Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Getting closer to secrets on the seabed

Graphical Abstract

Researchers from Spain have engineered a laser spectrometer to analyse solids underwater that they hope to eventually develop for deep sea research.1

Stand-off laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (ST-LIBS) is a technique to identify the elemental composition of solids at a distance, enabling safe analysis of explosive, radioactive or toxic compounds.2 While this technique is well-developed and widely used in air – Javier Laserna and coworkers at the University of Malaga built a ST-LIBS system able to differentiate between common explosives and contaminants such as hand cream or motor oil3 – there is no current technology to apply it underwater.

Read the full article over at Chemistry World >>


A study of underwater stand-off laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for chemical analysis of objects in the deep ocean
F. J. Fortes, S. Guirado, A. Metzinger and J. J. Laserna
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2015, 30, 1050-1056
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00489B, Paper

Do you fancy submitting an article to JAAS? Why not submit to us here today or alternatively email us with your suggestions!

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JAAS Emerging Investigator Lectureship awardees

We are delighted to announce the winners of the inaugural JAAS Emerging Investigator Lectureship. Launched to coincide with the 30th anniversary of the journal, the lectureship will be awarded annually from 2015 to recognise and support an emerging scientist working in the area of atomic spectrometry in the early stages of their independent career.

With so many exceptional and highly deserving nominations, it was decided to award the JAAS Emerging Investigator Lectureship to two winners this year.

Congralutaions to Gerardo Gamez (Texas Tech University) and Lara Lobo Revilla (University of Oviedo)!

Introducing Lara Lobo Revilla:

Lara Lobo Revilla

Lara Lobo Revilla

Lara Lobo Revilla is a “Marie Curie Clarin-Cofund” postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oviedo since October 2014. She studied Chemistry at the University of Oviedo, where she also started her PhD in 2006 working on a European project aimed at the instrumental development and analytical applications of a prototype based on Glow Discharge-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry. Under the supervision of Prof. Rosario Pereiro and Dr. Nerea Bordel, she obtained her PhD degree in 2011 and was given the Extraordinary Doctorate Award (Physical and Analytical Chemistry). After she finished her PhD she got an IEF Marie-Curie Fellowship and joined the A&MS group of Prof. Frank Vanhaecke in the Analytical Chemistry Department at Ghent University (Belgium). Her research for about 3 years at UGent has mainly dealt with isotopic analysis for provenancing ancient glass. Currently, she is involved in the development of analytical methods to obtain elemental, molecular and isotopic information based on the use of different analytical mass spectrometry techniques.

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Introducing Gerardo Gamez:

Gerardo Gamez

Gerardo Gamez obtained his B.Sc., summa cum laude, and M.S. in Chemistry at the University of Texas at El Paso where he performed research with Prof. Gardea-Torresdey in environmental chemistry. He obtained his PhD in Analytical Chemistry at Indiana University-Bloomington with Prof. Hieftje where he performed research in plasma-based analytical spectrochemistry. During this time he obtained fellowships from the ACS-DAC and MERC, as well as the first Richard Payling Award. His postdoctoral work at ETH Zurich with Prof. Zenobi was in the area of ambient molecular MS. He then worked as a Scientist at EMPA Thun in the field of materials characterization by atomic spectroscopy. In the fall of 2013 he joined the faculty of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Texas Tech University. His research group focuses on instrumentation and method development of high-throughput chemical imaging techniques via GDOES elemental mapping, ambient desorption/ionization MS sources, as well as performing fundamental studies to better understand laboratory plasmas. He has more than 50 peer-reviewed publications (h-index 24), and given more than 30 oral presentations (including 15 invited lectures). He has also served as president of the Indiana Section of the Society for Applied Spectroscopy, coordinator of an EC Marie Curie Research Training Network (GLADNET, 16 partners, 11 countries), co-organizer of the 1st International Symposium on Glow Discharge Spectroscopy, and chair of the Atomic Spectroscopy section of the SCIX conference.

