Metallomics Issue 5 out now- Metallomics in Japan

Synthesis of antitumor azolato-bridged dinuclear platinum(II) complexes with in vivo antitumor efficacy and unique in vitro cytotoxicity profiles

Metallomics, 2013, 5, 461-468

This month’s latest issue of Metallomics is devoted to the exciting and fascinating work of this field coming from Japan. Originating from the 3rd Metallomics Research Forum in Japan held on August 30 and 31, 2012 in Showa Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo, this themed issue is Guest Edited by Yasumitsu Ogra and Seiichiro Himeno. You can read their Editorial by clicking on the link below. We hope you enjoy the issue.

Metallomics in Japan
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 415-416
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT90014B

Our wonderfully colourful outside front cover is from Seiji Komeda from Suzuka University of Medical Science, who with colleagues have been working with platinum complexes and looking at their antitumor properties.

A coupling system of capillary gel electrophoresis with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for the determination of double stranded DNA fragments

Metallomics, 2013, 5, 424-428

Synthesis of antitumor azolato-bridged dinuclear platinum(II) complexes with in vivo antitumor efficacy and unique in vitro cytotoxicity profiles
Seiji Komeda, Hiroshi Takayama, Toshihiro Suzuki, Akira Odani, Takao Yamori and Masahiko Chikuma
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 461-468
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00040K

On the inside front cover is work looking at DNA fragments by coupling capillary gel electrophoresis with ICP-MS. Shin-ichiro Fujii from AIST and co-workers were able to successfully separate and analyse fragments of double-stranded DNA.

A coupling system of capillary gel electrophoresis with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for the determination of double stranded DNA fragments
Shin-ichiro Fujii, Kazumi Inagaki, Shin-ichi Miyashita, Keisuke Nagasawa, Koichi Chiba and Akiko Takatsu
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 424-428
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00057E

Selenium metabolism and excretion in mice after injection of 82Se-enriched selenomethionine

Metallomics, 2013, 5, 445-452

On the back cover we showcase research into mammalian metabolism of organic selenium compounds by Naoki Furuta in the Department of Applied Chemistry at Chuo University, Tokyo, Japan and colleagues in the Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, Department of Internal Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Organic selenium compounds in plants and yeasts are effective chemoprotectants in mammalian cancer. In their research they identified selenomethionine pathways by measuring endogenous and exogenous 82Se levels and quantified selenium compounds and selenoproteins in mice liver, kidneys, plasma and urine.

Selenium metabolism and excretion in mice after injection of 82Se-enriched selenomethionine
Yoshinari Suzuki, Yoshiteru Hashiura, Tatsuya Sakai, Takao Yamamoto, Takehisa Matsukawa, Atsuko Shinohara and Naoki Furuta
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 445-452
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT20267D

Along with these new covers, here is a couple of HOT papers free for you until May 20th . To read the full articles, please access the links below:

Evaluation of quantitative probes for weaker Cu(I) binding sites completes a set of four capable of detecting Cu(I) affinities from nanomolar to attomolar
Zhiguang Xiao, Lisa Gottschlich, Renate van der Meulen, Saumya R. Udagedara and   Anthony G. Wedd
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 501-513
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00032J

Suppression of ZIP8 expression is a common feature of cadmium-resistant and manganese-resistant RBL-2H3 cells
Hitomi Fujishiro, Toshinao Ohashi, Miki Takuma and   Seiichiro Himeno  
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 437-444
DOI: 10.1039/C3MT00003F

Analysis of animal and plant selenometabolites in roots of a selenium accumulator, Brassica rapa var. peruviridis, by speciation
Yasumitsu Ogra, Ayane Katayama, Yurie Ogihara, Ayako Yawata and   Yasumi Anan 
Metallomics, 2013, 5, 429-436
DOI: 10.1039/C2MT20187A

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