Author Archive

Trace elements in sulfidic waters

Structures of Fe-Mo-S complexes

In aquatic ecosystems, nutrients in the form of trace elements such as iron, molybdenum and copper play fundamental roles in important biological processes including nitrogen fixation, nitrate assimilation and N2O decomposition.
In oxygen bearing water these trace elements are predominantly found in their highest oxidation states in the form of environmentally mobile (hydr)oxyanions. In sulfide bearing waters with poor ventilation, (hydr)oxyanions are no longer stable and are either reduced rapidly by sulfide or transformed to thioanions without reduction.

In this hot article by George Helz from the University of Maryland and colleagues at the Minnesota State University address the mechanisms which prevented the trace elements nutrients being lost from marine environments as insoluble sulfides, during times when large parts the Earth’s oceans were sulfidic.

To read the full article, please access the link below. This paper will be free to read until 17 December 2013.

Stabilities of thiomolybdate complexes of iron; implications for retention of essential trace elements (Fe, Cu, Mo) in sulfidic waters
George R. Helz, Britt E. Ericksona and Trent P. Vorlicek
Metallomics, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00217A

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Importance of conserved residue in human copper chaperone

Understanding copper-binding properties

Copper is one of the most abundant metals in the human body and it takes part in a number of biological processes. Because both copper deficiency and excess can cause serious health problems, copper homeostasis is tightly regulated. Therefore, monitoring the use and transfer of copper in the human body is of great interest to scientists.

To understand how copper is transported into the cells, Changlin Tian and Yangzhong Liu at the University of Science and Technology of China investigated a mutation of copper chaperone Atox1 which affects the conserved residue Lys60. Lys60 plays an important role in the formation of protein heterodimers and determines the copper transfer to the target protein. In their study, the researchers used NMR and protein dynamic studies and indicated that the mutation causes crucial structural changes that affect the metal-binding centres and the protein flexibility. These results indicate that the residue Lys60 preserves the structure and dynamics of Atox1 and thus the protein’s ability to bind copper and deliver it to the target protein.

To know more about this work, please access the link below. This paper will be free to read until November 15th .

Conserved residue modulates copper-binding properties through structural dynamics in human copper chaperone Atox1
Zhaoyong Xi, Chaowei Shi, Changlin Tian and   Yangzhong Liu
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 1566-1573
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00190C

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Themed Issue on Zinc in the Biosciences: Submissions Open!

We are pleased to announce a new themed issue of Metallomics on Zinc in the Biosciences

Submission Deadline: 28th Feb, 2014

Zinc has a wide number of roles in biology, which is certainly reflected in the content we regularly publish in Metallomics. The aim of this themed issue is to bring together all recent activities in the field and highlight fundamental work and new developments in the emerging areas of research on the role of zinc in the biosciences.

If you work in the area of zinc biology and biochemistry, why not submit your next paper to Metallomics?

All articles will be peer-reviewed and, to be suitable for publication, must meet the usual quality and significance standards of the journal. Please indicate in your covering letter that your article is to be considered for the Zinc in the Biosciences themed issue.

Email us at METALLOMICS-RSC@rsc.org for more information.

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Themed Issue on Plant Metallomics now published

Peroza et al., Metallomics, 2013, 5, 1204-1214

The Themed issue of Metallomics on Plant metallomics has now been published!

Take a look at the Editorial of the issue, written by Guest Editor David Salt. This themed issue contains eight reviews and twelve research papers and provides a good overview of works on genes, small metabolites and proteins involved in the mineral nutrient and trace element homeostasis in plants. Papers highlighting some of the analytical techniques used to make such discoveries are also included.

