Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

We are delighted to announce that Hang Lu is the 2019 winner of the “Pioneers of Miniaturization” Lectureship!

The 14th “Pioneers of Miniaturization” Lectureship, sponsored by Dolomite and Lab on a Chip , is for early to mid-career scientists who have made extraordinary or outstanding contributions to the understanding or development of miniaturised systems.

The 2019 “Pioneers of Miniaturization” Lectureship will be presented to Professor Lu at the µTAS 2019 Conference in Basel, Switzerland, being held on 27-31 October 2019. Professor Lu will receive a certificate, a monetary award and will give a short lecture during the conference.

Many congratulations to Professor Hang Lu on this achievement from the Lab on a Chip Team!

About the Winner

Professor Hang Lu is the Love Family Professor, School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA.

Professor Lu earned her PhD in Chemical Engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA in 2003. After a postdoctoral fellowship with Professor Cornelia I. Bargmann, at University of California San Francisco and the Rockefeller University, she was appointed as an Assistant Professor at School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology.

In recognition of her outstanding achievements, Professor Lu has received numerous awards and international recognition, including being invited to join Board of Directors, Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society, invited to present at the Nobel Symposium on Microfluidics (2017) and the National Academy of Sciences’ Kavli Frontiers of Science Symposia (2014, 2012, 2009), awarded the ACS Analytical Chemistry Young Innovator Award, Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society (2013), Council of Systems Biology in Boston (CSB2) Prize in Systems Biology (2011), a National Science Foundation CAREER award (2010), an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship (2009), a DARPA Young Faculty Award (2007), a DuPont Young Professor Award (2006), the Saville Lectureship of Princeton University (2013), the H. C. Van Ness Award Lectures of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (2011), and is a fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) and  a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). She has authored more than 140 peer-reviewed publications and has served on the Editorial Board of Lab on a Chip as Associate Editor since 2017. She is currently the director of the Interdisciplinary Bioengineering Program, and the associate director of the NSF-Simons Foundation supported Southeast Center for Mathematics and Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology.

Professor Lu has pioneered the use of microfluidic systems for imaging and performing genetic studies with small organisms, primarily the nematode C. elegans. In a series of studies published since 2008 she established a set of technologies to streamline imaging, phenotyping, and sorting of C. elegans based on features that are difficult to distinguish and discern by human eyes. The throughput of these technologies were often 1,000 times that of conventional approaches. Professor Lu’s technology has enable faster and more accurate experiments and revolutionized how genetic screens and high-content imaging experiments are done currently in other scientists’ labs. In parallel, her lab has also engineered micro systems for high-content experiments with cells, aggregates, organoids, and embryos to extract high-dimensional information for systems biology studies.

The Lu group performs research at the interface of engineering and biology. They engineer automated microfluidic systems, microscopy tools, and image imformatic technologies to address questions in neuroscience, cell biology, and biotechnology that are difficult to answer using conventional techniques. Applied to the study of fundamental biological questions, these new techniques allow the Lu group to gather large-scale quantitative data about complex systems.

Learn about the Lu group online

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Lab on a Chip thematic collection on droplet-based single cell sequencing

Lab on a Chip is delighted to share with you our Thematic Collection on droplet-based single-cell sequencing.

The droplet-based single-cell sequencing field is advancing very rapidly. Large numbers of studies are underway to collect and explore the new information that is now accessible with single-cell RNA-seq. Improvements to the microfluidics are also advancing rapidly. This collection of papers and reviews focusses on the between the technological advancements and high impact applications of droplet-based single-cell sequencing.

This topical and exciting collection is collated by Thought leader Dave Weitz and the Lab on a Chip Editorial Board. The collection is introduced in a perspective on single cell sequencing by the Thought leader Dave Weitz, and in two editorials, one on “InDrops and Drop-seq” by Allon Klein and Evan Macosko and one on “an engineer and business person’s perspective” by businessman and engineer Mark Gilligan.

Read the full collection at: http://rsc.li/drop-sc-seq

Below is a selection of content highlights featured in the collection. In addition, all papers are free to read until 31st May*

Perspective

Droplet-based single cell RNAseq tools: a practical guide

Robert Salomon, David Gallego-Ortega, et al.

