JAAS 30 Weeks to 30 – Week 25!

Single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: evaluation of three different pneumatic and piezo-based sample introduction systems for the characterization of silver nanoparticles

B. Franze et al

Week 25 is silver! This week’s paper is from our Nanoanalysis themed issue.

A worldwide concern over the toxicity risk of nanoparticles means that it is important to provide analytical tools that can characterize various types of nanomaterials in a sensitive and fast way. In this paper a team from Germany compared three techniques for the characterization of silver nanoparticles.

This paper will be free to read until Dec 5th .

Single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: evaluation of three different pneumatic and piezo-based sample introduction systems for the characterization of silver nanoparticles
Bastian Franze, Ingo Strenge and Carsten Engelhard
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2012, 27, 1074-1083
DOI: 10.1039/C2JA00003B

Week 30 will be…pearl

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HOT articles in JAAS

Take a look at our recent HOT JAAS articles, these are now free to access for the next few weeks!

Speciation Analysis of Antimony in Water Samples via Combined Nano-Sized TiO2 Colloid Preconcentration and AFS Analysis
Xingwen Wang,   Xuankun Li,   Xu Zhanga and   Shahua Qian
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, 29, 1944-1948
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00147H
Graphical Abstract

Laser ablation of an indium target: time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared spectra of In I in the 700–7700 cm−1 range
S. Civiš, P. Kubelík, M. Ferus, V. E. Chernov, E. M. Zanozina and L. Juha
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00123K

Laser-Ablation Sampling for Inductively Coupled Plasma Distance-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry
Alexander Gundlach-Graham, Elise A. Dennis, Steven J. Ray, Christie G. Enke, Charles J. Barinaga, David W. Koppenaal and Gary M. Hieftje
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00231H

Characterization of laser ablation sample introduction plasma plumes in fs-LA-ICP-MS
N. L. LaHaye, S. S. Harilal, P. K. Diwakar and A. Hassanein
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00200H

Determination of Total Uranium and Uranium Isotope Ratios in Human Urine by ICP-MS: Results of an Interlaboratory Study
John G. Arnason, Christine N. Pellegri and Patrick J. Parsons
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00235K
Graphical Abstract
Traceable Assigned Values in External Quality Assessment Schemes Compared to Those Obtained by Alternative Procedure: A Case Study for Cu, Se and Zn in Serum
Marina Patriarca, Cas Weykamp, Josiane Arnaud, Robert L. Jones, Patrick J. Parsons and Andrew Taylor
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00260A

Oxygen-18 stable isotope of exhaled breath CO2 as a non-invasive marker of Helicobacter pylori infection
Abhijit Maity, Suman Som, Chiranjit Ghosh, Gourab Dutta Banik, Sunil B. Daschakraborty, Shibendu Ghosh, Sujit Chaudhuri and Manik Pradhan
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00280F

Development of a fast laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry cell for sub-µm scanning of layered materials
Stijn J. M. Van Malderen, Johannes T. van Elteren and Frank Vanhaecke
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00137K

High-precision measurements of tungsten stable isotopes and application to Earth Sciences
Thomas Breton and Ghylaine Quitté
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00184B
Graphical Abstract

Elemental recoveries for metal oxide nanoparticles analysed by direct injection ICP-MS: influence of particle size, agglomeration state and sample matrix
Sylvie Motellier, Arnaud Guiot, Samuel Legros and Brice Fiorentino
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00213J

Exploration of a 3D Nano-channel Porous Membrane Material Combined with Laser-induced Breakdown Spectrometry for Fast and Sensitive Heavy Metal Detection of Solution Samples
Qi Shi, Guanghui Niu, Qingyu Lin, Xu Wang, Jie Wang, Fang Bian and Yixiang Duan
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00220B

Direct element analysis of honeys by atmospheric pressure glow discharge generated in contact with flowing liquid cathode
Krzysztof Greda, Piotr Jamroz, Anna Dzimitrowicz and Pawel Pohl
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00261J

Excitation of higher levels of singly charged copper ions in argon and neon glow discharges
Zdeněk Weiss, Edward B. M. Steers, Juliet C. Pickering, Volker Hoffmann and Sohail Mushtaq
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00309H

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EWCPS 2015 – European Winter Conference – Upcoming dates!

European Winter Conference logo

Important dates to remember:

Nomination of candidates for the European Plasma Award         October 31, 2014
Submission of abstracts for posters and oral presentations          October 31, 2014
Notification of acceptance for regular presentations                      November 17, 2014
Early-bird registration at reduced fee                                                November 30, 2014
Submission of abstracts for late poster presentations                    December 12, 2014
Notification of acceptance for poster presentations                        December 31, 2014

For more information about the conference, please follow the link EWCPS2015.

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JAAS 30 Weeks to 30 – Week 20!