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The Next Generation- An Interview with Flávio V. Nakadi

Today we interview a truly exceptional young PhD student, a true expert in various ancient arts (e.g., origami and brewing beer), Flávio Venâncio Nakadi, a PhD student at the Universidade de São Paulo, working under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Márcia A.M.S. da Veiga.


Flávio in his lab in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

Q: Who or what inspired you to become a scientist?

A: I believe the first time I said “I want to be a scientist” I was 7 years old. I was always curious about how everything works: from nature to technology. I used to watch a TV show called “Beakman’s World”, which showed many chemical and physical phenomena and explained them in an easy way that a child could “comprehend”. It fascinated me! Later, my mother gave me a chemistry kit when I was 10 years old, which was the first step into my career.

During Analytical Chemistry classes, after my first contact with equipment, in particular spectrometers, I knew that I would study in this area. I had the opportunity to begin my master’s degree with my supervisor, Prof. Dr. da Veiga with atomic absorption spectrometry and, since 2009, I am working in AAS.

Q: Why did you choose your research group/University and what factors influenced your choice?

A: The University of São Paulo is one of the best Universities in Latin America; therefore, the choice was natural. However, I chose it because it is located in the city where I live. When I started my studies in Chemistry, I knew I made the right choice. Before working with atomic spectrometry, I tried electrochemistry and inorganic chemistry. Both areas were great, but they were not exactly what I was looking for. I realized what I wanted to do during analytical chemistry classes: to work with analytical instruments. Prof. Dr. da Veiga was new in our department and the only researcher who worked with elemental analysis (AAS). I could work with her and see her laboratory and research group grow, and I am very grateful that I could share this experience with all of them.

Q: Can you explain a bit the purpose of your current research activities?

A: High-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry (HR CS MAS) is a technique that still shows new possibilities for elemental analysis. The determination of non-metals by monitoring the absorbance of diatomic molecules with an AAS instrument has brought new possibilities to the field. I have studied mainly the determination of sulfur via CS molecule in coal and diesel samples, the latter as direct analysis with Pd nanoparticles as chemical modifier.

Furrthermore, a new methodology that I have developed in the lab of Prof. Dr. Resano has enabled isotopic analysis with HR CS MAS. There is always a wavelength shift between the atomic lines of different isotopes, but it is generally too small for detection (less than 1 pm). However, diatomic molecules show larger isotopic shifts due to vibrational transitions, enough to be detected by a high-resolution spectrometer. In this way, it was possible to evaluate the chlorine isotopes as Al35Cl and Al37Cl with HR CS MAS.

Q: How is a typical day in your lab?

A: The first “experiment” of the day is coffee brewing. I usually organize everything that I need one day after, because we have two spectrometers for 10 people. When I use the instrument, I begin at 8 a.m. and there is no limit to end: sometimes at 5 p.m., sometimes at 10 p.m. I collect my data and process it the next day. We generally have lunch around 12 p.m. and use our free time to talk about everything, mostly nonsense subjects. Occasionally, I am responsible to do the maintenance of the spectrometers. Once in a month, we discuss our results with our supervisor.

Q: What common activities are organized in your research group?

A: We organize birthday parties in our laboratory, with junk food, soda, beer, and a cake. There are two barbecues each year: at the end of the year and at our supervisor birthday. We go out when someone publishes a paper, and the first author decide where the celebration is going to take place. In my case, always a bar.

Q: What app/programs do you typically use?

A: I usually write with Microsoft Word, although I also use LaTeX for some academic purposes. I like Microsoft Excel for data evaluation and/or processing, but Origin is my main choice for plotting graphs and spectra. Finally, but no less important, I use Microsoft PowerPoint for presentations.

Q: How do you search for scientific information? How do you manage your bibliography?

A: I search in Web of Science, Scopus, Science Direct, and Google Scholar. Sometimes I look directly in the journal sites, such as JAAS. I prefer to organize my bibliography in my computer folders, although I am beginning to use Mendeley to help me.