Critical Review

Finding a helix in a haystack: nucleic acid cytometry with droplet microfluidics

Iain C. Clark and Adam R. Abate

Paper

High throughput gene expression profiling of yeast colonies with microgel-culture Drop-seq

Leqian Liu, Adam R. Abate, et al.

Paper

Simplified Drop-seq workflow with minimized bead loss using a bead capture and processing microfluidic chip

Marjan Biočanin, Bart Deplancke, et al.

Lab on a Chip is the leading journal publishing significant and original work related to miniaturisation, at the micro- and nano-scale, of interest to a multidisciplinary readership with an Journal Impact Factor of 5.995**. The journal is guided by Editor-in-Chief Abraham (Abe) Lee (University of California, Irvine) who is supported by our team of Associate Editors (Yoon-Kyoung Cho, Petra Dittrich, Hang Lu, Jianhua Qin, Manabu Tokeshi, Joel Voldman and Aaron Wheeler).

We hope you enjoy reading the papers within this Thematic Collection and we welcome future submissions on droplet-based single-cell sequencing.

Dolomite/Lab on a Chip Pioneers of Miniaturization Lectureshipdeadline approaching-nominate a colleague now!

Organ-on a-chip systems- translating concept into practice thematic collectionSubmit now

Organ-,body- and disease-on-a-chip thematic collectionRead now

Personalised medicine:liquid biopsyRead now

Lab on a Chip Emerging Investigator Series Apply now

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Lab on a Chip thematic collection on personalised medicine-liquid biopsy

Lab on a Chip is delighted to share with you our Thematic Collection on personalised medicine-liquid biopsy.

This collection of papers and reviews focusses on the interface between the technological advancements and high impact applications of liquid biopsy technologies. This collection is collated by Thought Leaders Mehmet Toner and Stefanie Jeffrey and the Lab on a Chip Editorial Board and is introduced in an Editorial by the Thought Leaders on Liquid biopsy: a perspective for probing blood for cancer

Read the full collection at: http://rsc.li/liquid-biopsy

Below is a selection of content highlights featured in the collection. In addition, all papers are free to read until 31st May*

Tutorial Review

Cancer diagnosis: from tumor to liquid biopsy and beyond

Ramanathan Vaidyanathan, Chwee Teck Lim, et al.

Critical Review

Circulating tumor DNA and liquid biopsy: opportunities, challenges, and recent advances in detection technologies

Lena Gorgannezhad, Nam-Trung Nguyen, Muhammad J. A. Shiddiky et al.

Paper

Dynamic CTC phenotypes in metastatic prostate cancer models visualized using magnetic ranking cytometry

Leyla Kermanshah, Shana O. Kelley et al.

Paper

An ultrasensitive test for profiling circulating tumor DNA using integrated comprehensive droplet digital detection

Chen-Yin Ou, Timothy J. Abram, Weian Zhao et al.

Paper

Cancer marker-free enrichment and direct mutation detection in rare cancer cells by combining multi-property isolation and microfluidic concentration

Soo Hyeon Kim, Teruo Fujii et al.

Paper

Urine-based liquid biopsy: non-invasive and sensitive AR-V7 detection in urinary EVs from patients with prostate cancer

Hyun-Kyung Woo, Hong Koo Ha, Yoon-Kyoung Cho et al.

 

Lab on a Chip is the leading journal publishing significant and original work related to miniaturisation, at the micro- and nano-scale, of interest to a multidisciplinary readership with an Journal Impact Factor of 5.995**. The journal is guided by Editor-in-Chief Abraham (Abe) Lee (University of California, Irvine) who is supported by our team of Associate Editors (Yoon-Kyoung Cho, Petra Dittrich, Hang Lu, Jianhua Qin, Manabu Tokeshi, Joel Voldman and Aaron Wheeler).

We hope you enjoy reading the papers within this Thematic Collection!

Keep up to date with Lab on a Chip throughout the year by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

Dolomite/Lab on a Chip Pioneers of Miniaturization Lectureshipdeadline approaching-nominate a colleague now!