Speciation of selenium in cells by HPLC-ICP-MS after (on-chip) magnetic solid phase extraction

Beibei Chen et. al.

Week 20 is china! This week’s paper is from 2013’s Top 25 most read JAAS articles collection.

A team from China has proposed an integrated microfluidic chip consisting of reaction, mixing, and extraction units, designed and fabricated for on-chip magnetic solid phase extraction. Combined with HPLC-ICP-MS it was used for selenium speciation in selenium-enriched yeast cells.

This paper will be free to read until Nov 15th.

Speciation of selenium in cells by HPLC-ICP-MS after (on-chip) magnetic solid phase extraction
Beibei Chen, Bin Hu, Man He, Qian Huang, Yuan Zhang and Xing Zhang
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2013, 28, 334-343
DOI: 10.1039/C2JA30280B

Week 25 will be…silver

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2015 Bunsen-Kirchoff Award for Analytical Spectroscopy

2015 Bunsen-Kirchoff Award for Analytical Spectroscopy


The DAAS – German Working group for Analytical Spectroscopy – regularly awards the “Bunsen-Kirchhoff-Preis für analytische Spektroskopie” to honour preferably the work of young scientists from universities, research institutes or industry who made excellent contributions to analytical spectroscopy. Especially preferred is an oeuvre in new areas like spectroscopy in nano compartments, spectroscopy of biomolecules a.s.o. The Award consists of an award-document and an amount of € 2.500,00 sponsored by Perkin Elmer and the DAAS seeks nominations for the 2015 Bunsen-Kirchhoff Award for Analytical Spectroscopy. The Award will be presented at the ANAKON in March 2015 in Graz (Austria).

A nomination (in electronic form) should include:
1. letter with the candidate´s accomplishments
2. list of publications or recent work,
3. scientific curriculum vitae stating the age of the candidate; the candidate´s
address, phone fax and e-mail.

Nominations can be made by members of DAAS but eligibility is open for any scientist meeting the requirements. Self-nomination is excluded. The decision as to whom the prize is to be awarded shall be made by a jury consisting of the current members of the board of DAAS.
Further information is available at:
https://www.gdch.de/netzwerk-strukturen/fachstrukturen/analytische-chemie/arbeitskreise/ak-dasp.html

All documents should be sent not later than 20 December 2014 to: Prof. Dr. Detlef Günther, President of the Jury for the Bunsen-Kirchhoff Award 2015, ETH Zürich, Laboratorium für Anorganische Chemie, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 1, HCI G113, CH-8093 Zürich (Schweiz)
E-Mail: Secretary, Ms Nicole Bachmann (nbachmann@inorg.chem.ethz.ch)

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JAAS 30 weeks to 30 – Week 15!

S.E. Gilbert et al

Week 15 is crystal! This week’s paper is from the Geological applications of laser ablation themed collection.

In this research pyrite crystals were examined, and the effect of laser type and their analytical paramenters on S isotope fractionation was investigated by a group from Australia and France.

This paper will be free to read until Sept 28th.

Optimisation of laser parameters for the analysis of sulphur isotopes in sulphide minerals by laser ablation ICP-MS
S. E. Gilbert, L. V. Danyushevsky, T. Rodemann, N. Shimizu, A. Gurenko, S. Meffre, H. Thomas, R. R. Large and D. Death
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, 29, 1042-1051
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00011K

Week 20 will be…china

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Top ten most accessed JAAS articles from April to June 2014

During the months April – June 2014, the most downloaded JAAS articles were:

Atomic spectrometry updates: Review of advances in atomic spectrometry and related techniques
E. Hywel Evans, Jorge Pisonero, Clare M. M. Smith and Rex N. Taylor
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, 29, 773-794
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA90019G

2013 Atomic spectrometry update—A review of advances in environmental analysis
Owen T. Butler, Warren R. L. Cairns, Jennifer M. Cook and Christine M. Davidson
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, 29, 17-50
DOI: 10.1039/C3JA90068A

Atomic spectrometry update. Review of advances in the analysis of metals, chemicals and materials
Simon Carter, Andy S. Fisher, Michael W. Hinds, Steve Lancaster and John Marshall
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2013, 28, 1814-1869
DOI: 10.1039/C3JA90051G

Atomic spectrometry update: Review of advances in the analysis of clinical and biological materials, foods and beverages
Andrew Taylor, Martin P. Day, Sarah Hill, John Marshall, Marina Patriarca and Mark White
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, 29, 386-426
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA90001D

Synchrotron-based chemical imaging reveals plumage patterns in a 150 million year old early bird
Phillip. L. Manning, Nicholas P. Edwards, Roy A. Wogelius, Uwe Bergmann, Holly E. Barden, Peter L. Larson, Daniela Schwarz-Wings, Victoria M. Egerton, Dimosthenis Sokaras, Roberto A. Mori and William I. Sellers
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2013, 28, 1024-1030
DOI: 10.1039/C3JA50077B

