Archive for the ‘Covers’ Category

Themed Issue on Plant Metallomics now published

Peroza et al., Metallomics, 2013, 5, 1204-1214

The Themed issue of Metallomics on Plant metallomics has now been published!

Take a look at the Editorial of the issue, written by Guest Editor David Salt. This themed issue contains eight reviews and twelve research papers and provides a good overview of works on genes, small metabolites and proteins involved in the mineral nutrient and trace element homeostasis in plants. Papers highlighting some of the analytical techniques used to make such discoveries are also included.

Hermans et al., Metallomics, 2013, 5, 1170-1183

Below are the HOT articles of the issue, free to read for the next three weeks. To access the full articles, just click on the links:

An update on magnesium homeostasis mechanisms in plants
Christian Hermans, Simon J. Conn, Jiugeng Chen, Qiying Xiao and Nathalie Verbruggen
Metallomics, 2013,5, 1170-1183
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT20223B

Transition metals in plant photosynthesis
Inmaculada Yruela 
Metallomics, 2013,5, 1090-1109
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00086A

Model of how plants sense zinc deficiency
Ana G. L. Assunção, Daniel P. Persson, Søren Husted, Jan K. Schjørring, Ross D. Alexander and Mark G. M. Aarts 
Metallomics, 2013,5, 1110-1116
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00070B

Leszczyszyn et al., Metallomics, 2013, 5, 1146-1169

Diversity and distribution of plant metallothioneins: a review of structure, properties and functions
Oksana I. Leszczyszyn, Hasan T. Imam and Claudia A. Blindauer
Metallomics, 2013,5, 1146-1169
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00072A

Metal ion release from metallothioneins: proteolysis as an alternative to oxidation
Estevão A. Peroza, Augusto dos Santos Cabral, Xiaoqiong Wan and Eva Freisinger
Metallomics, 2013,5, 1204-1214
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00079F

Speciation and identification of tellurium-containing metabolites in garlic, Allium sativum
Yasumi Anan, Miyuki Yoshida, Saki Hasegawa, Ryota Katai, Maki Tokumoto, Laurent Ouerdane, Ryszard Łobińskib and Yasumitsu Ogra  
Metallomics, 2013,5, 1215-1224
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00108C

Zinc export results in adaptive zinc tolerance in the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Suillus bovinus
Joske Ruytinx, Hoai Nguyen, May Van Hees, Michiel Op De Beeck, Jaco Vangronsveld, Robert Carleer, Jan V. Colpaert and Kristin Adriaensen
Metallomics, 2013,5, 1225-1233
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00061C

Comparison of global responses to mild deficiency and excess copper levels in Arabidopsis seedlings
Nuria Andrés-Colás, Ana Perea-García, Sonia Mayo de Andrés, Antoni Garcia-Molina, Eavan Dorcey, Susana Rodríguez-Navarro, Miguel A. Pérez-Amador, Sergi Puig and Lola Peñarrubia 
Metallomics, 2013,5, 1234-1246
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00025G

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Metallomics Issue 5 out now- Metallomics in Japan

Synthesis of antitumor azolato-bridged dinuclear platinum(II) complexes with in vivo antitumor efficacy and unique in vitro cytotoxicity profiles

Metallomics, 2013, 5, 461-468

This month’s latest issue of Metallomics is devoted to the exciting and fascinating work of this field coming from Japan. Originating from the 3rd Metallomics Research Forum in Japan held on August 30 and 31, 2012 in Showa Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo, this themed issue is Guest Edited by Yasumitsu Ogra and Seiichiro Himeno. You can read their Editorial by clicking on the link below. We hope you enjoy the issue.

Metallomics in Japan
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 415-416
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT90014B

Our wonderfully colourful outside front cover is from Seiji Komeda from Suzuka University of Medical Science, who with colleagues have been working with platinum complexes and looking at their antitumor properties.

