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FOMMS Prize Winners

Congratulations to the Poster Prize Winners at FOMMS 2015: Molecular Modeling and the Materials Genome which took place from 12th – 16th July 2015 in Oregon, USA.

Recipients of the poster prizes which were jointly sponsored by our Journals: PCCP, Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B and C and Materials Horizons, were: Rebecca Lindsey (University of Minnesota), Kayla Sprenger (University of Washington) and Brian Barnes (US Army Research Laboratory).

FOMMS 2015 was the 6th triennial FOMMS conference showcasing computational quantum chemistry, molecular science, and engineering simulation.  The theme of the 2015 meeting was Molecular Modeling and the Materials Genome and was chaired by Professor Randy Snurr (Northwestern University)

Further information regarding FOMMS 2015 can be found here.

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2015 Journal of Materials Chemistry Lectureship – Nominations now open!

Now in its 6th year, we are looking for nominations from you for the next Journal of Materials Chemistry Lectureship recipient.

We are pleased to announce that the 2015 Lectureship is now open for nominations. This annual lectureship honours a younger scientist who has made a significant contribution to the field of materials chemistry.

Henry Snaith, the winner of the 2014 lectureship, was chosen as last year’s recipient by the Journal of Materials Chemistry Executive Editorial Board.

Qualification
To be eligible for the Journal of Materials Chemistry Lectureship, the candidate should be in the earlier stages of their scientific career, typically within 10 years of attaining their doctorate or equivalent degree, and will have made a significant contribution to the field.

Description
The recipient of the award will get to present a Journal of Materials Chemistry lecture at the 1st Materials Horizons International Conference (MH1) in Beijing, China, 8-10 April 2016. The Journal of Materials Chemistry Editorial Office will provide the sum of £1000 to the recipient for travel and accommodation costs, and will present the winner with the award at this lecture. The award recipient will also be asked to contribute a lead article to the journal and will have their work showcased on the back cover of the issue in which their article is published.

Selection
The recipient of the lectureship will be selected and endorsed by the Journal of Materials Chemistry’s prestigious Executive Editorial Board.

Nominations
Those wishing to make a nomination should send details of the nominee including a brief C.V. (no longer than 2 pages) together with a letter supporting the nomination (no longer than 2 pages), to the Journal of Materials Chemistry Editorial Office by 18th September 2015. Please note that self-nomination is permitted.

Send a nomination here today: materials-rsc@rsc.org

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Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B and C impact factors

We are delighted to announce that Journal of Materials Chemistry ABC have received their first impact factors in the 2014 Journal Citation Reports®.

Journal of Materials Chemistry A – 7.443
Journal of Materials Chemistry B – 4.726
Journal of Materials Chemistry C – 4.696

We would like to thank our authors, referees, and Editorial and Advisory Board members for all of their contributions to the success of the Journal of Materials Chemistry family.

Submit your next high impact paper to Journal of Materials Chemistry AB or C and enjoy all of the benefits of being a Royal Society of Chemistry author!

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A highly novel class of luminescent material

Despite the wordy and jargon laden title this paper by Wang et al presents interesting work on a highly novel class of luminescent material.

It is generally understood that when chromophores aggregate their emission is quenched, an event know as aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ). The main problem with this ACQ occurring is that it limits the use of these luminescent molecules in applications such as bio-imaging and sensors where brightness is key.

In response to this many research groups have focused on developing materials that are the exact opposite of ACG’s and where aggregation of the chromophores will actually promote luminescence. This phenomenon is referred to as aggregation-induced emission (AIE).

This paper presents work about a novel type of AIE material that overcomes the shortfalls of ACG and some other previous AIE luminogens. A red-emissive barbituic acid-functionalized TPE derivative (TPE-HPh-Bar) was designed and synthesized, the resulting material exhibits both AIE and also twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT). By altering the method of synthesis the TPE-HPh-Bar is capable of self-assembling into nanospheres, -rods and -tubes. All of these exciting characteristics indicate that this novel material could be used in a wide range of applications from biological imaging to optoelectronic nano-devices in the future.

Twisted intramolecular charge transfer, aggregation-induced emission, supramolecular self-assembly and the optical waveguide of barbituic acid-functionalized tetraphenylethene
Erjing Wang, Jacky W. Y. Lam, Rongrong Hu, Chuang Zhang, Yong Sheng Zhao and Ben Zhong Tang
J. Mater. Chem. C, 2014, 2, 1801-1807. C3TC32161D

H. L. Parker is a guest web writer for the Journal of Materials Chemistry blog. She currently works at the Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence, the University of York.

To keep up-to-date with all the latest research, sign-up to our RSS feed or Table of contents alert.

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“Fingerprinting” chemical contaminants using light?? Awesome!!

“What? Why? How?” All kinds of “wh” questions I bombarded at my buddy Marc when he apprised me that he is not going to make it to the long awaited trip. “Somebody tried to poison me” followed by guffaw was the jocular repartee from Marc. After a demented pause from my side, Marc cleared the air of confusion and sickeningly reported that he is suffering from food poisoning. The next morning I drove down to his place to see how he is doing. In one of the friendly banters which we always indulge into, he said” Non sense, this food poisoning man, I wish I could have some device like a phone which can detect the contaminants in food right away, so that I can make store owner eat that food once I find it’s contaminated” followed by burst of  laughter. “Typical Marc” I muttered with smirk. But on my way back home that ‘device’ thought of Marc’s stuck in my head and being a chemist I started screening all the techniques used for the detecting chemicals and asked myself which technique can be exploited to make such a handy device to detect chemical contaminants. The answer came without a waste of second, its Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering(SERS)!

