Archive for February, 2014

Tiny islands set sperm spinning

A platform for simultaneously screening thousands of sperm cells could lead to more efficient identification of high performing sperm for fertility treatments.

Protein islands trap individual sperm cells for motility analysis

 Assisted reproductive technologies have revolutionised the fertility world, however, sperm must be carefully picked on the basis of specific characteristics, including motility, to increase the chance of a successful pregnancy. However, more than half of the sperm selected for intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) using current procedures are damaged.

To read the full article, please go to Chemistry World.

Make it Spin: Individual Trapping of Sperm for Analysis and Recovery Using Micro-Contact Printing
Jean-Philippe Frimat, Mathijs Bronkhorst, Bjorn de Wagenaar, Johan Bomer, Ferdi van der Heijden, Albert van den Berg and Loes Segerink  
Lab Chip, 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00050A, Paper

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New YouTube videos:

View the new videos on the Lab on a Chip YouTube site using the links below:
 

Inkjet patterned superhydrophobic paper for open-air surface microfluidic devices 


 
 
 The LabTube – A novel microfluidic platform for assay automation in laboratory centrifuges 


 
   
 Make it Spin: Individual Trapping of Sperm for Analysis and Recovery Using Micro-Contact Printing 


 
   
 One-step surface modification for irreversible bonding of various plastics with poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomer at room temperature

 
 
   
 Controlling uniformity of photopolymerized microscopic hydrogels

 
 
 
 Plant-Chip for High-Throughput Phenotyping of Arabidopsis 


 
 
 Trapping Self-Propelled Micromotors with Microfabricated Chevron and Heart-Shaped Chips 


 
   
Large scale arrays of tunable microlenses 


 
  
Dynamic Trapping and Two-Dimensional Transport of Swimming Microorganisms Using a Rotating Magnetic Micro-Robot 


 
 
Functional microengineered model of the human splenon-on-a-chip

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Free access to HOT articles!

These HOT articles were recommended by our referees and are free to access for 4 weeks*

Electrostatic potential wells for on-demand drop manipulation in microchannels
Riëlle de Ruiter, Arjen M. Pit, Vitor Martins de Oliveira, Michèl H. G. Duits, Dirk van den Ende and Frieder Mugele  
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 883-891
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC51121A, Paper

Paper-based microfluidics with high resolution, cut on a glass fiber membrane for bioassays
Xueen Fang, Shasha Wei and Jilie Kong  
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 911-915
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC51246K, Paper

The regulation of mobile medical applications
Ali Kemal Yetisen, J. L. Martinez-Hurtado, Fernando da Cruz Vasconcellos, M. C. Emre Simsekler, Muhammad Safwan Akram and Christopher R. Lowe  
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 833-840
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC51235E, Focus 

An automated integrated platform for rapid and sensitive multiplexed protein profiling using human saliva samples
Shuai Nie, W. Hampton Henley, Scott E. Miller, Huaibin Zhang, Kathryn M. Mayer, Patty J. Dennis, Emily A. Oblath, Jean Pierre Alarie, Yue Wu, Frank G. Oppenheim, Frédéric F. Little, Ahmet Z. Uluer, Peidong Wang, J. Michael Ramsey and David R. Walt  
Lab Chip, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC51303C, Paper

A lab-on-chip cell-based biosensor for label-free sensing of water toxicants
F. Liu, A. N. Nordin, F. Li and I. Voiculescu  
Lab Chip, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC51085A, Paper

*Free access to individuals is provided through an RSC Publishing personal account. It’s quick, easy and more importantly – free – to register!