Organ-on a-chip systems- translating concept into practice thematic collectionSubmit now

Organ-,body- and disease-on-a-chip thematic collectionRead now

Droplet-based single-cell sequencingRead now

Lab on a Chip Emerging Investigator Series Apply now

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What we know about cancer tumors

Cancer tumors are a lot more complex than we think: besides cancer cells, supportive tissue cells, fat, and even immune cells can be found in a tumor. Combined crosstalk in between these cell groups influences the way the tumor develops or responses to drug treatment. On the other hand, the majority of what we know about cancer tumors has been acquired by studying cell ensembles. Recent strides to improve our understanding of cancer revealed that we have long been missing the stochastic interactions and rare events due to ensemble-average measurements. We can unveil how these cell groups work together and how the rare events change the fate of a tumor thanks to single-cell analysis techniques.

Single cells can be identified by extrinsic and intrinsic markers. Extrinsic markers are definitive of genetic and proteomic states of a cell. Flow cytometry and mass spectrometry have been the workhorse of extrinsic marker analysis, where genetic or proteomic materials are often fluorescently labeled for detection. With these techniques, multiplexed analysis of thousands of cells can be employed simultaneously. Intrinsic markers include size, shape, density, optical, mechanical, and electrical properties which do not require labelling. Microfluidic techniques provide with a plethora of different functionalities to sort the cells based on intrinsic markers. Combination of both extrinsic and intrinsic data advances our understanding of how cell heterogeneity is reflected in cell-to-cell variations in tumor development and drug-response. Although many powerful methods are available for determining extrinsic markers, not many techniques can gather information about a panel of different intrinsic markers.

A recent study from Biological Microtechnology and BioMEMS group at MIT represents an important microfluidic approach for the development of multiparameter intrinsic cytometry tool. The approach includes several different microfluidic modules combined with microscope imaging and image processing by machine learning. Separate modules measuring cell size, deformability, and polarization can be combined and organized within the tool (Figure 1). (i) Size module detects the cell size optically in a flow through system. Cell size module is necessary to separate different cell types that can give important cues about disease state. (ii) In deformability module, cells pass through narrow channels, and their transit time defines the deformability. Cell deformability gives cues about cytoskeletal and nuclear changes associated with cancer progression. (iii) In the polarization module, dielectrophoretic force at a fixed frequency is applied on cells driven by opposing hydrodynamic forces. Cells approach coplanar electrodes with different equilibrium positions depending on their polarizability. Cell polarizability allows for distinguishing subtle changes in biological phenotypes. As a proof-of-concept work, drug-induced structural changes in cells were detected for the first time using five different intrinsic markers, including size, deformability, and polarizability at three frequencies. The authors indicate that this powerful tool can further be equipped with visual readout capabilities, such as deterministic lateral displacement array, inertial microfluidics, acoustophoresis, optical techniques.

Figure 1. Multiparameter intrinsic cytometry combines different microfluidic modules on one substrate along with cell tracking to correlate per-cell information across modules for different intrinsic properties including size, polarizability, and deformability.

 

To download the full article for free* click the link below:

Multiparameter cell-tracking intrinsic cytometry for single-cell characterization
Apichitsopa, A. Jaffe, and J. Voldman
Lab Chip, 2018, Lab on a Chip Recent Hot Articles
DOI: 10.1039/C8LC00240A

*Article free to read until 31st August 2018

About the Webwriter

Burcu Gumuscu is a postdoctoral fellow in Herr Lab at UC Berkeley in the United States. Her research interests include development of microfluidic devices for quantitative analysis of proteins from single-cells, next generation sequencing,compartmentalized organ-on-chip studies, and desalination of water on the microscale.

