Archive for the ‘Board News’ Category

Introducing the newest members of the Metallomics Advisory Board

We are delighted to introduce you to the four newest members of the Metallomics Advisory Board. 


Sharon La Fontaine 
Deakin University, Australia
Dominic Hare 
The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Australia
Christian Hartinger
The University of Auckland, New Zealand
Elizabeth New 
The University of Sydney, Australia


All four members have recently been appointed to the Advisory Board and we welcome the knowledge and expertise they will bring to the journal. We very much look forward to working with them. Welcome to the Metallomics team!

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In memory of Joe Caruso

Gary Hieftje, Joe Caruso, Maria Montes-Bayon

We are honoured to announce the publication of an online web collection with JAAS and Metallomics dedicated to the memory of Joe Caruso.

Joe was a well-known and highly respected leader in the field of analytical chemistry and plasma spectrochemistry in particular – more recently he made great contributions to the fields of elemental speciation and metallomics. Over the years he had been very active for the Royal Society of Chemistry and as well as serving as Chair for JAAS, he was the founding Chair for Metallomics, and became one of the leaders in this emerging area of exciting research.

This very special compilation highlights analytical research being conducted in these areas. We believe that this collection of papers is a fitting memorial to an inspiring mentor and outstanding chemist.

You can access the collection here, or use the link http://rsc.li/2tHpEQl

We thank the guest editors Gary Hieftje and Maria Montes-Bayon, and those who were able to contribute to the collection for their support of this very special memorial.

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Introducing new Metallomics Editorial Board member Professor Katherine Franz

We are delighted to announce the appointment of Professor Katherine Franz as a member of the Metallomics Editorial Board.


Professor Katherine Franz, previously a member of the Metallomics Advisory Board, is a professor in the Department of Chemistry at Duke University, USA. Research in the Franz Group is involved in elucidating the structural and functional consequences of metal ion coordination in biological systems. Professor Franz is particularly interested in understanding the coordination chemistry utilized by biology to manage essential yet toxic species like copper and iron. Understanding these principles further guides the development of new chemical tools to manipulate biological metal ion location, speciation, and reactivity for potential therapeutic benefit.


We welcome Professor Franz and her expertise and experience to the Metallomics Editorial Board. This appointment stengthens the Board and we look forward to working with Professor Franz going forward.

You can keep up to date with the latest developments from Metallomics by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

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New Editorial Board Chair for Metallomics: David Giedroc

After four fantastic years, Wolfgang Maret, Chair of Metallomics, is coming to the end of his term. Wolfgang took over the role in 2012, over which period he has helped the Royal Society of Chemistry with numerous activities, such as guest editing the 2014 Zinc in the Biosciences themed issue, chairing four Editorial Board meetings (including two Editors’ Symposia in Brussels and London) and supporting the journal at numerous conferences and events, particularly within the zinc community.  We wish him all the best for the future and value his continued contribution to the journal as an Advisory Board member.

David Giedroc, new Chair of the Metallomics Editorial Board

We are pleased to announce that the new Chair of the Editorial Board for Metallomics is David Giedroc, Indiana University, USA. Professor Giedroc’s research interests fall under a common umbrella coined the biophysical chemistry of infectious disease.  He has long-standing interests in transition metal homeostasis and more recent interests in hydrogen sulfidesensing and reactive sulfur species in major nosocomial bacterial pathogens and seeks a molecular-level understanding of macromolecular structure, dynamics and regulation, and uses the tools of biophysical chemistry, bioinorganic chemistry, proteomic profiling and NMR structure determination.

As an already experienced member of the journal’s Editorial Board, David is more than qualified to take the reins from Wolfgang, and we are looking forward to his term as Chair of Metallomics.