Q: What are your views on JAAS? Which type of articles do you prefer? Do you miss some content?

A: I have learned with Dr. da Veiga that JAAS is our first option for publication in atomic spectrometry. I always find interesting papers about this field, where my preferred ones are AAS and ICP techniques. I really like JAAS reviews, which are complete and straightforward to the subject.

Q: What do you like and dislike the most about your work?

A: I love working with analytical equipment and understanding their components. I want to know what they really can do and explore all the possibilities. It is funny because we usually do not have all the tools required; therefore, this topic is barely an option! I like my research group, in which I can talk about academic issues as well as tell jokes. I believe good relations are key to move the research forward. Finally, I enjoy when there are problems to be fixed, because I always learn something new while I try to fix them. However, I do not like them when they appear at 7 p.m. I feel disappointed when I work with people that does not want to learn.

Q: What do you expect to be doing in 5 years time?

A: That is a difficult question! I do not usually think too much in the future, because it is unpredictable. Generally, I prefer to stay focused on the present time and then I see which doors will be open. Although there are possibilities in large companies, I prefer academic research. Therefore, I would like to be a university researcher.

Q: What do you enjoy doing when you are not in the lab?

A: Everything related to beer, from brewing to drinking it. I have to learn much more about this beautiful and elegant beverage, therefore I am always trying to read about it or talk with people who knows this art. Origami (paper folding) has a special place in my hobbies, although I would like to practice it more than I usually do. I also like videogames and TV shows.

Surely, Breaking Bad. Thanks a lot, Flávio!

Have a look at Flávio recent articles in JAAS:

Chlorine isotope determination via the monitoring of the AlCl molecule by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry–a case study

FV Nakadi, M da Veiga, M Aramendía, E García-Ruiz, M Resano

Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry, 2015, Advance article

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JAAS Emerging Investigator Lectureship winners announced

JAAS, 2014, Issue 1We are delighted to announce the winners of the inaugural JAAS Emerging Investigator Lectureship. Launched to coincide with the 30th anniversary of the journal, the lectureship will be awarded annually from 2015 to recognise and support an emerging scientist working in the area of atomic spectrometry in the early stages of their independent career.

With so many exceptional and highly deserving nominations, it was decided to award the JAAS Emerging Investigator Lectureship to two winners this year.

Congralutaions to Gerardo Gamez (Texas Tech University) and Lara Lobo Revilla (University of Oviedo)!

Lectureship award details

As a winner of the lectureship, both Gerardo and Lara will be able to present their research at a relevant high-profile international meeting and receive a contribution of up to £1000 each to cover associated travel and accommodation costs. They will be awarded a certificate and invited to contribute a paper to JAAS.

You can read more about eligibility and the selection process in the call for nominations post.

We will be posting more information about our winners soon!

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The 6th Asia-Pacific Winter Conference on Plasma Spectrochemistry

Graphical abstract

“to bring together spectroscopists on a worldwide scale to stimulate contacts and exchange of experiences.”

Dates for your diary

Abstract Submission deadline: September 1st 2015

Early-Bird Registration Deadline: March 15th 2015

Conference Registration Date: May 19th 2015

Conference Dates: May 20th-22nd 2015

For more information please visit the conference website

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European Workshop on Laser Ablation 2016

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European Workshop on Laser Ablation 2016
12 – 15 July 2016
Ljubljana, Slovenia


Registration will open in early 2016!
Early registration deadline (discounted rate) – 20th May 2016

The Registration Fee for participants and students includes:

Entrance to the scientific session
Certificate of attendance
Congress folders, badge, Final Programme and Book of Abstracts
Coffee breaks
Lunches on Wednesday, July 13, Thursday, July 14 and Friday, July 15
Icebreaker Reception on Tuesday, July 12
Afternoon Social Programme on Wednesday, July 13
Gala Dinner on Thursday, July 14

For more information about the conference, please see the webiste

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2015 European Winter Conference on Plasma Spectrochemistry – Poster Prize Winners

