Author Archive

Poster Prize Winners at Metals in Medicine GRC

Congratulations to the three poster prize winners at the recent Metals in Medicine GRC, that was held at Proctor Academy, Andover, NH, USA, June 24-29, 2018.

Poster prize winnersEach prize winner won a certificate, £100 book voucher and heat sensitive colour-changing RSC mug. Prizes were sponsored by RSC journals Metallomics, Dalton Transactions and Chemical Society Reviews.

From left to right:

Angela Casini (Vice Chair), Kenneth Kam-Wing Lo (Chair), Jacqueline Zaengle-Barone (Duke University), Anja Busemann (Leiden University), Namrata Singh (Indian Institute of Science), Seth M. Cohen (Chair), Edith (Phoebe) P. Glazer (Vice Chair)

Well done once again to the prize winners and also to everyone who presented at the meeting.

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Are you going to be at the Metals in Medicine GRC?

Will you be at the Metals in Medicine GRC, June 24-29, Andover, NH, USA?

Metals in Medicine is a cross-cutting field that incorporates scientific advances in inorganic chemistry, cell and molecular biology, advanced spectroscopy and biophysics, nuclear medicine, medicinal chemistry, clinical medicine, and other disciplines in ways that leverage knowledge of metals to prevent, diagnose, and treat human disease. Recent discoveries in the field have advanced our collective understanding of the role of metals in medicine, bioinorganic chemistry, and imaging technologies, which in turn enhances the potential for the development of metal-based drugs and drugs that act on metallobiological targets.

Metallomics will be co-sponsoring three poster prizes, so best of luck!

Rebecca Brodie Rebecca Brodie, Deputy Editor, Metallomics, will be attending.

Please feel free to get in touch with me to arrange a meeting: metallomics-rsc@rsc.org

I look forward to meeting you in Andover!

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London Metallomics Consortium Inaugural Meeting

London Metallomics Consortium Inaugural Meeting

29th June 2018, 2-5 pm, Franklin Wilkins Bldg, Lecture Theatre B5

Trace metals can be essential to health or environmental hazards. In a major new initiative, academics from across King’s Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine have teamed up to promote research into the role of trace metals in health and disease, by forming the London Metallomics Consortium with colleagues from all the London universities. Following success in obtaining funding from the Wellcome Trust and King’s to set up the London Metallomics Facility, the Consortium invites you to its inaugural symposium.

Speakers:
John Viles, QMU (Amyloid β assembly and metal ions in Alzheimer’s disease)
Phil Blower, KCL (PET metallomics: in vivo imaging of trace metal trafficking with radioisotopes)
Guy Rutter, IC (Zinc in pancreatic islet biology and diabetes)
Po-Wah So, KCL (Iron in the ageing brain)
Ian Mudway, KCL (Non-occupational exposures to inhaled metals: Do they matter?)
Maciej Garbowski, UCL (Non-transferrin bound iron – methodological challenges and future perspectives)
Paul Sharp, KCL (Assessing mineral bioavailability from plant-based foods)

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Themed collection on Iron in Biology now online

A new themed collection for Metallomics titled “Iron in Biology” is now online for you to read and enjoy.

Guest Edited by Vincenzo Abbate and Robert Hider this collection of papers represents the latest high-impact research in iron in biology and its role in agriculture, health and disease. Covering topics such as iron uptake in microorganisms, plants and parasites, iron deficiency or overload, and iron chelation therapy as well as the role of haem and haemoproteins, iron homeostasis, iron transport and storage proteins, and Fe-S clusters.

We hope you enjoy the collection!

Why not submit your high impact research to Metallomics today.

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New Metallomics Impact Factor released: 4.0!

Metallomics, 2014, Issue 1We are pleased to announce that our latest Impact Factor* is 4.0!

Metallomics continues to be the home for research on global approaches to metals in the biosciences and is a core publication for the metallomics community as they strive to fully understand the role of metals in biological, environmental and clinical systems.

The Editorial office thanks all of our Board members, authors, readers and reviewers for their continued support.

We invite you to submit your latest piece of high impact research here.

Click through to see how the other Royal Society of Chemistry journals did.

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. Data based on 2013 Journal Citation Reports®, (Thomson Reuters, 2014).

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Themed issue on Metals in Marine Biochemistry

Iron transport and storage in the coccolithophore: Emiliania huxleyi

Carrano et al., Metallomics, 2012, 4, 1160-1166

We would like to remind our readers about an upcoming themed issue of Metallomics focused on Metals in Marine BiochemistryMetallomics is a journal seeking to be a highly visible home for leading research directed at understanding the role of biometals in complex systems.  It is natural fit for work from the environmental bioinorganic chemistry community.