A coupling system of capillary gel electrophoresis with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for the determination of double stranded DNA fragments

Metallomics, 2013, 5, 424-428

Synthesis of antitumor azolato-bridged dinuclear platinum(II) complexes with in vivo antitumor efficacy and unique in vitro cytotoxicity profiles
Seiji Komeda, Hiroshi Takayama, Toshihiro Suzuki, Akira Odani, Takao Yamori and Masahiko Chikuma
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 461-468
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00040K

On the inside front cover is work looking at DNA fragments by coupling capillary gel electrophoresis with ICP-MS. Shin-ichiro Fujii from AIST and co-workers were able to successfully separate and analyse fragments of double-stranded DNA.

A coupling system of capillary gel electrophoresis with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for the determination of double stranded DNA fragments
Shin-ichiro Fujii, Kazumi Inagaki, Shin-ichi Miyashita, Keisuke Nagasawa, Koichi Chiba and Akiko Takatsu
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 424-428
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00057E

Selenium metabolism and excretion in mice after injection of 82Se-enriched selenomethionine

Metallomics, 2013, 5, 445-452

On the back cover we showcase research into mammalian metabolism of organic selenium compounds by Naoki Furuta in the Department of Applied Chemistry at Chuo University, Tokyo, Japan and colleagues in the Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, Department of Internal Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Organic selenium compounds in plants and yeasts are effective chemoprotectants in mammalian cancer. In their research they identified selenomethionine pathways by measuring endogenous and exogenous 82Se levels and quantified selenium compounds and selenoproteins in mice liver, kidneys, plasma and urine.

Selenium metabolism and excretion in mice after injection of 82Se-enriched selenomethionine
Yoshinari Suzuki, Yoshiteru Hashiura, Tatsuya Sakai, Takao Yamamoto, Takehisa Matsukawa, Atsuko Shinohara and Naoki Furuta
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 445-452
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT20267D

Along with these new covers, here is a couple of HOT papers free for you until May 20th . To read the full articles, please access the links below:

Evaluation of quantitative probes for weaker Cu(I) binding sites completes a set of four capable of detecting Cu(I) affinities from nanomolar to attomolar
Zhiguang Xiao, Lisa Gottschlich, Renate van der Meulen, Saumya R. Udagedara and   Anthony G. Wedd
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 501-513
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00032J

Suppression of ZIP8 expression is a common feature of cadmium-resistant and manganese-resistant RBL-2H3 cells
Hitomi Fujishiro, Toshinao Ohashi, Miki Takuma and   Seiichiro Himeno  
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 437-444
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00003F

Analysis of animal and plant selenometabolites in roots of a selenium accumulator, Brassica rapa var. peruviridis, by speciation
Yasumitsu Ogra, Ayane Katayama, Yurie Ogihara, Ayako Yawata and   Yasumi Anan 
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 429-436
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20187A

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Metallomics Issue 4 NOW online

Oglesby-Sherrouse and Murphy, Metallomics, 2013,5, 276-286

Welcome to the new Issue of Metallomics devoted to Microbial metallomics, a growing area of research focused on understanding the roles of metals and metallo-biomolecules in simple organisms. We have two great new covers for you to enjoy and the interesting editorial by Partha Basu, Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the Duquesne University and Guest Editor of this issue. Enjoy Issue 4 now!

Our outside front cover shows red and white colonies of Shigella dysenteriae cultured on plate. In their critical review, Amanda Oglesby-Sherrouse and Erin Murphy explain how iron regulated bacterial small RNAs control gene expression and influence bacterial physiology and virulence.

Parey et al., Metallomics, 2013,5, 302-317

Iron-responsive bacterial small RNAs: variations on a theme
Amanda G. Oglesby-Sherrouse and Erin R. Murphy
Metallomics, 2013,5, 276-286
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT20224K

The interesting inside front cover of this issue features the mini review of Peter Kroneck and colleagues at the University of Konstanz, Germany. The team describes how the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus obtains energy by reducing sulfate at high temperature and examine the activity of three key enzymes: ATP sulfurylase, adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase and dissimilatory sulfite reductase.

Conserving energy with sulfate around 100 °C – structure and mechanism of key metal enzymes in hyperthermophilic Archaeoglobus fulgidus
Kristian Parey ,  Günter Fritz ,  Ulrich Ermler and Peter M. H. Kroneck
Metallomics, 2013,5, 302-317
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20225E

Along with the covers of Issue 4, here are some HOT papers free for you to read until April 12th. To access the full articles, please click on the links below.

