Archive for October, 2014

Lectureship presented to Sangeeta Bhatia

Congratulations to Dr. Sangeeta N. Bhatia, winner of  the 2014 Corning Inc./Lab on a Chip Pioneers of Miniaturisation Lectureship.


The picture shows Lab on a Chip Executive Editor, Harpal Minhas (Left) and Director of Polymer processing in Organic & Biochemical Technologies, Science & Technology at Corning Incorporated, Ed Fewkes (right) presenting Sangeeta (middle) with her award earlier this week at the µTAS 2014 Conference.

The 9th ‘Pioneers of Ministurisation‘ Lectureship, is for extraordinary or outstanding contributions to the understanding or development of miniaturised systems and was presented to Dr Bhatia at the µTAS 2014 Conference in San Antonio, Texas in October 2014. Dr Bhatia received a certificate, $5000 and gave a short lecture at the conference. Further information, including past winners, can be viewed on our homepage.

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September’s HOT Free Articles

These HOT articles, published in September 2014 were recommended by our referees and are free* to access for 4 weeks

1000-fold sample focusing on paper-based microfluidic devices
Tally Rosenfeld and Moran Bercovici
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 4465-4474
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00734D

A reliable and programmable acoustofluidic pump powered by oscillating sharp-edge structures
Po-Hsun Huang, Nitesh Nama, Zhangming Mao, Peng Li, Joseph Rufo, Yuchao Chen, Yuliang Xie, Cheng-Hsin Wei, Lin Wang and Tony Jun Huang
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 4319-4323
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00806E

Application of an acoustofluidic perfusion bioreactor for cartilage tissue engineering
Siwei Li, Peter Glynne-Jones, Orestis G. Andriotis, Kuan Y. Ching, Umesh S. Jonnalagadda, Richard O. C. Oreffo, Martyn Hill and Rahul S. Tare
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 4475-4485
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00956H


Take a look at our Lab on a Chip 2014 HOT Articles Collection!

*Access is free until 28.11.14 through a publishing personal account. It’s quick, easy and free to register!

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New YouTube Videos

ElectroTaxis-on-a-Chip (ETC): an Integrated Quantitative High-throughput Screening Platform for Electrical Field-Directed Cell Migration 

 
 
  
 
A 3D-Printed Microcapillary Assembly for Facile Double Emulsion Generation 

 
  
 
 
The pumping lid: Investigating multi-material 3D printing for equipment-free, programmable generation of positive and negative pressures for microfluidic applications 

 
   
 
Chip-off-the-old-rock: The study of reservoir-relevant geological processes with real-rock micromodels 

 
 
  
 
Self-powered Imbibing Microfluidic Pump by Liquid Encapsulation: SIMPLE  

 
 
  
 
Controlled Incremental Filtration:  A simplified approach to design and fabrication of high-throughput microfluidic devices for selective enrichment of particles 

 
 
  
Pressure Stabilizer for Reproducible Picoinjection in Droplet-based Microfluidic Systems 

 
 
  
 

Ultra-rapid prototyping of flexible, multi-layered microfluidic devices via razor writing 

 
 
  
Manipulating and quantifying temperature-triggered coalescence by microcentrifugation 
 

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Oil reserves put under the microscope with new lab-on-a-rock

The microfluidic model is etched into a calcite crystal

Scientists in Canada have developed a new microfluidic model carved from rock, which can replicate the conditions found in underground oil reservoirs in a laboratory with more accuracy than ever before. Using it to study the processes that occur in these reservoirs could lead to greater oil yields.

David Sinton’s group, at the University of Toronto, hope that the model they’ve developed will allow them to properly study the rock structure, and see how it’s affected by oil extraction techniques. The techniques could then be optimised to make them much more efficient.

To read the full article please visit ChemistryWorld.

Chip-off-the-old-rock: the study of reservoir-relevant geological processes with real-rock micromodels*
Wen Song, Thomas W. de Haas, Hossein Fadaei and David Sinto.
Lab Chip
, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00608A

*Access is free through a registered RSC account until 13 November 2014 – click here to register

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