Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Bright future for trace water analysis

MOF-based material has detection limit as low as traditional Karl Fischer titration

Researchers from Germany have devised a new way to detect trace water in solvents. Their technique combines luminescent metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) with a magnetic core to give a system that users can see change colour then fish out of the sample once the test is complete.

Source: Royal Society of Chemistry The microparticle core contributes superparamagnetic properties to the compound, while the shell exhibits a mixed yellow luminescence originating from Eu3+ and Tb3+

To read the full article please visit Chemistry World.

Composite materials combining multiple luminescent MOFs and superparamagnetic microparticles for ratiometric water detection
T. Wehner, M. T. Seuffert, J. R. Sorg, M. Schneider, K. Mandel, G. Sextl and K. Müller-Buschbaum
J. Mater. Chem. C, 2017, Advance Article

 

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New ingredients for edible electronics

Kitchen cupboard staples used in sensors for detecting digestive disorders

Love it or hate it, Marmite might have a place in medicine. Scientists in Australia have used this British favourite, along with Vegemite and jelly, in electrodes for hydrogel-based devices that assess digestive problems in patients.


Source: Shutterstock
Toxicity shouldn’t be an issue for medical devices made from Vegemite or Marmite

Stomach-related health problems are increasing: stomach cancer is the second deadliest cancer and 76.6% of people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are undiagnosed. Traditional methods of detecting these illnesses, such as endoscopy, colonoscopy and surgery, are often invasive and unpleasant. One alternative is to use small devices, known as electronic capsules, that pass easily through the digestive system. However, researchers must make them using materials that will not damage the human body.

To read the full article visit Chemistry World.

Conducting hydrogels for edible electrodes
Alex Keller, Jonathan Pham, Holly Warren and Marc in het Panhuis
J. Mater. Chem. B, 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7TB01247K, Paper

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Congratulations to the winners of the Journal of Materials Chemistry C poster prizes at the Joint EuroCVD 21 – Baltic ALD 15 Conference

 

The Journal of Materials Chemistry C sponsored three poster prizes at the Joint EuroCVD 21 – Baltic ALD 15 Conference, held from the 11th to 14th of June 2017 in Linköping, Sweden. The poster prize winners were Richard O’Donoghue from Ruhr University Bochum for the poster titled “Gallium amide: the Resurrection Towards New Functional Materials”, Véronique Cremers from Ghent University for the poster titled “ALD oxidation barrier for Cu and Fe powder”, and Fouzi Addou from Université de Toulouse for the poster titled “Compatibility of MOCVD Cu metallization with polymer pretreatments developed for other deposition processes”. Congratulations to these winners and to the organisers for a successful conference.

For more information about future events, follow @euroCVD on twitter.

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Glowing dyes move data storage beyond binary

A method to chemically save information in quaternary code using dyes could change how we approach data storage

Source: © Royal Society of Chemistry The researchers used their quaternary code to save and read different RNA nucleotide sequences (top) and could even create more intricate patterns like an owl

A flexible, transparent polymer film endowed with two small molecules can glow in three different colours, enabling data storage in a quaternary code. This chemical approach to data storage could allow more information to be stored in a smaller space than is possible with binary systems.

Modern storage devices need to be portable, robust and capable of carrying large amounts of data. One way to store information is through optical data storage. Data is recorded by making patterns that can be read back with the aid of light. Most techniques use binary code – systems that allow two different states, 1 and 0, for each data unit – to store information. Efforts have been made to increase the amount of information that these systems can store, mainly by physically reducing the size of each data unit. However, increasing the number of states each data unit could adopt, such as ternary (0, 1, 2) data storage, may lead to an exponential increase in information density.

To read the full article visit Chemistry World.

Beyond binary: optical data storage with 0, 1, 2, and 3 in polymer films
Peiran Wei, Bowen Li, Al de Leon and Emily Pentzer
J. Mater. Chem. C, 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7TC00929A, Paper

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2017 Journal of Materials Chemistry Lectureship – Nominations are now open!

The Journal of Materials Chemistry Executive Editorial Board is pleased to announce that the 2017 Journal of Materials Chemistry lectureship is now open for nominations.

This annual lectureship honours an early-career scientist who has made a significant contribution to the field of materials chemistry.

Professor Christopher Bettinger was awarded the 2016 Journal of Materials Chemistry Lectureship by the Journal of Materials Chemistry Executive Editorial Board, and presented his lecture at the 2017 Spring MRS in Arizona, USA on 19 April 2017.

Qualification

To be eligible for the Journal of Materials Chemistry Lectureship, the candidate should be in the early stage of their scientific career, typically within 10 years of attaining their doctorate or equivalent degree, and will have made a significant contribution to the field of materials chemistry.

Description

The recipient of the award will be asked to present a Journal of Materials Chemistry lecture at a conference decided upon by the recipient and the Editorial Office. The Journal of Materials Chemistry Editorial Office will provide £1,000 to the recipient for travel and accommodation costs, and will present the winner with the award at this lecture. The award recipient will also be asked to contribute an invited article to the journal and will have their work showcased on the back cover of the issue in which their article is published.