Effect of dwell time on single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry data acquisition quality
Aaron Hineman and Chady Stephan
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, 29, 1252-1257
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00097H

Atomic spectrometry updates. Review of advances in elemental speciation
Robert Clough, Chris F. Harrington, Steve J. Hill, Yolanda Madrid and Julian F. Tyson
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, 29, 1158-1196
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA90029D

2013 Atomic spectrometry update—A review of advances in X-ray fluorescence spectrometry
Margaret West, Andrew T. Ellis, Philip J. Potts, Christina Streli, Christine Vanhoof, Dariusz Wegrzynek and Peter Wobrauschek
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2013, 28, 1544-1590
DOI: 10.1039/C3JA90046K

Silver nanoparticle characterization using single particle ICP-MS (SP-ICP-MS) and asymmetrical flow field flow fractionation ICP-MS (AF4-ICP-MS)
Denise M. Mitrano, Angela Barber, Anthony Bednar, Paul Westerhoff, Christopher P. Higgins and James F. Ranville
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2012, 27, 1131-1142
DOI: 10.1039/C2JA30021D

What happens when n = 1000? Creating large- n geochronological datasets with LA-ICP-MS for geologic investigations
Alex Pullen, Mauricio Ibáñez-Mejía, George E. Gehrels, Juan C. Ibáñez-Mejía and Mark Pecha
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, 29, 971-980
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00024B

Interesting read? Please share your thoughts below!

And remember, you can submit direct to JAAS here 

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Recent HOT articles in JAAS

Take a look at these new HOT articles just published in JAAS. These papers will be free to read for the next 4 weeks. Enjoy!

A centrifugal microfluidic platform integrating monolithic capillary columns for high-throughput speciation of chromium
Peng Li, Yi-jun Chen, Hong-zhen Lian and Xin Hu
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00149D, Paper

The non-destructive determination of Pt in ancient Roman gold coins by XRF spectrometry
Michael W. Hinds, George Bevan and R. W. Burgess
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00170B, Paper

Grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence of periodic structures – a comparison between X-ray standing waves and geometrical optics calculations
Falk Reinhardt, Stanisław H. Nowak, Burkhard Beckhoff, Jean-Claude Dousse and Max Schoengen
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00164H, Paper

Enhancement of analyte atomic lines with excitation energies of about 5 eV in the presence of molecular gases in analytical glow discharges
Sohail Mushtaq, Edward B. M. Steers, Juliet C. Pickering and Petr Šmid
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00193A, Communication

Spectroscopic characterization and comparison between biologics, organics and mineral compounds using pulsed micro-hollow glow discharge
Randy L. Vander Wal, Chethan K. Gaddam and Michael J. Kulis
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00187G, Paper

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The Next Generation – An Interview with Bastian Franze

Today, we interview Bastian Franze, who is currently finishing his PhD in the University of Münster, under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Carsten Engelhard.

Bastian in his lab in Münster

Who or what inspired you to become a scientist?

Already as a child it became clear that science will be my passion. I was interested in many things that had to do with life science, environment, and technology. Later in school, more in-depth questions began to arise regarding the principles of nature and the theories and rules that apply. Especially the question about the composition of matter bothered me intensively, which led me to the decision to choose chemistry as a major in school and also as my major at university. Later on, my interest and curiosity in the analytical science was renewed due to an Analytical Chemistry course, offered by Prof. Uwe Karst. Just before the end of my studies I had the opportunity to do a research internship at the University of California in Davis in Prof. Hammock’s lab. I immediately liked the independent work on a specific research topic and enjoyed implementing own ideas.

Why did you choose your research group/University and what factors influenced your choice?

I chose the University of Münster mainly for two reasons. First, being able to study at one of the biggest universities in the country which is especially known for its scientific departments makes me proud and additionally boosted my motivation. Second, Münster as a city and the surroundings are very attractive for students as well as employees. The city is rich of history, culture, nightlife, and entertainment events. On the other hand the various recreation and sporting areas provide opportunities to keep your energy up.

With the renowned chemistry background, Münster has many research groups working on interesting topics. Carsten Engelhard as an up-and-coming scientist kindly offered me a position in his group where I could pursue my research in elemental analysis.

Can you explain a bit the purpose of your current research activities?

My research focuses on nanoparticle characterization with ICP-MS. As nanoparticles are nowadays applied more and more frequently, the analytical community has an obligation to develop methods capable of detecting small amounts of those particles in a variety of matrices in order to have tools available for risk assessment. During my studies, I dealt with the further development of the so called single particle detection methodology, where the detection of single nanoparticles reveals information about critical properties like size distribution and composition. As an application, I studied the dissolution behavior of silver nanoparticles in cell culture media. Moreover I developed a method for speciation of nanoparticle suspensions using capillary electrophoresis coupled to ICP-MS. For example, it is possible to detect and size nanoparticles in the presence of ionic species in the same sample.

