Archive for December, 2010

Merry Christmas from Journal of Materials Chemistry!

We would like to wish you all a merry Christmas and a happy New Year! The Editorial office will be closed from 24th December 2010 and will re-open on January 4th 2011.

We’re looking forward to 2011, which will see some great themed issues, the 2011 Journal of Materials Chemistry Lectureship and much more! Don’t miss out – sign up to our blog’s RSS feed!

from the Journal of Materials Chemistry Editorial team

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2011 Journal of Materials Chemistry Lectureship – Call for Nominations

Call for Nominations!

I am pleased to announce that the 2011 Journal of Materials Chemistry Lectureship is open for nominations. This annual lectureship honours a scientist who has made a significant contribution to the field of materials chemistry.

Qualification

To be eligible for the Journal of Materials Chemistry Lectureship, the candidate should be in the earlier stages of their scientific career, typically within 10 years of attaining their doctorate or equivalent degree, and will have made a significant contribution to the field.

Description

The recipient of the lectureship will be asked to present a lecture three times, one of which will be located in the home country of the recipient. The Journal of Materials Chemistry Editorial Office will provide the sum of £1000 to the recipient for travel and accommodation costs. The lectureship recipient will be presented with the lectureship certificate at one of the three lectures. They will also be asked to contribute a lead article to the journal and will have their work showcased on the back cover of the issue in which their article is published.

Selection

The recipient of the lectureship will be selected and endorsed by the Journal of Materials Chemistry Editorial Board.

The 2010 lectureship was won by Dan Luo, Cornell University, USA.

Nominations

Those wishing to make a nomination should send details of the nominee including a brief C.V. (no longer than 2 pages) together with a letter supporting the nomination (no longer than 2 pages), to the Journal of Materials Chemistry Editorial Office by 18th February 2011. Self nomination is not permitted.

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Hot Article: Triazole–pyridine ligands: a novel approach to chromophoric iridium arrays

This ‘Hot’ paper describes the development of a novel click chemistry approach for the modular construction of tuneable multichromophoric light emitters. To make these iridium complexes, one, two or three triazole–pyridine units were effectively built into the heteroaromatic macromolecule using versatile acetylene- and azide-functionalised precursors.

Triazole–pyridine ligands: a novel approach to chromophoric iridium arrays

The approach described by the team from the Netherlands is of interest for the design and construction of various light-emitting materials by covalent linking of different chromophores, including versatile tuning of the material properties, using ‘click’ chemistry. One example of such an application was demonstrated; two iridium centres showing ‘yellow’ emission and one fluorene unit showing ‘blue’ emission were combined via the covalent linkage to provide a white-light emitter.

Interested in knowing more?  Read for free until January 18th.

Triazole–pyridine ligands: a novel approach to chromophoric iridium arrays
Michal Juríček, Marco Felici, Pablo Contreras-Carballada, Ján Lauko, Sandra Rodríguez Bou, Paul H. J. Kouwer, Albert M. Brouwer and Alan E. Rowan
J. Mater. Chem., 2011, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C0JM03117H, Paper

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Hot Article: Enhancing the gas and energy storage properties of carbide-derived carbons

Activation of carbide-derived carbons: a route to materials with enhanced gas and energy storage properties  Thermal halogenation of a wide range of metal carbides provides a simple route to a class of so-called carbide-derived carbon (CDC) materials. The porosity of the CDCs, which is mainly in the microporous regime, may be modulated by the choice of metal carbide precursor and synthesis process, the maximum surface area achieved is only up to 2500 m2g−1, which limits their use in gas storage or in electrochemical capacitor applications that require larger surface areas.

This Highlight article is focused on what has and can be done to enhance the textural properties of CDCs via further post-synthesis treatments and the ramifications of such modifications on their gas/energy storage capacity. The main developments in physical and chemical activation of CDCs and consequences on gas and energy storage are summarised by the authors from the University of Nottingham, UK, and Instituto Nacional del Carbón, Spain.

Interested in knowing more?  Read for free until January 14th.

Activation of carbide-derived carbons: a route to materials with enhanced gas and energy storage properties
M. Sevilla and R. Mokaya
J. Mater. Chem., 2011, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C0JM03347B, Highlight

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Issue 2 now online with a flowery front cover

Novel flower-like CoS hierarchitectures: one-pot synthesis and electrochemical propertiesThe second issue of Journal of Materials Chemistry in 2011 is now online.  The front cover features a communication from Lifang Jiao and co-workers based at Nankai University in China.  The paper, entitled ‘Novel flower-like CoS hierarchitectures: one-pot synthesis and electrochemical properties’ describes the synthesis, by a facile solvothermal method, of novel 3D flower-like CoS hierarchitectures and CoS microspheres which display good electrochemical properties.

Thinking of submitting to Journal of Materials Chemistry in 2011?  Sumbit online here.