The molybdoproteome of Starkeya novella – insights into the diversity and functions of molybdenum containing proteins in response to changing growth conditions
Ulrike Kappler and Amanda S. Nouwens
Metallomics, 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20230A

Selenite and tellurite form mixed seleno- and tellurotrisulfides with CstR from Staphylococcus aureus
Justin L. Luebke ,  Randy J. Arnold and David P. Giedroc
Metallomics, 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT20205D

The Porphyromonas gingivalis HmuY haemophore binds gallium(III), zinc(II), cobalt(III), manganese(III), nickel(II), and copper(II) protoporphyrin IX but in a manner different to iron(III) protoporphyrin IX
Halina Wójtowicz ,  Marcin Bielecki ,  Jacek Wojaczyński ,  Mariusz Olczak ,  John W. Smalley and Teresa Olczak
Metallomics, 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT20215A

Co(II)-detection does not follow Kco(II) gradient: channelling in Co(II)-sensing
Carl J. Patterson ,  Rafael Pernil ,  Samantha J. Dainty ,  Buddhapriya Chakrabarti ,  Clare E. Henry ,  Victoria A. Money ,  Andrew W. Foster and Nigel J. Robinson
Metallomics, 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT20241K

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Metallomics Issue 3 now online!

Metallomics Issue 3 is now available online!

We have a new colourful cover for you to discover all about and an interesting Tutorial Review for you to enjoy. There is also a new HOT article on release of zinc from the olfactory bulb with potential influence on the olfactory process. Take a look at Issue 3 NOW!

Our outside front cover showcases work from Jürgen Gailer and colleagues from the University of Calgary, Canada. The researchers investigated the effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) on the metabolism of cis-platin in human plasma and discovered that  NAC does not ameliorate cis-platin toxicity as well as sodium thiosulfate. To do this, they employed size exclusion chromatography coupled on-line to an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission
spectrometer and visualized NAC effects on the metabolism of CP in human plasma obtained from healthy volunteers.

N-Acetyl-L-cysteine modulates the metabolism of cis-platin in human plasma in vitro
Melani Sooriyaarachchi ,  Aru Narendran and Jürgen Gailer
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 197-207
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00012E

Schematic peptide self-aggregation

Take a look at this Tutorial Review by Peter Faller and his group from the University of Toulouse. The team carefully explores the mechanisms of peptide self-aggregation and formation of amyloids with particular focus on the role of metals in these processes.  

The role of metal ions in amyloid formation: general principles from model peptides
Bruno Alies ,  Christelle Hureau and Peter Faller
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 183-192
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT20219D

Finally, here is our selected HOT article for you to read:

Zinc released from olfactory bulb glomeruli by patterned electrical stimulation of the olfactory nerve
Laura J. Blakemore ,  Elisa Tomat ,  Stephen J. Lippard and Paul Q. Trombley
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 208-213
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT20158A

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Metallomics Issue 2 NOW online!

Accumulation of Zn and Co in lung cells

The second issue of Metallomics is finally online with two new covers for you to enjoy.

On the outside front cover, images showcase a study from France by Carole Bresson and her group. The team underlines the toxicity of cobalt chloride determining its speciation and cytotoxicity. Herein, they observe accumulation of cobalt and zinc in pulmonary cells by using direct in situ micro-chemical analysis based on ion micro-beam techniques and describe the synergistic toxicity of combined cobalt and zinc exposure in human cells.

Cobalt chloride speciation, mechanisms of cytotoxicity on human pulmonary cells, and synergistic toxicity with zinc
Carole Bresson ,  Carine Darolles ,  Asuncion Carmona ,  Céline Gautier ,  Nicole Sage ,  Stéphane Roudeau ,  Richard Ortega ,  Eric Ansoborlo and Véronique Malard
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 133-143
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT20196A

Effect of MPTP on metal concentration

Our inside front cover features an interesting review written by Dominc James Hare and colleagues from the University of Technology, Sydney. The authors examine the unbalanced metal concentration observed during Parkinson’s disease. In addition, they analyse how cellular metabolism is altered following release of MPTP, a potent toxin that selectively destroys dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The use of MPTP as a model for Parkinson’s disease is also discussed.