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New Youtube Videos

View the new videos on the Lab on a Chip YouTube site using the links below:

 

Rapid Selection of Sperm with High DNA Integrity 
 


 

Standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based microfluidic cytometer 


 
 

Mechanical Decision Trees for Investigating and Modulating Single-Cell Cancer Invasion Dynamics 


 
 
On-demand, Competing Gradient Arrays for Neutrophil Chemotaxis


 
 
Cooperative roles of biological flow and surface topography in guiding sperm migration revealed by a microfluidic model 


 
 
Dynamically reconfigurable Fibre Optical Spanner 


 
 
Direct measurement of the differential pressure during drop formation in a co-flow microfluidic device 


 
 
A microfluidic photobioreactor array demonstrating high-throughput screening for microalgal oil production


 
 
Particle tracking by full-field complex wavefront subtraction in digital holography microscopy 


 
 
Iontronic Microdroplet Array for Flexible Ultrasensitive Tactile Sensing

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A microfluidic chip for safekeeping

To accurately diagnose a disease or monitor the effectiveness of a treatment, patient samples (e.g. blood, saliva, or urine) must be analyzed in a central laboratory. After collection, the samples will begin to degrade due to chemical, bacterial, and enzymatic interactions.1 These changes can compromise the integrity of the analyte and introduce errors during analysis. Thus, stabilization techniques are necessary to preserve the diagnostic value of patient samples.

Typically, analyte stabilization is achieved by transporting and storing samples at low temperature using dry ice, refrigerators, freezers, or liquid nitrogen. Unfortunately, low-temperature preservation is costly to implement, requiring substantial infrastructure, specialized equipment, and trained personnel. It becomes particularly expensive for applications involving bio surveillance, long-term sample archiving, and clinical diagnostics in low-resource settings.

To address this challenge, a research team, led by Prof. Ismagilov at the California Institute of Technology, developed a microfluidic device that can preserve biological samples in the dry state. The device relies on pre-loaded desiccants to rapidly (~30 min) dry samples in a stabilization matrix, protecting the analyte from enzymatic degradation and light or heat activated reactions.2 Importantly, the device is simple to use, allowing minimally trained users to collect and preserve samples without worrying about the precision of the input volume.

The device, based on SlipChip technology,3 was formed by stacking three layers of subassemblies: the top layer has through-holes for sample loading and recovery, the middle layer has channels for sample storage, and the bottom layer houses the desiccants for drying. With the help of a lubricant between each layer, the middle layer can be horizontally moved (slipped), relative to the other layers, allowing the device to be reconfigured into different states.

The device has three states, each with a specific function: loading, drying, and recovery (see figure 1). In the loading state, the loading inlet is connected to the sample storage channel.  An untrained user will place the sample in the inlet and close the lid to create a tight seal. This generates an air pressure that pushes the sample through the channels. To initiate the preservation process, the user will slip the device into the drying state. Here, the sample is disconnected from the inlet and is placed into vapor contact with the desiccant through a porous membrane. At this stage, the device can be stored or transported without the use of low-temperature preservation equipment. Just before analysis in the laboratory, a trained user will use a special tool to slip the device into the recovery state. Here, the sample is disconnected from the desiccant chamber and is connected to the recovery inlets. Using a pipette and water, the samples can be rehydrated and recovered for quantitative analysis.

As a validation, the device was subjected to an accelerated aging test (50oC for 5-weeks) while preserving samples containing control RNA or HIV-1 RNA. Remarkably, the RNA samples stored in the device were indistinguishable from the ones stored in the freezer at -80oC, as tested by electrophoresis and RT-qPCR. In contrast, significant degradation was observed in samples stored in the liquid state at 50oC. These results suggest that the RNA may be stable at room temperature in the device for at least up to 8 months.

In summary, the research team developed and validated a microfluidic device that can preserve biological samples in the dry state, eliminating the need for low-temperature equipment. The device is compact, easy to use, making it compatible for challenging applications such as clinical diagnostics in remote, resource-limited settings. The reduction of cost in transport, sample collection, and storage can open up many new possibilities in health care, diagnostics, and beyond.

To access the full article, click the following link: A microfluidic device for dry sample preservation in remote setting, Stefano Begolo, Feng Shen and Rustem F. Ismagilov.

1.            G. V. Iyengar, K. S. Subramanian and J. R. W. Woittiez, Element Analysis of Biological Samples: Principles and Practice, CRC Press, Boca Raton, New York, 1998.

2.            E. Wan, M. Akana, J. Pons, J. Chen, S. Musone, P. Y. Kwok and W. Liao, Current Issues in Molecular Biology, 2010, 12, 135-142.

