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Lab on a chip – from molecular assays to organs on a chip: a symposium by the Royal Society of Chemistry and ETH Zurich

The Lab on a chip – from molecular assays to organs on a chip symposium by the Royal Society of Chemistry and ETH Zurich will be held on 10th April 2018, Basel, Switzerland. 

The Royal Society of Chemistry journal Lab on a Chip and ETH Zurich are delighted to present this symposium, which will showcase the high impact research from the groups of the Lab on a Chip Editorial Board members. The research presented will be on a wide variety of cutting-edge topics in line with the ethos and scope of the journal.

Editor-in-Chief, Abe Lee, Associate Editor, Petra Dittrich and Executive Editor, Sam Keltie warmly invite you to take part in this event and look forward to welcoming you in Basel.

Speakers

To be confirmed

Aims

The symposium will bring together exceptional researchers – all leading names in their field – for an outstanding plenary programme, together with an open lunch for all attendees that will provide many networking opportunities.

Venue

Hotel Bildungszentrum 21, Missionsstr. 21, CH – 4055 Basel, Switzerland

Contact Information

Dr Sam Keltie

Executive Editor, Lab on a Chip

Royal Society of Chemistry

Email: loc-rsc@rsc.org

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MMB 2018

The 9th International Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology (MMB 2018) is being held in California, USA on March 26-28, 2018

The primary purpose of the conference is to foster interactions between biologists and medical researchers; chemists, physicists and engineers to enhance and strengthen the potential of microtechnologies in revolutionizing the fields of medicine and biological sciences through the development of new research tools and technologies.

The conference is set to have a great talks, with Keynote lectures from Seok “Sid” Chung, Korea University; Jianping Fu, University of Michigan; Amy Herr, University of California, Berkeley; Henry Hess, Columbia University; Marianna Kruithof-de Julio, University of Bern; and Milica Radisic, University of Toronto.

Key Dates:

Late News deadline: 6th February 2018

Early Bird Registration: 13th February 2018

Regular Registration: 21st March 2018

 

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Magnetic separation of circulating tumor cells…but it’s not what you think

Cancers typically originate in one organ yet can spread to distant regions of the body forming secondary tumours called metastases. This happens as cells from the primary tumour migrate into the circulatory system and then travel to other organs. These cells, which are a very rare population within the circulatory system, are termed circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Because of their role in cancer biology, they have garnered a lot of interest lately. Their detection and isolation present several analytical challenges. For one, they are the proverbial “needle in a haystack”, with counts on the order of one CTC for every billion blood cells. This has traditionally led to a paradox: these rare cells are best handled in microscale systems but the world-to-chip mismatch limits microfluidic devices from rapidly processing the large (> 5 mL) samples necessary. Second, recent studies have revealed CTCs to be very heterogeneous populations, limiting the use of surface markers for labelling and capturing a broad range of CTCs. Because there is much still to learn about CTCs, there’s also an interest in recovering viable CTCs for further analysis. In their recent report, Zhao et al. demonstrate a microfluidic device capable of enriching CTCs using magnetic separation. But it’s not that typical magnetophoretic separations you may be familiar with!

Magnetic separation of circulating tumor cells - nanoparticles

Rather than using magnetic particles to bind to surface antigens and eventually separate out CTCs, they capitalize on a phenomenon known as “negative magnetophoresis”. Cells are suspended within a uniformly magnetic medium and application of a non-uniform magnetic field results in a magnetic buoyant force. (This is akin to how negative dielectrophoresis exerts a force on particles in a non-uniform electric field.) The advantage of this method is that the “working principle applies to every non-magnetic material,” according to Prof. Leidong Mao. “Naturally,” he thought “it could apply to CTC enrichment.” However, despite previous work separating different cell populations with negative magnetophoresis, moving to CTC enrichment is not so straightforward. CTC enrichment is the most challenging separation. “All previous applications in our group are with cells at high concentrations,” mentioned Prof. Mao. The main challenge in developing the chip was trying to preserve the characteristics of an “ideal” CTC enrichment device; one that could process a significant amount of blood quickly, have a high recovery rate of CTCs, give reasonable purity of isolated CTCs, and retain cell integrity and viability for further analysis.

