Archive for the ‘Themed Issue’ Category

Metal-mediated protein aggregation in neurodegenerative diseases

The pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases is associated with intrinsically disordered proteins that interact with metals, misfold, and aggregate.

Read this interesting review from Leonid Breydo and Vladimir Uversky exploring timely and important questions surrounding the interaction of metal ions with intrinsically unstable proteins and how this leads to protein fibrillation.  Research in this area is paramount for understanding neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and prion disease, and hence developing protective strategies for them.

You can read the review for free until 6th October.

Role of metal ions in aggregation of intrinsically disordered proteins in neurodegenerative diseases
Leonid Breydo and Vladimir N. Uversky
Metallomics
DOI: 10.1039/C1MT00106J

Breydo and Uversky mention a couple of papers from our Metals in Neurodegenerative Disease themed issue that we published earlier this year:

 Metallomics, 2011, 3(3):217-304

Metallomics, 2011, 3(3):217-304

Interactions of Zn(II) and Cu(II) ions with Alzheimer’s amyloid-beta peptide. Metal ion binding, contribution to fibrillization and toxicity
Vello Tõugu, Ann Tiiman and Peep Palumaa
Metallomics, 2011, 3, 250-261
DOI: 10.1039/C0MT00073F

Role of metal dyshomeostasis in Alzheimer’s disease
David J. Bonda, Hyoung-gon Lee, Jeffrey A. Blair, Xiongwei Zhu, George Perry and Mark A. Smith
Metallomics, 2011, 3, 267-270
DOI: 10.1039/C0MT00074D

Recap on Vladimir’s other Metallomics critical review from last year…

Metalloproteomics and metal toxicology of α-synuclein
Aaron Santner and Vladimir N. Uversky
Metallomics, 2010, 2, 378-392
DOI: 10.1039/B926659C

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Chromate vs Sulfur

Cellular chromium toxicity may be underpinned by its sulfur depleting action.

Simon Avery and Sara Holland from the University of Nottingham explain the current thinking on how chromium interferes in sulfur metabolism.  The minireview incorporates the interactions of chromium with cellular sulfur ligands, chromate uptake by sulfate transporteres as well as the implications of these findings in humans.

This is a model Metallomics paper and you can read it for free until the 13th September.

Chromate toxicity and the role of sulfur
Sara L. Holland and Simon V. Avery
Metallomics
DOI: 10.1039/C1MT00059D

Avery and Holland’s review is due to be published in our themed issue on Metal Toxicity later in the year.  Below are some of the other papers due for inclusion in the Metal Toxicity issue that are already available online:

Development of highly effective three-component cytoprotective adjuncts for cisplatin cancer treatment: synthesis and in vivo evaluation in S180-bearing mice
Yuji Wang, Lei Wei, Ming Zhao, Shenghui Mei, Meiqing Zheng, Yifan Yang, Hong Wang, Gong Chen and Shiqi Peng
Metallomics
DOI: 10.1039/C1MT00013F

Toxic elements in tobacco and in cigarette smoke: inflammation and sensitization
R. Steve Pappas
Metallomics
DOI: 10.1039/C1MT00066G

Mechanisms of nickel toxicity in microorganisms
Lee Macomber and Robert P. Hausinger
Metallomics
DOI: 10.1039/C1MT00063B

The oxidative stress of zinc deficiency
David J. Eide
Metallomics
DOI: 10.1039/C1MT00064K

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The oxidative stress of zinc deficiency

Possible sources of reactive oxygen species in zinc-limited cells.

Zinc is incredibly important for correct cellular function, acting as an essential cofactor for up-to 10% of the proteins encoded by the human genome.  It acts as an antioxidant with increased reactive oxygen species production occurring as a result of zinc deficiency.

Read this minireview for free until 6th September for a summary of the current thinking on potential sources of oxidative stress in zinc deficiency and the homeostatic and regulatory methods which attempt to alleviate it.

The oxidative stress of zinc deficiency
David J. Eide
Metallomics
DOI: 10.1039/C1MT00064K

This paper will be included in a themed issue on Metal Toxicity, Guest Edited by Gregor Grass ad Christopher Rensing, to be published later this year.

Metallomics, 2011, 2(5): 306-317

You might also like to read the review we featured on the inside front cover of issue 5 last year covering a similar topic…

Cytosolic zinc buffering and muffling: Their role in intracellularzinc homeostasis
Robert A. Colvin, William R. Holmes, Charles P. Fontaine and Wolfgang Maret
Metallomics, 2010, 2, 306-317
DOI: 10.1039/B926662C

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Metallomics themed issue – Metals and Genetics

Please note – submission deadline updated!