Metallobiology of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine neurotoxicity
Dominic J. Hare ,  Paul A. Adlard ,  Philip A. Doble and David I. Finkelstein
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 91-109
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20164J

Alog with our new covers, here are two selected HOT papers for you free to read until February 18thFiona Larner examines copper metabolism during Parkinson’s disease and Jose Arguello analyses copper transport during infection with Pseudomonas. To know more about these studies, please access the full articles by clicking the links below:

High precision isotope measurements reveal poor control of copper metabolism in Parkinsonism
F. Larner ,  B. Sampson ,  M. Rehkämper ,  D. J. Weiss ,  J. R. Dainty ,  S. O’Riordan ,  T. Panetta and P. G. Bain
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 125-132
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT20238K

Periplasmic response upon disruption of transmembrane Cu transport in Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Daniel Raimunda ,  Teresita Padilla-Benavides ,  Stefan Vogt ,  Sylvain Boutigny ,  Kaleigh N. Tomkinson ,  Lydia A. Finney and José M. Argüello
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 144-151
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20191G

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Metallomics Issue 1 NOW online!

The end of the year is just the right time for us to enjoy the Issue 1 of Metallomics!

Artistic design by Heidi Cartwright from an original photograph of the human choroid plexus by Katherine Davies

We have four beautiful covers featuring outstanding research coming from all over the world. Our original outside front cover shows the work of Kay Double from Australia, who studied copper regulation in the human brain. Copper and copper transporters were localised in the brain by using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. This work provides new insights into the mechanisms by which copper levels are altered in the brain leading to neurological diseases.

Localization of copper and copper transporters in the human brain
Katherine M. Davies ,  Dominic J. Hare ,  Veronica Cottam ,  Nicholas Chen ,  Leon Hilgers ,  Glenda Halliday ,  Julian F. B. Mercer and Kay L. Double
Metallomics, 2013,5, 43-51
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20151H

Images of dividing cells

This bright and colorful inside front cover gives us a snapshot of a study from the Georgia Institute of Technology, USA. Christoph Fahrni and co-workers examined the distribution of trace metals such as metal, zinc and iron in mouse fibroblast cells during cell division. Using X-ray fluorescence microscopy, they suggest the mechanisms of inheritance of these metals.

Selenium and sulphur in sunflower leaves by LA-ICP-MS

Subcellular redistribution and mitotic inheritance of transition metals in proliferating mouse fibroblast cells
Reagan McRae ,  Barry Lai and Christoph J. Fahrni
Metallomics, 2013,5, 52-61
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20176C

Coming from South America is the work of Marco Aurelio Zezzi Arruda, represented in our inside back cover. His team developed a qualitative and quantitative method to map selenium and sulphur in sunflower leaves, using the recently developed laser ablation imaging mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) technique.

Laser ablation (imaging) for mapping and determining Se and S in sunflower leaves
Marcelo Anselmo Oseas da Silva and Marco Aurelio Zezzi Arruda
Metallomics, 2013,5, 62-67
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20154B

Finally, our cheerful outside back cover features a minireview from Atlanta, USA, written by Jenny Yang and colleagues. The authors explain the concept of “Calciomics”, outlining the most recent approaches used to identify calcium-binding proteins and to understand how they interact with their targets.

Calcium binding proteins in biological systems

Calciomics: integrative studies of Ca2+-binding proteins and their interactomes in biological systems
Yubin Zhou ,  Shenghui Xue and Jenny J. Yang
Metallomics, 2013,5, 29-42
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20009K

 
Along with these new covers, Issue 1 presents a couple of HOT papers for you free to read until January 10th. Take a look now by accessing the links below. And don’t forget to check out our Editorial on the recent successes of Metallomics.