As a side project in collaboration with Dr. Wolfgang Buscher, a low-argon-flow torch for an ICP-MS system was coupled to a gas chromatograph. Sensitive mercury speciation with drastically reduced argon consumption of around 1 L/min was feasible.

How is a typical day in your lab?

I normally start with setting up the parts needed and getting everything running. As some of the instruments are frequently used and run almost 24/7, one really needs to structure analysis time and plan experiments. After experiments are performed successfully, I evaluate the raw data in the office or use the off-lab time for writing or preparing texts and presentations. During the semester there is a group meeting once a week in which all group members frequently present their research activities, report on the participation of a recent conference or practice the presentation of poster or talks at a conference. Around 4 pm the group meets for coffee break to discuss or just chat.

What common activities are organized in your research group?

Apart from the weekly seminars in which we can present our recent results and discuss problems or ideas we organize some social events every now and then. This includes football training, breakfast, and barbecue. Additionally, if group members arrive or leave or guests come over for research activities or visits we arrange group dinners and celebrate the achievement of a degree or publication of a scientific paper.

What app/programs do you typically use?

For writing and presentation of results I commonly use the usual suspects Word and Powerpoint. For data evaluation and treatment I really prefer Origin as it exhibits almost all functions needed for the kind of data treatment I perform. Data evaluation of microscopic pictures is performed with ImageJ. I also use CorelDRAW and Photoshop for editing graphics and figures.

How do you search for scientific information? How do you manage your bibliography?

Generally, I look for specific publications via Web of Science, Google Scholar or SciFinder. To keep myself up to date I also have subscribed to RSS feeds of various journals. If I am interested in papers and if they are relevant for my own research, I normally categorize them in my EndNote library to have them readily available.

What are your views on JAAS? Which type of articles do you prefer? Do you miss some content?

The JAAS is one of the journals I visit the most. I really like the mix of papers dealing with fundamental research, studies about applications of various techniques for a variety of samples, as well as themed issues. In addition, I frequently take a look at the JAAS News blog to read about conference announcements or summaries, and highlighted papers.

What do you like and dislike the most about your work?

I like my colleagues, ICP-MS, and coffee breaks. I dislike the canteen. I also like having an idea and getting it to work. I like the working atmosphere and am happy and can call myself lucky to have almost every analytical tool available here to face many analytical problems. I am very thankful to Prof. Uwe Karst, Prof. Carsten Engelhard, and the scholarship programs to carry out research and for being able to attend many important conferences and exchange ideas with or present research results to a broad audience.

I do not like the frustrating part of research in Analytical Chemistry: not working instruments.

What do you expect to be doing in 5 years time?

As I do not have the specific plan for the perfect employment to be in, there may be two or three possibilities. Especially for an analytical chemist, there are many options. First of all, the industrial sector offers great opportunities for graduates especially if one wants to move up the corporate ladder. Besides, the public sector does also offer positions, some of which sound really attractive. I could also see myself in a research institute apart from the academic sector where I can still develop ideas and put them into practice. Anyway, the decision where to go is important and I will definitely reflect the possibilities properly. One important prerequisite for me is to work in a friendly atmosphere and where I really can enjoy my work.

What do you enjoy doing when you are not in the lab?

Definitely football. I play, watch, and travel for football. I would say that this is the most time-consuming hobby I have. Besides and especially in football summer and winter break, I love to go snowboarding and travelling or spend time with my girlfriend and my friends. On vacation, I often go hiking, diving or just explore the countryside. I also like to read books, especially crime thrillers, or watch a good movie or TV show.

Thanks a lot Bastian! And congratulations for the World Cup!

Have a look as Bastian’s most recent publication in JAAS:

J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2012,27, 1074-1083 DOI: 10.1039/C2JA00003B
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JAAS 30 weeks to 30 – Week 10!

 Cassiterite fingerprinting by LA-ICP-MS

Hans-Eike Gabler et al.

This week is tin! This week’s paper is from a themed collection from the 2013 European Winter Conference on Plasma Spectrochemistry, Krakow, Poland.

The US Government has classiifed cassiterite (SnO2) as a ‘conflict mineral’. This means that all companies that use tin in their products must verify that their tin does not originate from conflict regions such as the Democratic Republic of the Congo where there is an ongoing violent conflict. In this paper, Gabler et al. look at a geochemical fingerprinting method for cassiterite based on LA-ICP-MS.

Cassiterite fingerprinting by LA-ICP-MS
Hans-Eike Gäbler, Sönke Rehder, Andreas Bahr, Frank Melcher and Simon Goldmann
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2013, 28, 1247-1255
DOI: 10.1039/C3JA50106J

Week 15 will be…crystal

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