If you work in this area, why not submit your next paper to Metallomics?

Submission deadline:  31st January 2014

Guest Edited by Mak Saito, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and Rachel Narehood Austin, Bates College.

All articles will be peer-reviewed and, to be suitable for publication, must meet the usual quality and significance standards of the journal. Please indicate in your covering letter that your article is to be considered for the Metals in Marine Biochemistry themed issue.

Email us at METALLOMICS-RSC@rsc.org for more information.

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Metallomics Impact Factor rises to 4.1!

We are delighted to announce that our Impact Factor* has risen to an impressive 4.1!

Metallomics continues to be the home for research on global approaches to metals in biology and is a core publication for the metallomics community as they strive to fully understand the role of metals in biological, environmental and clinical systems.

The Editorial Office thanks all of our Board members, authors and readers for their continued support.

We invite you to submit your latest piece of research here.

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. Data based on 2012 Journal Citation Reports®, (Thomson Reuters, 2013).

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Metal of the Month: Gadolinium

GadoliniumNot a terribly well known metal, this lanthanide is found in a number of everyday products. A silvery-white metal that is very malleable, gadolinium is only ever found in nature in minerals. Discovered by Swiss chemist Jean Charles Galissard de Marignac, the element is named in honour of Finnish chemist and geologist Johan Gadolin.

Gadolinium is a useful addition to alloys, making them more resistant to high temperature and oxidation, and is often found in magnets, electronic components and recording heads of video recorders. It has also been used to make green phosphors for colour televisions and in the production of CDs.

VHS CD electronics

CDs and the recording heads of video recorders often contain Gd

Because of its paramagnetic properties, in medicine gadolinium complexes are used as contrasting agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially in diagnosing cancerous tumours, as it accumulates in abnormal tissue of the brain and body. Currently gadolinium does not have any known biological role.

Recent research has suggested that gadolinium could be a greener replacement for CFCs in refrigeration.

Gadolinium also has a number of other specialized roles including: in the shielding of nuclear reactors, in neutron therapy, and in nuclear marine propulsion.

If you want to know more about gadolinium, take a look at the papers below and discover all about the latest gadolinium research. These will be free to read until June 15th.

You can also take a look at the RSC Visual Element Periodic Table, and the Chemistry in its Element podcast.

And if you work in the area of gadolinium biology, we hope you will consider submitting your next paper to Metallomics

MRI scan

Gadolinium complexes are used as contrasting agents for MRI scans

Lanthanides inhibit adipogenesis with promotion of cell proliferation in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes
Cong-Cong Hou, Min Feng, Kui Wang and Xiao-Gai Yang
Metallomics, 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00020F

Receptor recognition of transferrin bound to lanthanides and actinides: a discriminating step in cellular acquisition of f-block metals
Gauthier J.-P. Deblonde, Manuel Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Anne B. Mason and Rebecca J. Abergel
Metallomics, 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT20237B

Accumulation of rare earth elements in human bone within the lifespan
Sofia Zaichick, Vladimir Zaichick, Vasilii Karandashev and Sergey Nosenko
Metallomics, 2011, 3, 186-194
DOI: 10.1039/C0MT00069H

Nuclear reactor cooling towers

This element is used in the shielding of nuclear reactors

Simple and rapid quantification of gadolinium in urine and blood plasma samples by means of total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF)
Lena Telgmann, Michael Holtkamp, Jens Künnemeyer, Carsten Gelhard, Marcel Hartmann, Annika Klose, Michael Sperling and Uwe Karst
Metallomics, 2011, 3, 1035-1040
DOI: 10.1039/C1MT00054C

Identification and characterization of gadolinium(III) complexes in biological tissue extracts
Chethaka L. Kahakachchi and Dennis A. Moore
Metallomics, 2010, 2, 490-497
DOI: 10.1039/B915806E

Incorporation of excess gadolinium into human bone from medical contrast agents
Thomas H. Darrah, Jennifer J. Prutsman-Pfeiffer, Robert J. Poreda, M. Ellen Campbell, Peter V. Hauschka and Robyn E. Hannigan
Metallomics, 2009, 1, 479-488
DOI: 10.1039/B905145G

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Metallomics Issue 5 out now- Metallomics in Japan

Synthesis of antitumor azolato-bridged dinuclear platinum(II) complexes with in vivo antitumor efficacy and unique in vitro cytotoxicity profiles

Metallomics, 2013, 5, 461-468

This month’s latest issue of Metallomics is devoted to the exciting and fascinating work of this field coming from Japan. Originating from the 3rd Metallomics Research Forum in Japan held on August 30 and 31, 2012 in Showa Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo, this themed issue is Guest Edited by Yasumitsu Ogra and Seiichiro Himeno. You can read their Editorial by clicking on the link below. We hope you enjoy the issue.