3.            W. Du, L. Li, K. P. Nichols and R. F. Ismagilov, Lab on a Chip, 2009, 9, 2286-2292.

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New YouTube videos

View the new videos on the Lab on a Chip YouTube site using the links below:

A Novel Surgery-like Strategy for Droplet Coalescence in Microchannels 


 
 

Real-time image processing for label-free enrichment of <i>Actinobacteria</i> cultivated in picolitre droplets 


 
 
Inkjet patterned superhydrophobic paper for open-air surface microfluidic devices 


 
 
Plant-Chip for High-Throughput Phenotyping of Arabidopsis 


 
 
Single Cell Swimming Dynamics of Listeria monocytogenes Using a Nanoporous Microfluidic Platform 


 
 
Continuous flow micro-bioreactors for the production of biopharmaceuticals: effect of geometry, surface texture, and flow rate 


 
 
Ultra small droplet generation via volatile component evaporation 


 
 
USB-Driven Microfluidic Chips on Printed Circuit Board 


 
 
Paper-based microfluidics with high resolution  cutted on a glass fiber membrane for bioassays 


 
 
Microfluidic acoustophoretic force based low-concentration oil separation and detection from environment

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Top ten most accessed LOC articles in Q4 2013

During the months October – December, the following articles are in the Top Ten most accessed:-

Paper-based microfluidic point-of-care diagnostic devices 
Ali Kemal Yetisen, Muhammad Safwan Akram and Christopher R. Lowe    
Lab Chip, 2013,13, 2210-2251 
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC50169H    

Ultrahigh-throughput sorting of microfluidic drops with flow cytometry 
Shaun W. Lim and Adam R. Abate    
Lab Chip, 2013,13, 4563-4572 
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC50736J     

Droplet microfluidics 
Shia-Yen Teh, Robert Lin, Lung-Hsin Hung and Abraham P. Lee    
Lab Chip, 2008,8, 198-220 
DOI: 10.1039/B715524G     

Technologies for detection of circulating tumor cells: facts and vision 
Catherine Alix-Panabières and Klaus Pantel    
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 57-62 
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC50644D     

PDMS lab-on-a-chip fabrication using 3D printed templates 
Wenming Liu, Li Li, Jian-chun Wang, Qin Tu, Li Ren, Yaolei Wang and Jinyi Wang    
Lab Chip, 2012,12, 1702-1709 
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC00034B     

Capture, release and culture of circulating tumor cells from pancreatic cancer patients using an enhanced mixing chip
Weian Sheng, Olorunseun O. Ogunwobi, Tao Chen, Jinling Zhang, Thomas J. George, Chen Liu and Z. Hugh Fan  
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 89-98
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC51017D, Paper 
 
A programmable and reconfigurable microfluidic chip 
Raphael Renaudot, Vincent Agache, Yves Fouillet, Guillaume Laffite, Emilie Bisceglia, Laurent Jalabert, Momoko Kumemura, Dominique Collard and Hiroyuki Fujita    
Lab Chip, 2013,13, 4517-4524 
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC50850A     

Smartphone quantifies Salmonella from paper microfluidics 
Tu San Park, Wenyue Li, Katherine E. McCracken and Jeong-Yeol Yoon    
Lab Chip, 2013,13, 4832-4840 
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC50976A     

Ultrasensitive protein detection: a case for microfluidic magnetic bead-based assays 
H. Cumhur Tekin and Martin A. M. Gijs    
Lab Chip, 2013,13, 4711-4739 
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC50477H     

Static microdroplet arrays: a microfluidic device for droplet trapping, incubation and release for enzymatic and cell-based assays 
Ansgar Huebner, Dan Bratton, Graeme Whyte, Min Yang, Andrew J. deMello, Chris Abell and Florian Hollfelder    
Lab Chip, 2009,9, 692-698 
DOI: 10.1039/B813709A     

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Lab on a Chip? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us  your suggestions.

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Emerging Technologies Competition 2014

The Royal Society of Chemistry is holding a competition to identify the latest technologies in chemical sciences which have significant potential impact on the UK economy.

The winner will receive one to one mentoring from renowned multinational companies and up to a £10,000 cash prize.

If you have an emerging technology that could be the next big chemical science revolution, submit your application by 1 March 2014!

Follow the link to find out more: http://rsc.li/LGCAwM


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