumor biofluids. Dr. Carney also has an extensive background in gold nanoparticle synthesis, characterization, and cell delivery, all topics of his Ph.D. work with Prof. Francesco Stellacci (MIT/EPFL).
Read more »
Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

HOT article: Making metal surfaces strong, resistant, and multifunctional by nanoscale-sculpturing

Written by Susannah May

Fig. 1 Schematic images of sculptured metal surfaces.

Surface properties are critically important for metal applications, especially when using alloys or composite. A key factor in these properties is the layers of metal oxide that develop on metal surfaces – how these layers form and dissolve has a huge impact on the surface stability. Conventional methods for creating metal surfaces often result in uneven oxide layers, weakening the properties.

Nanosculpturing, on the other hand, allows oxide deposition and dissolution to be controlled so that they can be evenly spread. This gives the surfaces the same properties across their whole area, making them very stable. Adelung’s group used a careful balancing act between direct and indirect dissolution, which gave them the benefits of both.

The nanoscale sculptured surfaces were also remarkably corrosion-resistant, and could be made hydrophobic or hydrophilic by alternately dehydrating or hydrating the oxide layer. With its property-boosting effects and wide scope, nanoscale sculpturing could soon be used for an array of metal applications.

Read the full article here:
Making metal surfaces strong, resistant, and multifunctional by nanoscale-sculpturing
M. Baytekin-Gerngross, M. D. Gerngross, J. Carstensen and R. Adelung
Nanoscale Horiz., 2016, Advance Article

Susannah May is a guest web writer for the RSC Journal blogs. She currently works in the Publishing Department of the Royal Society of Chemistry, and has a keen interest in biology and biomedicine, and the frontiers of their intersection with chemistry. She can be found on Twitter using @SusannahCIMay.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Graphene Canada 2016

Nanoscale Horizons is thrilled to announce its support of Graphene Canada 2016. We will be providing a prize for the best poster consisting of a certificate and an online subscription to one of Materials Horizons, Nanoscale, Journals of Materials Chemistry A, B or C, worth in excess of £1500.

Montreal (Canada) will host the 2nd edition of the Graphene & 2D Materials International Conference and Exhibition: October 18-20, 2016

The Graphene Conference will be a 3 days event that means to gather the key players of the Graphene Community and related sectors. This event is launched following the lack of meetings in the field in Canada and aims to become an established event, attracting global participants, intent on sharing, exchanging and exploring new avenues of graphene-related scientific and commercial developments

The Industrial Forum will present the most recent advances in technology developments and business opportunities in graphene commercialization. Key representatives of “graphene companies” will share their market vision and business opportunities, while selected talks from industrial exhibitors will present commercial showcases in all current market fields of graphene products.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Nominations to Nanoscale Horizons Community Board now open!

Nominations open until 15th August

Last year, our sister journal, Materials Horizons, announced the first ever early career researcher board – a Community Board. This Board is unique in that it is made up of early career researchers, such as PhD students and postdocs, who are fundamental in the future development of the materials field.

Since then, the members of the Community Board have provided invaluable feedback and advice to the Materials Horizons Editorial Office.

Based on its success so far, we are now creating a Community Board for Nanoscale Horizons.

Are you interested in helping shape a journal publishing cutting-edge research of exceptional significance? Do you have ideas on how high impact journals can engage and support early career researchers? If so, please get in touch!

Simply ask your Principal Investigator to submit your nomination with the information outlined in the documents below to nanoscalehorizons-rsc@rsc.org.

If you have any questions at all, please contact nanoscalehorizons-rsc@rsc.org. We look forward to hearing from you!

Nanoscale Horizons Community Board – Call for Nominations

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

HOT article: Porous silicon–graphene oxide core–shell nanoparticles for targeted delivery of siRNA to the injured brain

Written by Susannah May

Time-gated luminescence image of injured mouse brains. Dashed white circles indicate region of penetrating brain injury. Targeted and nontargeted nanoparticles are compared. Inset: Bright field image (in gray scale) under ambient light.

A novel siRNA delivery system that could pave the way for genetic treatment of cancer, neurogenerative diseases or even HIV has been described in a new HOT article published in Nanoscale Horizons.

Over the last few years siRNA (small interfering RNA) has gained increasing attention as a new way to treat genetic diseases or viruses by silencing the genes responsible – the RNA fragments prevent the proteins that cause the illness from ever being expressed in the first place, making it the ultimate preventative therapy. However, current efforts have been hampered by the difficulty of delivering the delicate siRNA to the brain in one piece, before it’s degraded or attacked by the body’s immune defences.

This new system, developed by Michael Sailor’s team at the University of California, San Diego, uses porous silica nanoparticles as a protective carrier of the siRNA – the siRNA is hidden inside the pores of the nanoparticles where it’s protected from the body’s immune responses and harsh cell environments. A graphene oxide shell around the nanoparticles ensures that the siRNA stays safely inside them until they reach the brain. They will then release the still-intact siRNA,  where it prevents sections of DNA from producing damaging proteins.  The nanoparticles, which are fluorescent and easily tracked on their journey through the body, can be targeted to specific brain cells by attaching certain peptides; when the researchers attached rabies virus glycoprotein to the nanoparticles,  their uptake by neuronal cells doubled. The system successfully silenced genes in cell cultures – even in the presence of RNA-degrading nucleases – and, promisingly, proved capable of delivering siRNA to the brains of live mice who had suffered brain injuries. Significantly more of the siRNA-carrying nanoparticles accumulated around damaged tissues than the healthy brain tissues, and released large quantities of siRNA once they got there.

Although it’s early days, the system shows great promise for genetic therapies using siRNA. By using siRNAs to silence the genes responsible for out-of-control replication of cells, it could one day be used in the prevention of cancer – and siRNAs targeted to viral proteins could even be used to successfully treat HIV.

Read the full article here:

Porous silicon–graphene oxide core–shell nanoparticles for targeted delivery of siRNA to the injured brain
Jinmyoung Joo, Ester J. Kwon, Jinyoung Kang, Matthew Skalak, Emily J. Anglin, Aman P. Mann, Erkki Ruoslahti, Sangeeta N. Bhatia and Michael J. Sailor
Nanoscale Horiz., 2016, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C6NH00082G

Susannah May is a guest web writer for the RSC Journal blogs. She currently works in the Publishing Department of the Royal Society of Chemistry, and has a keen interest in biology and biomedicine, and the frontiers of their intersection with chemistry. She can be found on Twitter using @SusannahCIMay.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)