Selection

The recipient of the lectureship will be selected and endorsed by the Journal of Materials Chemistry’s prestigious Executive Editorial Board.

Nominations

Those wishing to make a nomination should send details of the nominee, including a brief curriculum vita (no longer than 2 pages) and a letter supporting the nomination (no longer than 2 pages), to the Journal of Materials Chemistry Editorial Office by 16th June 2017. Please note that self-nomination is permitted, and you may re-nominate previous candidates.

Send a nomination here today: materials-rsc@rsc.org

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Martyn McLachlan: JMC C’s newest Associate Editor

Journal of Materials Chemistry C would like to give a warm welcome to our newest Associate Editor, Dr Martyn McLachlan, who joined us at the start of April. Dr McLachlan is a Reader (Associate Professor) and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Materials, Imperial College London. Previously he held a Royal Academy of Engineering/EPRSC Research Fellowship (2007-2012) at the same institute. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Glasgow in the Department of Chemistry. 

His research interests focus on the development of solution processed interlayer and electrode materials for photovoltaic and light emitting devices. Of particular interest to him are the correlation of processing-structure-performance relationships of solution processed organic, inorganic and hybrid devices and the characterisation of their surfaces and buried interfaces. His research is aimed at the integration of the materials and techniques developed into large volume manufacturing of plastic electronics. He has published more than 63 peer-reviewed articles and has been invited to give numerous lectures at international conferences.

Further information about Martyn McLachlan can be found on his webpage.

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Carbon nanofibre offers new spin on catalysts

Electrospinning carbon nanofibre into an electrocatalyst paves the way to flexible energy storage devices

Scientists from China and Singapore have used electrospinning to make a free-standing catalyst for generating hydrogen and oxygen that could be made on an industrial scale.

Oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution are electrocatalysed in water splitting devices. The best catalysts are usually platinum-based, but they are costly and not very durable, which limits their use on a large scale.

To read the full article visit Chemistry World.

Design and synthesis of porous channel-rich carbon nanofibers for self-standing oxygen reduction reaction and hydrogen evolution reaction bifunctional catalysts in alkaline medium
Dongxiao Ji, Shengjie Peng, Jia Lu, Linlin Li, Shengyuan Yang, Guorui Yang, Xiaohong Qin, Madhavi Srinivasan and Seeram Ramakrishna
J. Mater. Chem. A, 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7TA00828G, Paper

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Who says wooden windows wouldn’t work?

Scientists in China have turned wood into a transparent material that could be used as a replacement for glass in energy efficient buildings.

Windows are a key factor in making buildings more energy efficient, by helping to control heat and light levels. For instance, windows that transmit visible light but block infra-red light could reduce the need for air conditioning in buildings. ‘Lighting and air conditioning account for 30-40% of the total energy used in buildings, most of which is exchanged via windows,’ says Yanfeng Gao, one of the authors of the research and a professor at Shanghai University.

Source: © Royal Society of Chemistry
A model house with transparent wood windows (left hand house) had a cooler interior than one with glass windows. The cooling effect is improved by adding caesium tungsten oxide nanoparticles (top row)

To read the fill article visit Chemistry World.

Transparent wood containing CsxWO3 nanoparticles for heat-shielding window applications
Ziya Yu, Yongji Yao, Jianing Yao, Liangmiao Zhang, Zhang Chen, Yanfeng Gao and Hongjie Luo
J. Mater. Chem. A, 2017,5, 6019-6024
DOI: 10.1039/C7TA00261K, Communication

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Photoinduced Processes in Nucleic Acids and Proteins: Faraday Discussion – call for abstracts

We are delighted to announce that Photoinduced Processes in Nucleic Acids and Proteins: Faraday Discussion will be held at Kerala, India on the 11 – 13 January 2018. Abstracts are now invited for this event so submit today and take advantage of this excellent opportunity to present your work alongside scientists from across the globe.

Paper submission deadline August 21st 2017

Oral abstract submission deadline April 24th 2017

Poster abstract submission 16th October 2017

Themes include: Light induced charge and energy transport in nucleic acids and proteins, Photocrosslinking between nucleic acids and proteins, Light induced damage and repair in nucleic acids and proteins, Bionanophotonics

For full details of speakers and conference themes, please visit the event web page below:

http://www.rsc.org/events/detail/24607/photoinduced-processes-in-nucleic-acids-and-proteins-faraday-discussion

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Stressed polymers give calf massages

Compression stockings could gain a massage function thanks to stress-memory polymers

Scientists in Hong Kong have unveiled the stress-memory behaviour of polyurethane fibres, and are using them to develop compression stockings that, for the first time, also massage the leg.

After deforming, triggers such as heat or light return shape memory polymers to their original shape. In a similar vein, stress memory polymers can store stress, which is retrieved by heating.

To read the full article visit Chemistry World.

Stress-memory polymeric filaments for advanced compression therapy
Harishkumar Narayana, Jinlian Hu, Bipin Kumar, Songmin Shang, Jianping Han, Pengqing Liu, Tan Lin, FengLong Ji and Yong Zhu
Journal Article J. Mater. Chem. B, 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6TB03354G, Paper

 

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