Molecular strategies of microbial iron assimilation: from high-affinity complexes to cofactor assembly systems
Marcus Miethke
Metallomics, 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20193C

Pseudomonas putida KT2440 response to nickel or cobalt induced stress by quantitative proteomics
Prasun Ray ,  Vincent Girard ,  Manon Gault ,  Claudette Job ,  Marc Bonneu ,  Marie-Andrée Mandrand-Berthelot ,  Surya S. Singh ,  Dominique Job and Agnès Rodrigue
Metallomics, 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20147J

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Metallomics Issue 12 now online

Reference measurement procedures for the iron saturation in human transferrin based on IDMS and Raman scattering

Zakel et al., Metallomics, 2012, 4, 1239

For this last issue of 2012 we have two lovely covers for you to enjoy. The colourful front cover comes from Sabine Zakel and colleagues at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in Germany. They have been studying the iron status in human serum, as this is an important diagnostic marker for a number of conditions such as anemia and hemochromatosis.

Reference measurement procedures for the iron saturation in human transferrin based on IDMS and Raman scattering
Claudia Frank, Olaf Rienitz, Reinhard Jährling, Detlef Schiel and Sabine Zakel
Metallomics, 2012, 4, 1239-1244
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20183F

Concentration of various trace elements in the rat retina and their distribution in different structures

Ugarte et al., Metallomics, 2012, 4, 1245

On the inside front cover we have an image from Marta Ugarte from University of Manchester and Manchester Royal Eye Hospital. With a team from across the UK and Spain they have been looking at trace elements in the retina of rats and the varying distributions of the elements in different parts of the retina.

Concentration of various trace elements in the rat retina and their distribution in different structures
Marta Ugarte, Geoffrey W. Grime, Gillian Lord, Kalotina Geraki, Joanna F. Collingwood, Mary E. Finnegan, Hannah Farnfield, Michael Merchant, Melanie J. Bailey, Neil I. Ward, Peter J. Foster, Paul N. Bishop and Neville N. Osborne
Metallomics, 2012, 4, 1245-1254
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20157G

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Metallomics Issue 11 now online

We have a bumper four covers for this month’s issue of Metallomics!

Outside front cover, Metallomics, Issue 11, 2012

Hutcheson & Broderick, Metallomics, 2012, 4, 1149

On the outside front cover comes an informative image from Rachel U. Hutcheson and Joan B. Broderick, Montana State University, and their minireview on radical SAM enzymes in methylation and methylthiolation. They present recent highlights in the understanding of radical SAM enzymes.

Radical SAM enzymes in methylation and methylthiolation
Rachel U. Hutcheson and Joan B. Broderick
Metallomics, 2012, 4, 1149-1154
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20136D

Inside front cover, Metallomics, Issue 11, 2012

Matzanke, Carrano et al., Metallomics, 2012, 4, 1160

On the inside front cover we have a beautiful image from Berthold F. Matzanke and Carl J. Carrano, University of Lubeck and San Diego State University, respectively, who have been looking at iron transport and storage in marine plant-like organisms.

Iron transport and storage in the coccolithophore: Emiliania huxleyi
Andrej Hartnett, Lars H. Böttger, Berthold F. Matzanke and Carl J. Carrano
Metallomics, 2012, 4, 1160-1166
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20144E

Inside back cover, Metallomics, Issue 11, 2012

Broberg et al., Metallomics, 2012, 4, 1167

On the inside back cover we showcase work by Karin Broberg in the Department of Laboratory Medicine at Lund University, Sweden and colleagues at the Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm and the Department of Risk Benefit Assessment, Uppsala, Sweden, and the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh. They have been looking at environmental arsenic exposure and DNA methylation of the tumour suppressor gene p16 and the DNA repair gene MLH1.

Environmental arsenic exposure and DNA methylation of the tumor suppressor gene p16 and the DNA repair gene MLH1: effect of arsenic metabolism and genotype
Mohammad Bakhtiar Hossain, Marie Vahter, Gabriela Concha and Karin Broberg
Metallomics, 2012, 4, 1167-1175
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20120H

Outside back cover, Metallomics, Issue 11, 2012

Koellensperger et al., Metallomics, 2012, 4, 1176

And finally, on the outside back cover we find research into selenium enriched yeast products by Gunda Koellensperger at the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria and colleagues at the BIOMIN Research Center in Tulln, Austria.