Metallomics in Japan
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 415-416
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT90014B

Our wonderfully colourful outside front cover is from Seiji Komeda from Suzuka University of Medical Science, who with colleagues have been working with platinum complexes and looking at their antitumor properties.

A coupling system of capillary gel electrophoresis with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for the determination of double stranded DNA fragments

Metallomics, 2013, 5, 424-428

Synthesis of antitumor azolato-bridged dinuclear platinum(II) complexes with in vivo antitumor efficacy and unique in vitro cytotoxicity profiles
Seiji Komeda, Hiroshi Takayama, Toshihiro Suzuki, Akira Odani, Takao Yamori and Masahiko Chikuma
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 461-468
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00040K

On the inside front cover is work looking at DNA fragments by coupling capillary gel electrophoresis with ICP-MS. Shin-ichiro Fujii from AIST and co-workers were able to successfully separate and analyse fragments of double-stranded DNA.

A coupling system of capillary gel electrophoresis with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for the determination of double stranded DNA fragments
Shin-ichiro Fujii, Kazumi Inagaki, Shin-ichi Miyashita, Keisuke Nagasawa, Koichi Chiba and Akiko Takatsu
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 424-428
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00057E

Selenium metabolism and excretion in mice after injection of 82Se-enriched selenomethionine

Metallomics, 2013, 5, 445-452

On the back cover we showcase research into mammalian metabolism of organic selenium compounds by Naoki Furuta in the Department of Applied Chemistry at Chuo University, Tokyo, Japan and colleagues in the Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, Department of Internal Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Organic selenium compounds in plants and yeasts are effective chemoprotectants in mammalian cancer. In their research they identified selenomethionine pathways by measuring endogenous and exogenous 82Se levels and quantified selenium compounds and selenoproteins in mice liver, kidneys, plasma and urine.

Selenium metabolism and excretion in mice after injection of 82Se-enriched selenomethionine
Yoshinari Suzuki, Yoshiteru Hashiura, Tatsuya Sakai, Takao Yamamoto, Takehisa Matsukawa, Atsuko Shinohara and Naoki Furuta
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 445-452
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT20267D

Along with these new covers, here is a couple of HOT papers free for you until May 20th . To read the full articles, please access the links below:

Evaluation of quantitative probes for weaker Cu(I) binding sites completes a set of four capable of detecting Cu(I) affinities from nanomolar to attomolar
Zhiguang Xiao, Lisa Gottschlich, Renate van der Meulen, Saumya R. Udagedara and   Anthony G. Wedd
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 501-513
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00032J

Suppression of ZIP8 expression is a common feature of cadmium-resistant and manganese-resistant RBL-2H3 cells
Hitomi Fujishiro, Toshinao Ohashi, Miki Takuma and   Seiichiro Himeno  
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 437-444
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00003F

Analysis of animal and plant selenometabolites in roots of a selenium accumulator, Brassica rapa var. peruviridis, by speciation
Yasumitsu Ogra, Ayane Katayama, Yurie Ogihara, Ayako Yawata and   Yasumi Anan 
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 429-436
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20187A

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What’s HOT in issue 12?

As well as our two front covers, we have a number of additional HOT papers in this issue of Metallomics. Take a look at some of the hot science that we have published in this latest issue.

Cytochrome b5 from Giardia lamblia
Samiah Alam, Janet Yee, Manon Couture, Shin-ichi J. Takayama, Wan-Hsin Tseng, A. Grant Mauk and Steven Rafferty
Metallomics, 2012, 4, 1255-1261
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20152F

The interplay between vacuolar and siderophore-mediated iron storage in Aspergillus fumigatus
Fabio Gsaller, Martin Eisendle, Beatrix Elisabeth Lechner, Markus Schrettl, Herbert Lindner, Daniela Müller, Stephan Geley and Hubertus Haas
Metallomics
, 2012, 4, 1262-1270
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20179H

Contrasting cellular uptake pathways for chlorido and iodido iminopyridine ruthenium arene anticancer complexes
Isolda Romero-Canelón, Ana M. Pizarro, Abraha Habtemariam and Peter J. Sadler
Metallomics, 2012, 4, 1271-1279
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20189E

These papers will be free to read until Dec 7th.

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