With this method, heterogeneous populations of CTCs can be enriched as selection is size dependent rather than based on expression of certain surface markers. This also avoids the costs associated with traditional magnetic labelling – typically used to label and deplete the millions of white blood cells. The device is capable of working at flow rates of 5-7 mL/hr, which is what is necessary to process an entire blood sample and can achieve high recovery rates (>90%). While the authors report purities that appear low (10-12%), they are working on improving purity. One strategy they suggest in their report is to follow the route of the iChip and combine size based separations with magnetic WBC depletion.

To read the full paper for free*, click the link below:

Label-free ferrohydrodynamic cell separation of circulating tumor cells
DOI: 10.1039/C7LC00680B (Paper) Lab Chip, 2017, 17, 3097-3111

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About the Webwriter

Darius Rackus is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Toronto working in the Wheeler Lab. His research interests are in combining sensors with digital microfluidics for healthcare applications.

*free to access until 14th December 2017

 

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Early Career Researcher workshop on Diagnostics for Antimicrobial Resistance

Early Career Researcher workshop on Diagnostics for Antimicrobial Resistance

20 November 2017, London, UK           

Join a diverse delegate list of early career researchers and invited experts to discuss the barriers and opportunities facing the development of rapid diagnostics for infectious disease.

Our speakers include:

  • Jim Huggett LGC & University of Surrey, United Kingdom
  • David H Persing Executive VP, Chief Medical & Technology Officer, Cepheid, United States
  • Bhargavi Rao Médecins Sans Frontières, Switzerland
  • Tim Rawson Imperial College London, United Kingdom
  • Annegret Schneider University College London, United Kingdom
  • Chris Walton Cranfield University, United Kingdom

The main themes identified at this workshop will be shared with various research funders and stakeholders. Don’t miss this chance to discuss some of the exciting developments in diagnostics for AMR and to share your thoughts about how to support early career researchers working in this field.

Register by 6th November to attend!

To find out more and register, please visit: http://rsc.li/diagnostics4AMR

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ICAS 2017 – International Congress on Analytical Sciences

ICAS 2017 is the 5 yearly international congress organised by the Chinese Chemical Society (CCS) and the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). The event takes place at the Hainan International Convention and Exhibition Centre in Hainan, China between 5th and 8th May 2017. The theme of this year’s congress is “Analytical Chemistry – From Tool to Science”, which will contain sessions on advanced instrumental analysis, nanoscience and nanotechnology, biological and bioanalysis, environmental sciences, food safety, micro-analysis and microfluidic, sensors systems, mass spectrometry, separation and chromatography, spectrometry/spectroscopy, and electrochemical analysis. The Royal Society of Chemistry Journals Lab on a Chip, Analyst and Analytical Methods are very pleased to be supporting this event.

Visit the conference website for further details on themes and speakers and to submit your abstract.

Important Dates:
Abstract Submission Deadline: 28th February 2017

Early Bird Registration Deadline: 31st March 2017

 Register now to attend and present your work!

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A new ‘on-chip’ immunoassay device

Professor Yarmash‘s lab at Rutgers University have developed a proof of concept microfluidic device, capable of running multiple immunoassays in parallel. The device allows 32 samples to be assayed simultaneously and multiple analytes can be tested in each sample.

As shown in the diagram below, each sample inlet has a bead trap that contains antibody-conjugated microbeads. These are commercially available, allowing virtually any analyte to be tested. The sample flows over the beads at an optimised rate, allowing the analytes to bind to their specific antibodies. A secondary antibody is added that binds to antibodies complexed to analytes, followed by a fluorescent tag that binds to the secondary antibody. The microbeads are then collected, placed in a 96 well plate, and analysed.

a) diagram and b) photo of the device; c) diagram of valve configuration and flow pathways during the assay; d) key steps in assay.