Monitoring the production process of selenized yeast by elemental speciation analysis
Evelyn Rampler, Stephan Rose, Dominik Wieder, Anja Ganner, Ilse Dohnal, Thomas Dalik, Stephan Hann and Gunda Koellensperger
Metallomics, 2012, 4, 1176-1184
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20138K

All of these cover articles will be free to read for 6 weeks.

http://ki.se/?l=en
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Issue 10 online

Metallomics, 2012, Vol. 4, Issue 10, front cover

Front cover: Aitken et al., Metallomics, 2012, 4, 1051-1056

There are two colourful covers on the latest issue of Metallomics, highlighting the imaging of ruthenium in cells and the prediction of crosslinked protein cofactors.

On the front cover, Hugh Harris of the University of Adelaide, Australia, and his international collaborators use X-ray fluorescence imaging at two incident energies was used to reveal the intracellular distribution of ruthenium in single human cells.

They show that synchrotron-based XRF is capable of detecting intracellular ruthenium and can provide valuable insight into the metabolic pathway of ruthenium-based drugs.

Distinct cellular fates for KP1019 and NAMI-A determined by X-ray fluorescence imaging of single cells
Jade B. Aitken, Sumy Antony, Claire M. Weekley, Barry Lai, Leone Spiccia and Hugh H. Harris
Metallomics
, 2012, 4, 1051-1056
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20072D

On the inside front cover, David Benson from Calvin College, USA, and co-workers present a chemical bioinformatics method for the prediction of undiscovered crosslinked protein cofactors.

Metallomics, 2012, Vol. 4, Issue 10, inside front cover

Inside front cover: Martinie et al., Metallomics, 2012, 4, 1037-1042

The authors say their approach provides the first step in developing high throughput methods for the discovery of proteins that form crosslinked protein cofactors in vivo.

Identifying proteins that can form tyrosine-cysteine crosslinks
Ryan J. Martinie, Pahan I. Godakumbura, Elizabeth G. Porter, Anand Divakaran, Brandon J. Burkhart, John T. Wertz and David E. Benson
Metallomics
, 2012, 4, 1037-1042
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20093G

Both these cover article will be free to access for 6 weeks, and don’t forget to take a look at the other highlights from this issue, including HOT articles and an Editorial from the new Chair of our Editorial Board.

Follow Metallomics on Twitter: @metallomics

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Metallomics Issue 9 now online

Grasso et al., Metallomics, 2012, 4, 937

This months issue of Metallomics features papers from our Emerging Investigators themed issue and has three wonderful covers for you to enjoy.

On the front is a striking image from Giuseppe Grasso, Maria Laura Giuffrida and Enrico Rizzarelli who have written a critical review on the three main different pathways by which metal ions can affect the proteolytic enzymes responsible for Aβ peptides degradation.

Metallostasis and amyloid β-degrading enzymes
Giuseppe Grasso, Maria Laura Giuffrida and Enrico Rizzarelli
Metallomics, 2012, 4, 937-949
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20105D

Lim & Storr et al, Metallomics, 2012, 4, 910

On the inside front cover we have an image from Emerging Investigators Mi Hee Lim and Tim Storr from the University of Michigan and the Simon Fraser University, respectively, who have been studying neurodegenerative diseases and metal-induced amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation. Together with colleagues from the US and Canada, they have been looking at dual-function triazole–pyridine derivatives that can act as inhibitors to this Aβ aggregation.

Dual-function triazole–pyridine derivatives as inhibitors of metal-induced amyloid-β aggregation
Michael R. Jones, Erin L. Service, John R. Thompson, Michael C. P. Wang, Isaac J. Kimsey, Alaina S. DeToma, Ayyalusamy Ramamoorthy, Mi Hee Lim and Tim Storr
Metallomics, 2012, 4, 910-920
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20113E

Finney et al., Metallomics, 2012, 4, 921

We also have a lovely back cover this month. Showcasing research by Emerging Investigator Lydia Finney into the role of metals and metalloproteins in biological systems at the X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, USA.

Identifying metalloproteins through X-ray fluorescence mapping and mass spectrometry
Daniel Raimunda, Tripti Khare, Carol Giometti, Stefan Vogt, José M. Argüello and Lydia Finney
Metallomics, 2012, 4, 921-927
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20095C

All of these papers will be free to access for 6 weeks, so click through and take a look!

You also might like to take a look at our Emerging Investigators themed issue and read about some of the hottest new research in the field.

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