We are delighted to announce that Metallomics will be publishing a themed issue on the topic of  Metals and Genetics.

All papers presented at the upcoming International Conference on Metals and Genetics (ICMG2011), to be held in Kobe, Japan are invited for consideration in the issue.

The deadline for article to be submitted for the themed issue is 1st January 2012. Communications, Papers, Critical and Mini Reviews are all welcome. Please include in your covering letter that your article is for consideration in the themed issue, and submit through the journal website.

If you are attending ICMG2011 in September and would like to meet up – please do get in touch and I look forward to seeing you there!

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Themed issue now online: Metallomics in Japan

Metallomics, 2011, 3(7): 635-750

Our themed issue highlighting the best work in the field from Japan is now available online.

The guest editors introduce this issue:

Hiroki Haraguchi takes a look at the state of metallomics in Japan

- Hiroyuki Yasui gives an overview of the Metallomics Research Forum in Japan, from where papers for the issue were invited.

On the front cover, the unmistakeable beauty of Mt. Fuji provides the backdrop for the tutorial review by Toshiyuki Fukada and Taiho Kambe looking at the crucial roles of zinc transporters in biological phenomena.

Tutorial Review: Molecular and genetic features of zinc transporters in physiology and pathogenesis
Toshiyuki Fukada and Taiho Kambe
Metallomics, 2011, 3, 662-674
DOI: 10.1039/C1MT00011J

The inside front cover cover highlights a communication from Ryota Saito and colleagues about zinc(II) complexes with in vitro insulin-mimetic activity, whilst capturing a message of hope in the face of the recent adversity faced in Japan.

Communication: Synthesis and in vitro insulin-mimetic activities of zinc(II) complexes of ethyl 2,5-dihydro-4-hydroxy-5-oxo-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxylates
Hikaru Kawarada, Yutaka Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki Yasui, Shunsuke Kuwahara, Yoichi Habata and Ryota Saito
Metallomics, 2011, 3, 675-679
DOI: 10.1039/C1MT00009H

Both cover articles will be free to access for the next 5 weeks.

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Editorial for the Metallomics in Japan themed issue

The meeting was a great success, and Metallomics is delighted to publish papers from authors who presented

In this accompanying editorial, Professor Hiroyuki Yasui of Kyoto Pharmaceutical University gives his overview of the Metallomics Research Forum in Japan in his capacity as second Metallomics Research Forum Chairman:

First of all, we wish to express our heartfelt and deepest sympathy to all those who have been afflicted by the Big Tohoku-Kanto Earthquake and Tsunami on March 11, 2011 which struck the Pacific coast of the northeastern region of Japan. We have received a great many messages from overseas associates and fellowships, for which we offer our heartfelt acknowledgments. We wish full recovery to affected persons and cities before long.

It gives me immense pleasure to publish the special issue “Metallomics in Japan” that contains 8 papers, 3 communications, and 3 reviews, which were on the basis of the best highlighted presentations in the second Metallomics Research Forum in Kyoto on November 2-3, 2010.

The Metallomics Research Forum in Japan was first held in 2008 by Professor Shuichi Enomoto of Okayama University, and we had the second opportunity to host it with our staff and students in Kyoto Pharmaceutical University.  The aim of the forum is to share and integrate the recent advances at the cross-roads of research on the basic, clinical, and environmental studies of chemical and biological metal-ion sciences, in a comprehensive manner.  To this end, we were very gratified that there were over 120 participants who exchanged information and knowledge through the discussion of experimental and newly-found ideas.  It is hoped that this research forum will continue to contribute to the development of cutting-edge research and hot topics in the years of post-genomic study to stimulate the development of metallomics research in Japan.

This second forum in Japan featured two invited plenary lectures, six lectures for two symposiums (basic research and clinical study), 18 oral presentations, 32 poster presentations, and two extension lectures for general citizens from a variety of scientific backgrounds such as analytical chemistry, bioinorganic chemistry, molecular and cellular biology, pharmacology, toxicology, medicine, and nutrition.

Professor Ashley I. Bush of the University of Melbourne from Australia presented very excellently on “The pivotal role of zinc in Alzheimer’s disease”. His lecture made us understand the importance of the mechanisms of metal ion-related life events, which will contribute surely to both the promotion of human health and prevention and treatment of human diseases.