 

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Magnetic separation of circulating tumor cells…but it’s not what you think

Cancers typically originate in one organ yet can spread to distant regions of the body forming secondary tumours called metastases. This happens as cells from the primary tumour migrate into the circulatory system and then travel to other organs. These cells, which are a very rare population within the circulatory system, are termed circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Because of their role in cancer biology, they have garnered a lot of interest lately. Their detection and isolation present several analytical challenges. For one, they are the proverbial “needle in a haystack”, with counts on the order of one CTC for every billion blood cells. This has traditionally led to a paradox: these rare cells are best handled in microscale systems but the world-to-chip mismatch limits microfluidic devices from rapidly processing the large (> 5 mL) samples necessary. Second, recent studies have revealed CTCs to be very heterogeneous populations, limiting the use of surface markers for labelling and capturing a broad range of CTCs. Because there is much still to learn about CTCs, there’s also an interest in recovering viable CTCs for further analysis. In their recent report, Zhao et al. demonstrate a microfluidic device capable of enriching CTCs using magnetic separation. But it’s not that typical magnetophoretic separations you may be familiar with!

Magnetic separation of circulating tumor cells - nanoparticles

Rather than using magnetic particles to bind to surface antigens and eventually separate out CTCs, they capitalize on a phenomenon known as “negative magnetophoresis”. Cells are suspended within a uniformly magnetic medium and application of a non-uniform magnetic field results in a magnetic buoyant force. (This is akin to how negative dielectrophoresis exerts a force on particles in a non-uniform electric field.) The advantage of this method is that the “working principle applies to every non-magnetic material,” according to Prof. Leidong Mao. “Naturally,” he thought “it could apply to CTC enrichment.” However, despite previous work separating different cell populations with negative magnetophoresis, moving to CTC enrichment is not so straightforward. CTC enrichment is the most challenging separation. “All previous applications in our group are with cells at high concentrations,” mentioned Prof. Mao. The main challenge in developing the chip was trying to preserve the characteristics of an “ideal” CTC enrichment device; one that could process a significant amount of blood quickly, have a high recovery rate of CTCs, give reasonable purity of isolated CTCs, and retain cell integrity and viability for further analysis.

With this method, heterogeneous populations of CTCs can be enriched as selection is size dependent rather than based on expression of certain surface markers. This also avoids the costs associated with traditional magnetic labelling – typically used to label and deplete the millions of white blood cells. The device is capable of working at flow rates of 5-7 mL/hr, which is what is necessary to process an entire blood sample and can achieve high recovery rates (>90%). While the authors report purities that appear low (10-12%), they are working on improving purity. One strategy they suggest in their report is to follow the route of the iChip and combine size based separations with magnetic WBC depletion.

To read the full paper for free*, click the link below:

Label-free ferrohydrodynamic cell separation of circulating tumor cells
DOI: 10.1039/C7LC00680B (Paper) Lab Chip, 2017, 17, 3097-3111

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About the Webwriter

Darius Rackus is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Toronto working in the Wheeler Lab. His research interests are in combining sensors with digital microfluidics for healthcare applications.

*free to access until 14th December 2017

 

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ICAS 2017 – International Congress on Analytical Sciences

ICAS 2017 is the 5 yearly international congress organised by the Chinese Chemical Society (CCS) and the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). The event takes place at the Hainan International Convention and Exhibition Centre in Hainan, China between 5th and 8th May 2017. The theme of this year’s congress is “Analytical Chemistry – From Tool to Science”, which will contain sessions on advanced instrumental analysis, nanoscience and nanotechnology, biological and bioanalysis, environmental sciences, food safety, micro-analysis and microfluidic, sensors systems, mass spectrometry, separation and chromatography, spectrometry/spectroscopy, and electrochemical analysis. The Royal Society of Chemistry Journals Lab on a Chip, Analyst and Analytical Methods are very pleased to be supporting this event.

Visit the conference website for further details on themes and speakers and to submit your abstract.

Important Dates:
Abstract Submission Deadline: 28th February 2017

Early Bird Registration Deadline: 31st March 2017

 Register now to attend and present your work!

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A new ‘on-chip’ immunoassay device

Professor Yarmash‘s lab at Rutgers University have developed a proof of concept microfluidic device, capable of running multiple immunoassays in parallel. The device allows 32 samples to be assayed simultaneously and multiple analytes can be tested in each sample.