Hermans et al., Metallomics, 2013, 5, 1170-1183

Below are the HOT articles of the issue, free to read for the next three weeks. To access the full articles, just click on the links:

An update on magnesium homeostasis mechanisms in plants
Christian Hermans, Simon J. Conn, Jiugeng Chen, Qiying Xiao and Nathalie Verbruggen
Metallomics, 2013,5, 1170-1183
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT20223B

Transition metals in plant photosynthesis
Inmaculada Yruela 
Metallomics, 2013,5, 1090-1109
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00086A

Model of how plants sense zinc deficiency
Ana G. L. Assunção, Daniel P. Persson, Søren Husted, Jan K. Schjørring, Ross D. Alexander and Mark G. M. Aarts 
Metallomics, 2013,5, 1110-1116
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00070B

Leszczyszyn et al., Metallomics, 2013, 5, 1146-1169

Diversity and distribution of plant metallothioneins: a review of structure, properties and functions
Oksana I. Leszczyszyn, Hasan T. Imam and Claudia A. Blindauer
Metallomics, 2013,5, 1146-1169
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00072A

Metal ion release from metallothioneins: proteolysis as an alternative to oxidation
Estevão A. Peroza, Augusto dos Santos Cabral, Xiaoqiong Wan and Eva Freisinger
Metallomics, 2013,5, 1204-1214
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00079F

Speciation and identification of tellurium-containing metabolites in garlic, Allium sativum
Yasumi Anan, Miyuki Yoshida, Saki Hasegawa, Ryota Katai, Maki Tokumoto, Laurent Ouerdane, Ryszard Łobińskib and Yasumitsu Ogra  
Metallomics, 2013,5, 1215-1224
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00108C

Zinc export results in adaptive zinc tolerance in the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Suillus bovinus
Joske Ruytinx, Hoai Nguyen, May Van Hees, Michiel Op De Beeck, Jaco Vangronsveld, Robert Carleer, Jan V. Colpaert and Kristin Adriaensen
Metallomics, 2013,5, 1225-1233
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00061C

Comparison of global responses to mild deficiency and excess copper levels in Arabidopsis seedlings
Nuria Andrés-Colás, Ana Perea-García, Sonia Mayo de Andrés, Antoni Garcia-Molina, Eavan Dorcey, Susana Rodríguez-Navarro, Miguel A. Pérez-Amador, Sergi Puig and Lola Peñarrubia 
Metallomics, 2013,5, 1234-1246
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00025G

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HOT Articles in Metallomics

These articles will be free for you for the next three weeks. Click on the links below!

Novel surface associated polyphosphate bodies sequester uranium in the filamentous, marine cyanobacterium, Anabaena torulosa
Celin Acharya and   Shree Kumar Apte
Metallomics, 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00139C

Synthesis of [PtCl2(4,4′-dialkoxy-2,2′-bipyridine)] complexes and their in vitro anticancer properties
Van Vo, Ontida Tanthmanatham, Haesook Han, Pradip K. Bhowmik and Bryan L. Spangelo
Metallomics, 2013,5, 973-987
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00128H

The role of metal binding and phosphorylation domains in the regulation of cisplatin-induced trafficking of ATP7B
Roohangiz Safaei, Preston L. Adams, Ryan A. Mathews, Gerald Manorek and Stephen B. Howell 
Metallomics, 2013,5, 964-972
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00131H

Model of how plants sense zinc deficiency
Ana G. L. Assunção, Daniel P. Persson, Søren Husted, Jan K. Schjørring, Ross D. Alexander and Mark G. M. Aarts 
Metallomics, 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00070B

Metal ion release from metallothioneins: proteolysis as an alternative to oxidation
Estevão A. Peroza, Augusto dos Santos Cabral, Xiaoqiong Wan and Eva Freisinger
Metallomics, 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00079F

Metallomics for drug development: an integrated CE-ICP-MS and ICP-MS approach reveals the speciation changes for an investigational ruthenium(III) drug bound to holo-transferrin in simulated cancer cytosol
Svetlana S. Aleksenko, Magdalena Matczuk, Xifeng Lu, Lidia S. Foteeva, Katarzyna Pawlak, Andrei R. Timerbaev and Maciej Jarosz
Metallomics, 2013,5, 955-963
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00092C

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Free to access Cancer Nanotechnology collection 2013

We are pleased to present a new Web Collection of articles from publications across the RSC journal portfolio demonstrating the use of (nano)technology in the diagnosis, imaging and treatment of cancer.