Among the speakers in the symposium of basic research on analysis, molecular imaging, and physiology of metal ions, Dr Toshiyuki Fukada of RIKEN contributes a tutorial review to this issue on in collaboration with Associate Professor Taiho Kambe of Kyoto University*. This article features as the issue’s front cover.

Molecular and genetic features of zinc transporters in physiology and pathogenesis
Toshiyuki Fukada and Taiho Kambe
Metallomics, 2011, 3, 662-674
DOI: 10.1039/C1MT00011J

(this article will be free to access for six weeks)

In addition, in the symposium of clinical study on metal ions-related pathogenesis such as cancer, heart disease, and internal pollution, Professor Shinya Toyokuni of Nagoya University had a nice talk about “The study and mechanism of iron excess-induced carcinogenesis”, and Dr Masashi Uwabu, a clinician, presented on the important topic of “Diagnosis and treatment of poisonous heavy metal ions in clinical practice of Japan”.

As the activities of young scientists are essential for future development of this research field, we presented both best oral and poster presentation prizes provided by the RSC, in which Associate Professor Shoichiro Asayama of Tokyo Metropolitan University had been awarded a best oral presentation prize, and Dr Yutaka Yoshikawa of Kyoto Pharmaceutical University and Dr Kazumi Inagaki of AIST had been awarded poster prizes.

Finally, I wish to express my appreciation to Dr May Copsey, the Editor of Metallomics, authors in this memorial and special issue, the organising committee members, conference participants, and many sponsoring companies for their generous assistance.

And we would like to thank Professor Yasui and all those involved with the themed issue.  Do head over to the journal homepage to take a look at the themed issue and all the excellent work from Japan that it highlights, including the Editorial from Professor Hiroki Haraguchi:

Editorial: Metallomics in Japan
Hiroki Haraguchi
Metallomics, 2011, 3, 648-649
DOI: 10.1039/C1MT90027G

*You can read an interview with our cover articles authors here.

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Metallomics 2011 – submit your work to the themed issue!

Metallomics 2011, or the Third International Symposium on Metallomics takes place next week in Münster.

We are delighted to say that Metallomics has been chosen as the recommended journal for publication of work from this exciting conference!

Submitted papers, based on oral or poster presentations given at the meeting, will be considered for publication as original research papers in Metallomics (i.e. full papers and urgent communications).

The submission deadline is 15th July and publication of the issue is scheduled for December 2011.

Articles can be submitted by upload through the journal website. We look forward to receiving your article soon!

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First article from Metal Toxicity themed issue online!

A co-administration regimen of cisplatin plus N-glucosyl-N-dithiocarbamateamino acid disodium compounds was explored and has been shown to improve the therapy of S180-bearing mice for the first time.

The first paper which will be included in our themed issue on Metal Toxicity has been published online:

Development of highly effective three-component cytoprotective adjuncts for cisplatin cancer treatment: synthesis and in vivo evaluation in S180-bearing mice
Yuji Wang, Lei Wei, Ming Zhao, Shenghui Mei, Meiqing Zheng, Yifan Yang, Hong Wang, Gong Chen and Shiqi Peng
Metallomics, 2011, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C1MT00013F

The deadline for submissions to the themed issue is 17 June so there’s still time to submit your paper.

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Meet our authors: Toshiyuki Fukada and Taiho Kambe

Metallomics wouldn’t exist if it wasn’t for our authors so we’d like to get to know them a bit better and discover the people behind the science.  We’ve just published a tutorial review by Toshiyuki Fukada and Taiho Kambe; they were kind enough to answer my questions and you can read their responses below.

Their tutorial review will be published in our Metallomics in Japan themed issue this summer and I’m pleased to let blog readers know that we’ll be featuring the paper on the front cover of that issue so keep your eyes peeled!

Toshiyuki Fukada (left) and Taiho Kambe (right)

Molecular and genetic features of zinc transporters in physiology and pathogenesis
Toshiyuki Fukada and Taiho Kambe
Metallomics, 2011
DOI: 10.1039/c1mt00011j

What initially inspired you to become a scientist?
Toshiyuki Fukada: I grew up in Shizuoka prefecture, where I enjoyed nature: ocean, rivers, mountains, and Mt. Fuji. These natural circumstances during childhood definitely stimulated my interest in nature. And I cannot forget two teachers, Ms Tomiko Maruo in my elementary school and Ms Naoko Makimoto in my high school, who inspired me to choose science as a career.
Taiho Kambe: When I was a boy, I was fascinated by the wonders of fermentation. Microorganisms make various delicious foods! Yoghurt, cheese, miso, soy source, etc. During my undergraduate study I was greatly enchanted by biochemistry thus I chose to pursue a doctorate in this field.