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Editor’s Choice: Rachel Austin selects her top Metallomics papers

Metallomics Editorial Board Member, Professor Rachel Austin (Barnard College, Columbia University) selects her Top 5 articles from recent issues of Metallomics.Professor Rachel Austin, Metallomics Editorial Board Member, selects her favourite papers from recent issues of Metallomics

Rachel is a bioinorganic chemist and her laboratory has a longstanding interest in understanding the mechanisms of metalloenzymes, especially those important in the global cycling of elements.

Below, see what Rachel says about each of the articles she has selected – all articles are free to access for the next 4 weeks!*

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Loss of pdr-1/parkin influences Mn homeostasis through altered ferroportin expression in C. elegans
Michael Aschner et. al., Metallomics, 2015, 7, 847–856, DOI: 10.1039/C5MT00052A

An interesting hypothesis, namely that increased Mn accumulation in worms lacking pdr-1, a parkin homolog, is due to changes in Mn transport was tested in this paper. The authors found evidence that Mn export is reduced in worms without pdr-1, consistent with the idea that metal ion imbalance is connected to Parkinsonism.

Synthesis of nickel–iron hydrogenase in Cupriavidus metallidurans is controlled by metal-dependent silencing and un-silencing of genomic islands
Dietrich H. Nies et. al., Metallomics, 2015, 7, 632–649, DOI: 10.1039/C4MT00297K

This paper presents a series of complementary experiments highlighting connections between zinc homeostasis and the expression of nickel-dependent proteins.

Back to the metal age: battle for metals at the host–pathogen interface during urinary tract infection
Harry L. T. Mobley et. al., Metallomics, 2015, 7, 935–942, DOI: 10.1039/C4MT00329B

Any bioinorganic chemist who has ever watched the havoc UTIs cause in the elderly will find this summary of metal-dependent host-pathogen interactions a very satisfying article to read.

Proteomic analysis of the copper resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae
Xuesong Sun et. al., Metallomics, 2015, 7, 448–454, DOI: 10.1039/C4MT00276H

Two dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry and quantitative reverse transcription PCR point to the importance of cell wall biosynthesis in the defense response of Streptococcus pneumonia to elevated levels of copper.

Understanding metal homeostasis in primary cultured neurons. Studies using single neuron subcellular and quantitative metallomics
Robert A. Colvin et. al., Metallomics, 2015, 7, 1111–1123, DOI: 10.1039/C5MT00084J

A beautiful paper highlighting the power of synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) to provide quantitative information about the metal distribution within a single cell and to compliment knowledge about in vivo metal ion localization gleaned from other types of measurements

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Metallomics: whence and whither

Ever wondered what the field of metallomics is all about? How did it develop and why is it such an exciting area of research?

The new Editorial Board Chair of Metallomics, Wolfgang Maret of King’s College London, has written a brilliant and informative editorial about the field in general. It covers the birth of metallomics, its growth into a number different disciplines and where our journal Metallomics fits in. Click through below to read more.

Metallomics: whence and whither
Wolfgang Maret
Metallomics, 2012, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT90041F

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New Editorial Board Chair for Metallomics: Wolfgang Maret

New Editorial Board Chair for Metallomics: Wolfgang Maret

After four fantastic years, our inaugural Chair for Metallomics, Joe Caruso, is coming to the end of his term. We would like to take this opportunity to thank Joe for all of his hard work and dedication to the journal and look forward to his continued contributions as an Advisory Board member. We wish him all the very best for the future.

We are pleased to announce that the new Chair of the Editorial Board for Metallomics is Wolfgang Maret, from King’s College London, UK. Wolfgang’s main research interests include molecular and cellular mechanisms of metal homeostasis, the role of micronutrients in normal physiology and pathophysiology, sulfur and selenium redox biochemistry, as well as the structure and function of metalloenzymes.

“I am looking forward to the challenge of building on the excellent tradition and success of my predecessor” commented Wolfgang, “and the most important asset will be the RSC editorial office, the boards, and the input of the community at large”.

As an already experienced member of the journal’s Advisory Board, Wolfgang is more than qualified to take up the reigns from Joe, and we are looking forward to his term as Chair.