This web collection will be free to access until July 28th, so register for an RSC Publishing personal account and read this cutting edge research for free this week!

Here are just a few of the cancer nanotechnology articles:

Visualising gold inside tumour cells following treatment with an antitumour gold(I) complex
Louise E. Wedlock, Matt R. Kilburn, John B. Cliff, Luis Filgueira, Martin Saunders and   Susan J. Berners-Price
Metallomics, 2011,3, 917-925
DOI: 10.1039/C1MT00053E

Magnetic quantitative immunoanalysis of carcinoembryonic antigen by ICP-MS with mercury labels
Hanyong Peng, Beibei Chen, Man He, Yuan Zhang and   Bin Hu
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2011,26, 1217-1223
DOI: 10.1039/C1JA00007A

Magnetic beads-based electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for determination of cancer markers using quantum dot functionalized PtRu alloys as labels
Yan Zhang, Shenguang Ge, Shaowei Wang, Mei Yan, Jinghua Yu, Xianrang Song and   Weiyan Liu
Analyst, 2012,137, 2176-2182
DOI: 10.1039/C2AN16170B

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HOT Articles in Metallomics!

Take a look at our selected HOT Articles just published in Metallomics! They are all free for you to read until July 15th. Have a read now!

Association of arsenic with nutrient elements in rice plants
Guilan Duan, Wenju Liu, Xueping Chen, Ying Hu and   Yongguan Zhu  
Metallomics, 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT20277A

Transition metals in plant photosynthesis
Inmaculada Yruela
Metallomics, 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00086A

Characterization of mercury-containing protein in human plasma
Zhaojun Yun, Lu Li, Lihong Liu, Bin He, Xingchen Zhao and   Guibin Jiang  
Metallomics, 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00036B

Interaction of cisplatin and analogue Pt(en)Cl2 with the copper metallo-chaperone Atox1
Chak Ming Sze, Zhenyu Shi, George N. Khairallah, Linda Feketeová, Richard A. J. O’Hair, Zhiguang Xiao, Paul S. Donnelly and   Anthony G. Wedd
Metallomics, 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00082F

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Exploring the Activity of Metallo-drugs

Measuring anticancer activity in vitro

New compounds based on silver and palladium have been recently developed and tested in vitro for anticancer and antibacterial activity.

Rosenani Haque and colleagues at the University Sains of Malaysia synthesised Ag(I)– and Pd(II)–N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes derived from imidazole-2-ylidenes and characterised their structures by X-ray diffraction and NMR.
All the compunds showed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli while only one of the trans-Pd(II)–NHC complex displayed significant anticancer activity.

To know more about this study, please access the full article below. This paper will be free to read until June 17th.

Sterically tuned Ag(I)- and Pd(II)-N-heterocyclic carbene complexes of imidazol-2-ylidenes: synthesis, crystal structures, and in vitro antibacterial and anticancer studies
Rosenani A. Haque, Abbas Washeel Salman, Srinivasa Budagumpi, Amirul Al-Ashraf Abdullah and   Amin M. S. Abdul Majid 
Metallomics, 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00051F

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Iron and Manganese in yeast mitochondria

Liquid chromatography (LC)-Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) for metal distribution

Spectroscopic methods can be used to evaluate distribution of metals in the mitochondria of yeast cells.

Paul Lindahl and colleagues at the Texas A&M University, USA, investigated the function of the Mtm1p, a carrier protein found in the yeast Saccharomyces cervisiae. Deleting the Mtm1p gene, they evaluated the iron and manganese presence in the cells and discovered that iron and manganese accumulate in mitochondria and inactivate the enzyme Mn-superoxide dismutase. Metal concentrations in cells and mitochondria were efficiently measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

To know more about this research, please access the full article below. This paper will be free to read until May 24th.

