Author Archive

Metallomics 2014 Impact Factor

We are pleased to announce the latest impact factor for Metallomics is 3.585 according to the 2014 Journal Citation Reports ®.

We would like to thank all of our authors, referees, Editorial and Advisory Board members for their contributions to the success of Metallomics.

Submit your best work to Metallomics today.

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Call for papers: themed issue dedicated to the contribution of metals to infectious diseases and nutritional immunity

COver image of Metallomics issue 9You are invited to contribute to the upcoming Metallomics themed issue highlighting the contribution of metals to infectious diseases and nutritional immunity.

For your article to be considered for the themed issue we must receive your manuscript by December 15th 2014.

Guest Edited by Professors Eric Skaar and Manuela Raffatellu, this upcoming themed issue will highlight the significant progress and developments across the breadth of the subject area and welcomes communications, full papers and review articles.

Metals are required for all life on earth and microbial pathogens are no exception to this rule. Accordingly, vertebrates have evolved to sequester these essential nutrients in a process known as nutritional immunity. The struggle for nutrient metal between host and pathogen has emerged as one of the most critical determinants of the outcome of infection.

If you would like to know more about the issue, or are interested in submitting a research paper or review article, please contact us.

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7th Asian Biological Inorganic Chemistry Conference

AsBIC7 PROGRAM

The AsBIC7 organising committee have now put together an exciting scientific program involving 90 plenary, keynote and invited speakers in the following themes:

•  Bioinspired Chemistry
•  Bioinorganic Materials and Nanotechnology
•  Environmental Biological Inorganic Chemistry
•  Metal Ion Transport and Homeostasis
•  Metalloproteins –  Structure and Function
•  Metals in Medicine
•  Metals in Physiology and Disease
•  Molecular Imaging – Multiple Modalities
•  Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry

>> CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION

Don’t miss the opportunity to participate in this exciting conference. Poster Abstracts close on Friday 17 October 2014.

Check the AsBIC7 Facebook page for regular updates, announcements and profiles of speakers.

REMINDER OF CURRENT IMPORTANT DATES

The AsBIC7 conference runs from 30 November to 5 December 2014

17 Oct 2014 –  Abstract submission deadline for Poster presentations

24 Oct 2014  –  Accommodation Booking Deadline

* Registration must be completed prior to abstract submission

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON ABSTRACTS  >> CLICK HERE

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Website: www.asbic7.org

Keynote and Invited speakers: http://www.asbic7.org/keynote-and-invited-speakers

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ASBIC7

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ASBIC7

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HOT articles in Metallomics

Take a look at our selected HOT articles just published in Metallomics: these papers will be free to read for the next four weeks. Enjoy!

Imaging of intracellular metal partitioning in marine diatoms exposed to metal pollution: consequences to cellular toxicity and metal fate in the environment
Rita M. Godinho, Maria Teresa Cabrita, Luís C. Alves and Teresa Pinheiro  
Metallomics, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4MT00105B, Paper

A dual-targeting, apoptosis-inducing organometallic half-sandwich iridium anticancer complex
Vojtech Novohradsky, Lenka Zerzankova, Jana Stepankova, Anna Kisova, Hana Kostrhunova, Zhe Liu, Peter J. Sadler, Jana Kasparkova and Viktor Brabec 
Metallomics, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4MT00112E, Paper

Quantitative bioimaging by LA-ICP-MS: a methodological study on the distribution of Pt and Ru in viscera originating from cisplatin- and KP1339-treated mice
Alexander E. Egger, Sarah Theiner, Christoph Kornauth, Petra Heffeter, Walter Berger, Bernhard K. Keppler and Christian G. Hartinger 
Metallomics, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4MT00072B, Paper

Ruthenium polypyridyl complexes as inducer of ROS-mediated apoptosis in cancer cells by targeting thioredoxin reductase
Zuandi Luo, Lianling Yu, Fang Yang, Zhennan Zhao, Bo Yu, Haoqiang Lai, Ka-Hing Wong, Sai-Ming Ngai, Wenjie Zheng and Tianfeng Chen 
Metallomics, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4MT00044G, Paper

A comprehensive biological insight of trinuclear copper(II)–tin(IV) chemotherapeutic anticancer drug entity: in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo systemic toxicity studies
Yusra Zaidi, Farukh Arjmand, Nida Zaidi, Jawed Ahmad Usmani, Haseeb Zubair, Kafil Akhtar, Mobarak Hossain and G. G. H. A. Shadab 
Metallomics, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4MT00035H, Paper

XAS and XFM studies of selenium and copper speciation and distribution in the kidneys of selenite-supplemented rats
Claire M. Weekley, Anu Shanu, Jade B. Aitken, Stefan Vogt, Paul K. Witting and Hugh H. Harris 
Metallomics, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4MT00088A, Paper

Zinc ions modulate protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B activity
Elisa Bellomo, Alberto Massarotti, Christer Hogstrand and Wolfgang Maret 
Metallomics, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4MT00086B, Paper