As shown in the diagram below, each sample inlet has a bead trap that contains antibody-conjugated microbeads. These are commercially available, allowing virtually any analyte to be tested. The sample flows over the beads at an optimised rate, allowing the analytes to bind to their specific antibodies. A secondary antibody is added that binds to antibodies complexed to analytes, followed by a fluorescent tag that binds to the secondary antibody. The microbeads are then collected, placed in a 96 well plate, and analysed.

a) diagram and b) photo of the device; c) diagram of valve configuration and flow pathways during the assay; d) key steps in assay.

Device layout and assay principle

The authors assayed several proteins from an in vitro supernatant and their results corroborated well with a standard benchtop immunoassay. Compared to the benchtop standard, the device has significantly reduced sample consumption as well as large reductions in microbead and detection antibody consumption. It has comparable sensitivity to the benchtop standard and has a large working range, meaning that analytes present at different concentrations in the sample can be measured simultaneously. In addition to this, it is compatible with commercial reagents and analyte concentration can be quantified. Although previously published devices have addressed some of these characteristics, this the first example where they are combined into one device.

Moving on from their proof-of-concept study, the Yarmash group hopes to develop a device capable of in vivo measurements. One example they give is analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in rats, an important animal model in Alzheimer’s research, where immunoassays are currently limited by the small volumes available.


To download the full article for free* click the link below:

Development and validation of a microfluidic immunoassay capable of multiplexing parallel samples in microliter volumes
Mehdi Ghodbane, Elizabeth C. Stucky, Tim J. Maguire, Rene S. Schloss, David I. Shreiber, Jeffrey D. Zahn and Martin L. Yarmush
Lab Chip
, 2015,15, 3211-3221
DOI:
10.1039/C5LC00398A

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About the webwriter

Claire Weston is a PhD student in the Fuchter Group, at Imperial College London. Her work is focused on developing novel photoswitches and photoswitchable inhibitors.

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*Access is free until 19/11/2015 through a registered RSC account – click here to register

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New YouTube Videos

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Top 10 most accessed Lab on a Chip articles in June 2015

In June 2015, our most downloaded Lab on a Chip articles were:

Shia-Yen Teh, Robert Lin, Lung-Hsin Hung and Abraham P. Lee
DOI: 10.1039/B715524G

Ali Kemal Yetisen, Muhammad Safwan Akram and Christopher R. Lowe
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC50169H

Russell H. Cole, Niek de Lange, Zev J. Gartner and Adam R. Abate
DOI: 10.1039/C5LC00333D

Ching-Hui Lin, Yi-Hsing Hsiao, Hao-Chen Chang, Chuan-Feng Yeh, Cheng-Kun He, Eric M. Salm, Chihchen Chen, Ing-Ming Chiu and Chia-Hsien Hsu
DOI: 10.1039/C5LC00541H

Friedrich Schuler, Frank Schwemmer, Martin Trotter, Simon Wadle, Roland Zengerle, Felix von Stetten and Nils Paust
DOI: 10.1039/C5LC00291E

Mei He, Jennifer Crow, Marc Roth, Yong Zeng and Andrew K. Godwin
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00662C

Joost F. Swennenhuis, Arjan G. J. Tibbe, Michiel Stevens, Madhumohan R. Katika, Joost van Dalum, Hien Duy Tong, Cees J. M. van Rijn and Leon W. M. M. Terstappen
DOI: 10.1039/C5LC00304K

A. Liga, A. D. B. Vliegenthart, W. Oosthuyzen, J. W. Dear and M. Kersaudy-Kerhoas
DOI: 10.1039/C5LC00240K

A. Wasay and D. Sameoto
DOI: 10.1039/C5LC00342C

Ivo Leibacher, Peter Reichert and Jürg Dual
DOI: 10.1039/C5LC00083A

Interesting read? Let us know your thoughts below.

And remember, you can submit directly to Lab on a Chip!

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New YouTube Videos

Multiplexed Paper Analytical Device for Measuring Airborne Metal Particulates with Distance-Based Detection 


 
  
 
Transportation, Dispersion and Ordering of Dense Colloidal Assemblies by Magnetic Interfacial Rotaphoresis 


 
   
Gecko Gaskets for Self-Sealing and High Strength Reversible Bonding of Microfluidics 

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