Insights into the iron-ome and manganese-ome of Δmtm1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria Jinkyu
Park, Sean P. McCormick, Mrinmoy Chakrabarti and   Paul A. Lindahl 
Metallomics, 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00041A

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Metal of The Month: Molybdenum

Molybdenite is the main source of molybdenum

April’s metal of the month is molybdenum, a strong and silvery metal able to withstand extremely high temperatures without changing its shape, expanding or softening significantly.

Molybdenum does not occur as a free metal on Earth but is found in various oxidation states in minerals and is thought to be the 25th most abundant element in the oceans. The main source of this element is the ore molybdenite and most of its production is as a by-product of copper production.

Molybdenum has the symbol Mo and atomic number 42

Currently, the main use of molybdenum is in manufacturing. Due to its relative strength and heat resistance it is also used by both the military and in space exploration. Most of the world production of molybdenum is converted into molybdenum disulfide, a lubricant additive used in aircrafts and space vehicles.

Molybdenum is extremely important for plants and animals and is an essential component of the enzyme nitrogenase which converts the atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia. Leguminous plants use the nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase and molybdenum is found in legumes, lentils and grains.

Molybdenum is found in legumes, lentils and grains

In humans, although toxic in other than small quantities, molybdenum is important for chemical reactions such as processing amino acids and converting purines in uric acid, an antioxidant important to protect cells from oxidative damage. The average human takes in about 0.3 grammes a day and stores about 5 milligrammes in the body.

Molybdenum deficiencies are rare, but some cases of molybdenum cofactor deficiency and deficiency of molybdenum due to total parenteral nutrition (intravenous feeding) have been reported. These types of deficiencies result in high levels of sulfite and urate and can cause neurological damage.

If you want to know more about molybdenum, take a look at the papers below and discover all about the latest molybdenum research. These will be free to read until May 27th.

You can also take a look at the RSC Visual Element Periodic Table, and the Chemistry in its Element podcast.

And if you work in the area of molybdenum biology, we hope you will consider submitting your next paper to Metallomics.

Molybdenum disulfide is used as a lubricant for space vehicles

The molybdoproteome of Starkeya novella – insights into the diversity and functions of molybdenum containing proteins in response to changing growth conditions
Ulrike Kappler and   Amanda S. Nouwens
Metallomics, 2013,5, 325-334
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20230A

Effects of large-scale amino acid substitution in the polypeptide tether connecting the heme and molybdenum domains on catalysis in human sulfite oxidase
Kayunta Johnson-Winters, Anna R. Nordstrom, Amanda C. Davis, Gordon Tollin and   John H. Enemark
Metallomics, 2010,2, 766-770
DOI: 10.1039/C0MT00021C

Molybdenum metabolism in the alga Chlamydomonas stands at the crossroad of those in Arabidopsis and humans
Ángel Llamas, Manuel Tejada-Jiménez, Emilio Fernández and   Aurora Galvána
Metallomics, 2011,3, 578-590
DOI: 10.1039/C1MT00032B

Molybdenum can be found in the oceans

A proteome investigation of roxarsone degradation by Alkaliphilus oremlandii strain OhILAs
Peter Chovanec, John F. Stolz and   Partha Basu
Metallomics, 2010,2, 133-139
DOI: 10.1039/B915479E

A survey of arsenic, manganese, boron, thorium, and other toxic metals in the groundwater of a West Bengal, India neighbourhood
Thomas Bacquart, Kelly Bradshaw, Seth Frisbie, Erika Mitchell, George Springston, Jeffrey Defelice, Hannah Dustinc and   Bibudhendra Sarkar
Metallomics, 2012,4, 653-659
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20020A

Low-molecular-mass metal complexes in the mouse brain
Sean P. McCormick, Mrinmoy Chakrabarti, Allison L. Cockrell, Jinkyu Park, Lora S. Lindahla and   Paul A. Lindahl
Metallomics, 2013,5, 232-241
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00009E

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