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Hot Article: Luminescent quantum-dot-sized semiconducting polymer nanspheres

In this ‘Hot’ paper, Mark Green and co-workers from Kings College, London report the synthesis of small luminescent conjugated polymer nanoparticles and the role of poly(ethylene glycol) in the nanoparticle structure.  This is the first time that semiconducting polymer nanospheres (SPNs) on the scale of quantum dots have been made using miniemulsion methods.

Luminescent quantum-dot-sized conjugated polymer nanoparticles—nanoparticle formation in a miniemulsion system

SPNs have been made using miniemulsion methods previously but the resulting materials have been significantly larger than quantum dots.  Quantum dots are desirable as these are the nanomaterial of choice for cell imaging.  The SPNs were characterized by TEM, absorption and emission spectroscopy, they were found to be stable in solution for months and bright and are expected to be effective in various fluorescence applications.

Interested in knowing more? Read for free until 13th January 2011.

Luminescent quantum-dot-sized conjugated polymer nanoparticles—nanoparticle formation in a miniemulsion system
Zeina Hashim, Philip Howes and Mark Green
J. Mater. Chem., 2011, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C0JM02935A, Paper

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Chemical Transformations of Nanoparticles Themed Issue: Submission Deadline, 25th January 2011

Don’t forget Journal of Materials Chemistry is publishing a themed issue on Chemical Transformations of Nanoparticles with Professor Dmitri Talapin (University of Chicago, USA) and Professor Yadong Yin (University of California, Riverside, USA) as the Guest Editors.

The deadline for the receipt of manuscripts for this themed issue is 25th January 2011.

Manuscripts can be submitted using our online submission service. Please indicate on you submission letter that your manuscript is submitted in response to the call for papers for the Chemical Transformations of Nanoparticles themed issue.

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Hot Article: Acid-directed synthesis of SERS-active hierarchical assemblies of silver nanostructures

Acid-directed synthesis of SERS-active hierarchical assemblies of silver nanostructuresSurface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active silver hierarchical assemblies are synthesized in solution by the assistance of small acid molecules without using any polymer surfactant or capping agent. In this ‘Hot’ paper a team from China and the USA demonstrate the acid-directed self-assembly of metal nanoparticles (MNPs) into large systems with complex structures. They verify that small acid molecules (citric acid, mandelic acid, etc.) incorporated into conventional solution chemistry can direct the assembly of MNPs into well-defined hierarchical structures. The constructed assembled structures with highly roughened surfaces can be highly sensitive SERS platforms, and the fabricated core–shell Ag wires show especially high SERS sensitivity toward the analyte melamine.

Interested in knowing more? Read for free until January 11th 2011.

Acid-directed synthesis of SERS-active hierarchical assemblies of silver nanostructures
Bin Zhang, Ping Xu, Xinmiao Xie, Hong Wei, Zhipeng Li, Nathan H. Mack, Xijiang Han, Hongxing Xu and Hsing-Lin Wang
J. Mater. Chem., 2011, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C0JM02837A, Paper

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Hot Highlight: Alloying and phase segregation of gold-platinum nanoparticles

Gold-platinum nanoparticles: alloying and phase segregation This report by Chuan-Jian Zhong and co-workers at the State University of New York at Binghamton highlights recent insights into the nanoscale phase properties of gold-platinum (AuPt) nanoparticles.  The alloying and phase-segregation of supported AuPt nanoparticles depend on a combination of size, composition, and preparation parameters.  This system serves as an example to shine a light on the importance of changes in physical and chemical properties in which nanoscale multimetallic materials may differ from their bulk counterparts.

Interested in knowing more? Read for free until 7th January 2011.

Gold-platinum nanoparticles: alloying and phase segregation
Bridgid Nekesa Wanjala, Jin Luo, Bin Fang, Derrick Mott and Chuan-Jian Zhong
J. Mater. Chem., 2011, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C0JM02682D, Highlight

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Hot Feature Article: The many nanoscale structures of polyaniline produced from aniline oxidation

The oxidation of aniline to produce “polyaniline”: a process yielding many different nanoscale structuresThe number of different nano- and micro-scale structures produced from the chemical oxidation of aniline into “polyaniline” is rivalled by few other organic materials.  Small and subtle changes in reaction parameters during aniline oxidation result in nanoscale structures such as tubes, flowers and even those resembling anatomical organs and sea animals!  A nanomaterial’s properties are highly dependent on its morphology so understanding polyaniline’s propensity for forming these structures is crucial towards tailoring the material for different applications as well as improving its synthetic reproducibility.

This ‘Hot’ Feature Article by Henry D. Tran from Fibron Technologies Inc. and Richard B. Kaner and co-workers from the University of California Los Angeles examines these different structures and the small and subtle changes in reaction parameters that result in their formation.  They discuss some of the highly debated aspects of these processes and give their perspective on where things are headed in the years to come.

Interested in knowing more?  Read for free until 6th January 2011.

The oxidation of aniline to produce “polyaniline”: a process yielding many different nanoscale structures
Henry D. Tran, Julio M. D’Arcy, Yue Wang, Peter J. Beltramo, Veronica A. Strong and Richard B. Kaner
J. Mater. Chem., 2011, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C0JM02699A, Feature Article

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