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Issue 3: papers from Metallomics Board members

Chair of Metallomics' Editorial Board, Prof. Joe Caruso

Professor Joe Caruso, Chair of the Metallomics Editorial Board

We have a selection of papers in Issue 3 from our Editorial and Advisory Board members – enjoy!

Editorial Board Chair Professor Joe Caruso
Exploring the structural basis for selenium/mercury antagonism in Allium fistulosum
David H. McNear, Scott E. Afton and Joseph A. Caruso
Metallomics, 2012, 4, 267-276
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT00158F

See which other Board members feature in the latest issue

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C&EN highlights the importance of metallomics research

MetalloproteinC&EN recently highlighted the importance of the metalloproteome and how it is being studied.  Not surprisingly, several Metallomics articles and Editorial Board members featured in the article.

“Merging Metals Into Proteomics” can be viewed online here, and includes comments from Board member David Koppenaal.

The four Metallomics papers below are referred to in the article, and you can read them for free until 20 January: our New Year gift to you!

We continue to publish the best in research related to metals and metalloids in biological, clinical and environmental systems, so why not submit your latest work to us and contribute to a growing and vital field.

Probing the viral metallome: searching for metalloproteins in bacteriophage λ – the hunt begins
Yaofang Zhang, Richard Thompson and Joseph Caruso
Metallomics, 2011, 3, 472-481
DOI: 10.1039/C0MT00104J

Metallomics study in CSF for putative biomarkers to predict cerebral vasospasm
Yaofang Zhang, Joseph F. Clark, Gail Pyne-Geithman and Joseph Caruso
Metallomics, 2010, 2, 628-637
DOI: 10.1039/C0MT00005A

Combined application of a laser ablation-ICP-MS assay for screening and ESI-FTICR-MS for identification of a Cd-binding protein in Spinacia oleracea L. after exposure to Cd
Aleksandra Polatajko, Ingo Feldmann, Heiko Hayen and Norbert Jakubowski
Metallomics, 2011, 3, 1001-1008
DOI: 10.1039/C1MT00051A

Exploring the microbial metalloproteome using MIRAGE
Ana-Maria Sevcenco, Martijn W. H. Pinkse, Hubert Th. Wolterbeek, Peter D. E. M. Verhaert, Wilfred R. Hagen and Peter-Leon Hagedoorn
Metallomics, 2011, 3, 1324-1330
DOI: 10.1039/C1MT00154J

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High-profile paper for Metallomics Board members

Editorial Board member Professor Nigel Robinson of the Durham University, UK, and Advisory Board member Professor Ivano Bertini of the University of Florence, Italy, are authors of a recent paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Copper metallochaperones supply copper to cupro-proteins through copper-mediated protein-protein-interactions and it has been hypothesized that metallochaperones thereby inhibit copper from causing damage en route.   In their paper, Nigel, Ivano and colleagues present evidence in support of this latter role for the cyanobacterial metallochaperone, Atx1.

Cyanobacterial metallochaperone inhibits deleterious side reactions of copper
Steve Tottey, Carl J. Patterson, Lucia Banci, Ivano Bertini, Isabella C. Felli, Anna Pavelkova, Samantha J. Dainty, Rafael Pernil, Kevin J. Waldron, Andrew W. Foster, and Nigel J. Robinson
PNAS, 2012, Early Edition
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1117515109

You may also be interested in these papers:

Copper proteomes, phylogenetics and evolution
Leonardo Decaria, Ivano Bertini and Robert J. P. Williams
Metallomics, 2011, 3, 56-60
DOI: 10.1039/C0MT00045K

Roles of copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase 1 and metallothionein in copper homeostasis
Takamitsu Miyayama, Yudai Ishizuka, Tomomi Iijima, Daisuke Hiraoka and Yasumitsu Ogra
Metallomics, 2011, 3, 693-701
DOI: 10.1039/C1MT00016K

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