(more…)

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Working out outside?.. check the humidity level first..!!!

The audience at Arthur Ashe Arena at Flushing Meadows were on their feet with a huge round of applause after the scintillating first set of tennis between Shui Peng and Caroline Wosniacki at the US Open 2014, one of the biggest and most renowned stages for tennis championships. It was 82F(29 oC) out there with grueling conditions for playing. One of the finest tennis contests was being produced until suddenly Shui was struck by cramp in her left leg which is a symptom of  many heat related illnesses. After 10 minutes of  high drama in the presence of nearly 20000 tennis frenzied crowds, Shaui Peng had to retire after several futile attempts to pursue her quest for the US open title. Multiple events of this sort have  prevailed in the history of the sports, also cases where athletes have withdrawn from competitions because of grueling weather forecasts are omnipresent . Being a sport enthusiast, I was forced to wonder, is it just temperature that is a culprit for heat illness or there is something else as a “partner in crime”?!

(more…)

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Take 1…minute for chemistry in health

Can you explain the importance of chemistry to human health in just 1 minute? If you’re an early-career researcher who is up to the challenge, making a 1 minute video could win you £500.

The chemical sciences will be fundamental in helping us meet the healthcare challenges of the future, and we are committed to ensuring that they contribute to their full potential. As part of our work in this area, we are inviting undergraduate and PhD students, post-docs and those starting out their career in industry to produce an original video that demonstrates the importance of chemistry in health.

We are looking for imaginative ways of showcasing how chemistry helps us address healthcare challenges. Your video should be no longer than 1 minute, and you can use any approach you like.

The winner will receive a £500 cash prize, with a £250 prize for second place and £150 prize for third place up for grabs too.

Stuck for inspiration? Last year’s winning video is a good place to start. John Gleeson’s video was selected based on the effective use of language, dynamic style, creativity and its accurate content.

The closing date for entries to be submitted is 30 January 2015. Our judging panel will select the top five videos. We will then publish the shortlisted videos online and open the judging to the public to determine the winner and the runners up.

For more details on how to enter the competition and who is eligible, join us at the Take 1… page.

Good luck!

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Poster Prize winners at the Excitonic Photovoltaics (XPV) 2014 conference

(From top to bottom) 1st, 2nd & 3rd placed prize winners: Hilary Marsh, Ivan Kassel and Xiaodan Gu receiving their poster prizes from Peter Skabara

(From top to bottom) 1st, 2nd & 3rd placed prize winners: Hilary Marsh, Ivan Kassel and Xiaodan Gu receiving their poster prizes from Peter Skabara

Journal of Materials Chemistry C are delighted to announce the Poster prize winners at the XPV 2014 conference which took place at Telluride Science Research Center, Colorado, USA from the 12th – 15th August this year.

The conference brought together leading researchers in the field of excitonic solar cells with the intention of generating discussions of the global energy outlook and the potential impact of emerging exciton-based PV technologies. Topics discussed during the four-day conference included: materials design, synthesis, and growth; combinatorial materials development (both experimental and computational); photophysics and exciton dynamics; charge generation, transport, and recombination studies; models of device physics; interface and electrode optimization; multijunction device architectures; and novel photophysical mechanisms such as singlet fission.

JMC C poster prize winners from left to right: Ivan Kassel, Xiaodan Gu and Hilary Marsh

Journal of Materials Chemistry C poster prize winners from left to right: Ivan Kassel, Xiaodan Gu and Hilary Marsh

The posters were ranked by the invited speakers with the following 1st, 2nd and 3rd place prizes being awarded to: Hilary Marsh (University of Colorado, Boulder), Ivan Kassal (University of Queensland) and Xiaodan Gu (Stanford University).

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Recycled fish bones offer five star sun protection

An effective new sunscreen based on iron-doped hydroxyapatite (HAp)-based materials derived from cod fish bones, a by-product of the food industry, has been developed by scientists in Portugal.

Fish bones could be converted into a valuable product © iStock

Fish bones could be converted into a valuable product © iStock

Commercial sunscreens are usually based on materials like TiO2 and ZnO, which absorb UV to reduce its harmful effects on the skin. However, there are concerns regarding the potential toxicity of these materials and their adverse environmental effects when they accumulate in water supplies.

Interested? Read the full article at Chemistry World.

The original article can be read below:

Hydroxyapatite-Fe2O3 based material of natural origin as an active sunscreen filter
Clara Piccirillo, Catarina Rocha, David M Tobaldi, Robert Carlyle Pullar, Joao Antonio Labrincha, Marta Ferreira, Paula Castro and Manuela Pintado  
J. Mater. Chem. B, 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4TB00984C

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Superelastic battery

Lithium ion batteries that can be stretched by 600% have been unveiled by scientists in China. In the future, the fibre shaped batteries could be woven into textiles to satisfy the ever-growing requirement for wearable devices.

Huisheng Peng and colleagues at Fudan University made the superelastic batteries by winding two carbon nanotubes–lithium oxide composites yarns, which served as the positive and negative electrodes, onto an elastomer substrate and covering this with a layer of gel electrolyte. The batteries owe their stable electrochemical performance under stretching to the twisted structure of the fibre electrodes and the stretchability of the substrate and gel electrolyte, with the latter also acting as an anchor. When the batteries were stretched, the spring-like structure of the two electrodes was maintained.

The full article can be read at Chemistry World.

A link to the original article can be found below:

Super-stretchy lithium-ion battery based on carbon nanotube fiber
Ye Zhang, Wenyu Bai, Jing Ren, Wei Weng, Huijuan Lin, Zhitao Zhang and Huisheng Peng
J. Mater. Chem. A, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4TA01878H

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