Detailed analysis of pro-apoptotic signaling and metabolic adaptation triggered by a N-heterocyclic carbene–gold(I) complex
Pavlo Holenya, Suzan Can, Riccardo Rubbiani, Hamed Alborzinia, Anja Jünger, Xinlai Cheng, Ingo Ott and Stefan Wölfl  
Metallomics, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4MT00075G, Paper

Imbalance of iron influx and efflux causes brain iron accumulation over time in the healthy adult rat
Jie-Hua Chen, Nadia Singh, Huimin Tay and Thomas Walczyk 
Metallomics, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4MT00054D, Paper

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A 50 million year old snapshot of leaf chemistry

Image of a leafUnderstanding the past lets us rationalise the present and plan for the future. For the trivial it can be pretty simple, what time you need to leave home to get to the office, or when you’ll next need to buy milk are pretty easy to predict based on past events. For more complex systems, over larger timescales, things can get a little more complicated.

Studying the chemical processes and biological pathways in plant life is crucial if we are to understand the living world around us; how it was, how it is and how it will be. Researchers from University of Manchester, Diamond Light Source and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource have studied the metallome of a 50 million year old leaf and remarkably have shown that the metal distribution correlates to the original leaf biochemistry.

Using synchrotron rapid scanning X-ray fluorescence (SRS-XRF), a non-destructive technique, the team have revealed for the first time the metallome of a fossilised plant. “This opens up the possibility to study part of the biochemistry of ancient plants, so in the future, it may enable us [to] observe the changes, if any, in the use of metals by the plant kingdom through geological time” explains Dr Nicholas Edwards, lead author of the study.

You can read more about the team’s research by downloading their open access article below, or for information on the research project and quotes from the scientific team, head over to the University of Manchester’s website.

Leaf metallome preserved over 50 million years
N. P. Edwards, P. L. Manning, U. Bergmann, P. L. Larson, B. E. van Dongen, W. I. Sellers, S. M. Webb, D. Sokaras, R. Alonso-Mori, K. Ignatyev, H. E. Barden, A. van Veelen, J. Anné, V. M. Egerton and R. A. Wogelius
Metallomics, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00242J

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Uncovering the Role of Serum Ferritin: A Resolution to a Paradox?

Schematic overview of the Role of Ferritin in Iron Metabolism

Overview of the Role of Ferritin in Iron Metabolism

This post was written By Pui Sai Lau, Web Writer.
While ferritin is understood to be an intracellular protein required for the storage and controlled release of iron, its role as an inflammatory disease marker is unclear. Perplexingly, though ferritin is not created in serum, it is present there and the level of serum ferritin is often measured to indicate the iron status of a patient. However, to suitably use serum ferritin as a disease marker, a number of questions first need to be addressed. Does serum ferritin directly cause inflammation or is it a by-product of another cellular mechanism? What exactly is the role of ferritin in iron metabolism? Douglas B. Kell from the University of Manchester, UK and Etheresia Pretorius from the University of Pretoria, South Africa examine what is currently known about serum ferritin to deduce its possible role in biology, and evaluate its role as a marker of disease. Read their perspective by accessing link below. Do you agree or disagree with their conclusion? Share your thoughts by leaving a comment.

Serum ferritin is an important inflammatory disease marker, as it is mainly a leakage product from damaged cells
Douglas B. Kell and Etheresia Pretorius
Metallomics, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00347G, Perspective

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Tracing the metals in Alzheimer’s disease

PLS-DA results of metal analysis

This post has been written by Polly-Anna Ashford, a PhD student at the University of East Anglia, web-writer for Analyst and Analytical Methods and guest web-writer for Metallomics.

The role of metals in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has been under investigation since the 1990s. Essential metals such as iron, copper and zinc have been linked to changes in proteins in AD patients. Toxic metals like arsenic and lead are also implicated, and aluminium is believed to have a significant role in degeneration. The measurement of metal concentrations in the brain is therefore an important investigative tool for AD researchers. The characterisation of metal ion complexes and metalloproteins is traditionally carried out by separation of the species by techniques such as size exclusion chromatography, followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

1
In this study, led by Tamara García-Barrera and José Luis Gómez-Ariza at the University of Huelva, Spain, human blood serum samples were analysed by ICP-MS to establish the concentration of a range of different elements. The researchers were able to distinguish between high and low molecular weight metal species by precipitating the proteins and analysing both the supernatant and the precipitate. Samples from patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease were compared with healthy controls. From the results of their high throughput methodology, the authors have been able to draw significant conclusions about the link between changes in brain metal concentration and the advancement of neurodegenerative processes.

You can download the full artice below, which is free to access until March 3rd

Characterization of metal profiles in serum during the progression of Alzheimer’s disease
Raúl González-Domínguez, Tamara García-Barrera and José Luis Gómez-Ariza
Metallomics, 2014, 6, 292-300
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00301A

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