What do you love about your job?
TF: Scientific activities can generate creativity, and the possibility of the infinite.
TK: It is the privilege of scientists to search for truth, find something new, invent a novel machine, and make new effective medicine etc. I love this point in my job. Zinc research is a  new research field and there are many things to be solved in the future.

Where do you see your research heading next?
TF: Resolving the structure of mammalian zinc transporters, and the mechanisms of how zinc transporters are activated or inactivated.
TK: We are very interested in when, where, and how zinc transporters monitor zinc concentrations and control the influx and efflux of zinc, and when, where, and how zinc-containing proteins capture and dissociate zinc mediated by zinc transporters in the correct location.

What’s hot at the moment/going to be next big thing in your field?
TF: Since I have my research background in the investigation of intracellular signal transduction, I am keen to know the mechanisms of how each of the zinc transporters determines their biological specificities to control intracellular signaling pathways. That should be the next big subject.
TK: Recently, increased evidence has revealed the importance of zinc in physiological and patho-physiological functions. A number of efficient Zn-related drugs will be developed, and will contribute to human health.

What do enjoy doing in your spare time?
TF: In my spare time, my passion is Aikido, a Japanese martial art.  I have enjoyed training for over 25 years.   I also enjoy listening to classical music and visiting art museums: I am a fan of Wagner for music, Rembrandt and Taro Okamoto for paintings.
TK: Hiking in Kyoto city with my family. There are many temples and shrines in Kyoto city because Kyoto has a long history as an old capital in Japan.

What would you be if you weren’t a scientist, what would you be?
TF: I would open and teach at my own dojo.
TK: I had belonged to baseball teams for 12 years since I was 5 years old. So, if I weren’t a scientist, I would like to be a baseball player.

Collaborations form a large part of modern scientific research. Which scientist, past or present, would you really like to work with?
TF: Physicians and medical scientists, since I am interested in the roles of zinc and zinc transporters in health and disease. Dr Shiro Ikegawa and Andrea Superti-Furga are the scientists whom I really would like to work again.
TK: That is somewhat a difficult question. Since zinc research field ranges widely, I would like to work with anyone in any field who can help to solve any questions involved in zinc. I think the proverb “Four eyes see more than two” holds true for zinc research very much.

If you could solve any scientific problem in any field, what would it be?
TF: Preventing desertification in the world, if I could.
TK: I would like to find and develop safe and cheap energy resources. As you know, a terrible earthquake and tsunami hit Japan. Now we have serious problems with nuclear reactors, which have caused severe electric energy shortages in Tokyo. That presents a major challenge.

It’s the International Year of Chemistry – what one discovery or development would you like to highlight?
TF: The Light Emitting Diode, it has changed our lifestyles.
TK: The lithium-ion battery, which will contribute more to resolution of social problems concerning resources, environment and energy faced by human beings.

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Cytochromes themed issue now online!

Guest Editors Peter Roos (L) and Norbert Jakubowski (R)

Our themed issue on Cytochromes is now online, highlighting some of the best research in the area.

Guest Editors Norbert Jakubowski and Peter Roos introduce the issue in their Editorial:

Cytochromes—fascinating molecular machines
Peter H. Roos and Norbert Jakubowski
Metallomics, 2011, 3, 316-318
DOI: 10.1039/C1MT90012A

On the front cover, a striking image related to a Perspective by Julie Stevens on the use of Cytochrome c as an experimental protein:

Metallomics, 2011, 3(4):305-434

Perspective: Cytochrome c as an experimental model protein
Julie M. Stevens
Metallomics, 2011, 3, 319-322
DOI: 10.1039/C0MT00089B

The inside front cover features a paper by Ricardo Louro and colleagues looking at the role that multiheme cytochromes play in the anaerobic metabolism of bacteria:

Exploration of the ‘cytochromome’ of Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, a marine bacterium capable of powering microbial fuel cells
Alexandra S. Alves, Catarina M. Paquete, Bruno M. Fonseca and Ricardo O. Louro
Metallomics, 2011, 3, 349-353
DOI: 10.1039/C0MT00084A

These articles will be free to access for 6 weeks.

Thank you to Norbert and Peter, and to all authors and referees involved in putting this issue together.

We hope you enjoy the themed issue and we look forward to your feedback!

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