Device layout and assay principle

The authors assayed several proteins from an in vitro supernatant and their results corroborated well with a standard benchtop immunoassay. Compared to the benchtop standard, the device has significantly reduced sample consumption as well as large reductions in microbead and detection antibody consumption. It has comparable sensitivity to the benchtop standard and has a large working range, meaning that analytes present at different concentrations in the sample can be measured simultaneously. In addition to this, it is compatible with commercial reagents and analyte concentration can be quantified. Although previously published devices have addressed some of these characteristics, this the first example where they are combined into one device.

Moving on from their proof-of-concept study, the Yarmash group hopes to develop a device capable of in vivo measurements. One example they give is analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in rats, an important animal model in Alzheimer’s research, where immunoassays are currently limited by the small volumes available.


To download the full article for free* click the link below:

Development and validation of a microfluidic immunoassay capable of multiplexing parallel samples in microliter volumes
Mehdi Ghodbane, Elizabeth C. Stucky, Tim J. Maguire, Rene S. Schloss, David I. Shreiber, Jeffrey D. Zahn and Martin L. Yarmush
Lab Chip
, 2015,15, 3211-3221
DOI:
10.1039/C5LC00398A

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About the webwriter

Claire Weston is a PhD student in the Fuchter Group, at Imperial College London. Her work is focused on developing novel photoswitches and photoswitchable inhibitors.

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*Access is free until 19/11/2015 through a registered RSC account – click here to register

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New YouTube Videos

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Top 10 most accessed Lab on a Chip articles in June 2015

In June 2015, our most downloaded Lab on a Chip articles were:

Shia-Yen Teh, Robert Lin, Lung-Hsin Hung and Abraham P. Lee
DOI: 10.1039/B715524G

Ali Kemal Yetisen, Muhammad Safwan Akram and Christopher R. Lowe
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC50169H

Russell H. Cole, Niek de Lange, Zev J. Gartner and Adam R. Abate
DOI: 10.1039/C5LC00333D

Ching-Hui Lin, Yi-Hsing Hsiao, Hao-Chen Chang, Chuan-Feng Yeh, Cheng-Kun He, Eric M. Salm, Chihchen Chen, Ing-Ming Chiu and Chia-Hsien Hsu
DOI: 10.1039/C5LC00541H

Friedrich Schuler, Frank Schwemmer, Martin Trotter, Simon Wadle, Roland Zengerle, Felix von Stetten and Nils Paust
DOI: 10.1039/C5LC00291E

Mei He, Jennifer Crow, Marc Roth, Yong Zeng and Andrew K. Godwin
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00662C

Joost F. Swennenhuis, Arjan G. J. Tibbe, Michiel Stevens, Madhumohan R. Katika, Joost van Dalum, Hien Duy Tong, Cees J. M. van Rijn and Leon W. M. M. Terstappen
DOI: 10.1039/C5LC00304K

A. Liga, A. D. B. Vliegenthart, W. Oosthuyzen, J. W. Dear and M. Kersaudy-Kerhoas
DOI: 10.1039/C5LC00240K

A. Wasay and D. Sameoto
DOI: 10.1039/C5LC00342C

Ivo Leibacher, Peter Reichert and Jürg Dual
DOI: 10.1039/C5LC00083A

Interesting read? Let us know your thoughts below.

And remember, you can submit directly to Lab on a Chip!

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New YouTube Videos

Multiplexed Paper Analytical Device for Measuring Airborne Metal Particulates with Distance-Based Detection 


 
  
 
Transportation, Dispersion and Ordering of Dense Colloidal Assemblies by Magnetic Interfacial Rotaphoresis 


 
   
Gecko Gaskets for Self-Sealing and High Strength Reversible Bonding of Microfluidics 

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New You Tube Videos

Generation of stable orthogonal gradients of chemical concentration and substrate stiffness in a microfluidic device 


 
  
 
Continuous Transfer of Liquid Metal Droplets Across a Fluid-Fluid Interface Within an Integrated Microfluidic Chip 


 
 
A flow-free droplet-based device for high throughput polymorphic crystallization 

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