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Poster Prize Winners

1. Monika Winkler, TU Graz, Münzgrabenstraße, Graz, 8010, Austria
“Listen to your RF generator – On the seeming carbon-induced enhancement of elements like arsenic and selenium in inductively coupled plasmas”


2. Andreas Zitek,
University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, BOKU Vienna, Department of Chemistry, Division of Analytical Chemistry, VIRIS Lab, Konrad-Lorenz-Straße 24, Vienna, 3430, Austria
“Improving the spatial analysis and interpretation of LA-ICP-MS data by the application of GIS methods – considerations on achievable spatial resolution, uncertainties and multilayer interpretation”


3. Karen Murphy,
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Chemical Sciences Division, Material Measurement Laboratory, 100 Bureau Drive Stop 8391, Gaithersburg, 20899, United States
“Validation of Single Particle (sp)ICP-MS for Measurements of Nanoparticle Size and Evaluation of its Potential to Assess the Influence of the Coating on the Stability of Gold Nanoparticles in Suspension”


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The Next Generation- An Interview with David Douglas

Today we interview, Dr. David Douglas, a post-doc at LGC Limited, currently working in the group of Dr. Heidi Goenaga-Infante.


David in his lab

Who or what inspired you to become a scientist?

From an early age I was fascinated by how the world around me worked and would often take things apart to understand the processes that culminated in an output or action. I received a microscope one Christmas from my parents, which populated more questions than it answered and fueled my need to improve my understanding. Two inspirational Chemistry teachers, Mr Gordon Waston-Broughton and Mr Tim Rutherford, kept this need burning and encouraged me to study Chemistry at Plymouth University. That is where my first research project began under the keen eyes of Dr Michael Foulkes and Dr Andrew Fisher. I enjoyed research so much I decided I had to attempt a PhD. I was lucky enough that such a position had become available in Prof. Barry Sharp and Dr Helen Reid’s group at Loughborough University, where I once again began to deconstruct things to understand how they worked. By sharing in the passion these people have for science, I have been inspired to follow it as a career and a hobby.

Why did you choose your research group/University and what factors influenced your choice?

I currently work within the Inorganic Research Team of the Science and Innovation section at LGC Ltd, under the watchful eyes of Heidi Goenaga-Infante. My first experience of the group was through a joint Knowledge Transfer Project (KTP) with Loughborough University focusing on improving metrological bio-imaging by LA-ICP-MS.

LGC is a commercial entity that is home to the UK’s designated National Measurement Institute (NMI) for Chemical and Biological Measurement. As such employees are exposed to a large range of research topics; ranging from large European funded measurement projects (EMPIR) and international comparison studies (CCQM), to the smaller commercial external and internal projects. During my KTP I was exposed to the plethora of instrumentation and collaboration at LGC and the potential for metrological research in solid sample analysis. This combined with the range of applications drew me to my current position.

Another big part of why I chose LGC was down to the group of people I work with. They come from a range of cultural backgrounds and scientific experiences; in an environment where scientific discussion is encouraged, this makes for some motivating and inspiring ideas. Without their support my job would be impossible.

Can you explain a bit the purpose of your current research activities?

My current research activities focus on improving metrology of LA-ICP-MS analysis and the traceability of these measurements.

I am currently working with my colleagues on the development of new calibration strategies to determine localised metal concentrations in tissues; a topic that has received a lot of interest in the research community and something of a personal interest. We are focusing on improving the uncertainty associated with these measurements and thus enhance spatial discrimination of analyte concentration. This is important for applications such as the investigation of iron’s association with Alzheimer’s disease and for tracking of localised cancer treatments.

I am exposed to a diverse range of applications and new projects we are about to undertake include feasibility studies of LA-ICP-MS sampling for complex matrices, and the development of rapid and robust screening methods for health. Each new area brings new challenges to develop robust and traceable measurement methods and are driven by industry needs.

How is a typical day in your lab?

For an experimental day I tend to begin by configuring our LA-ICP-MS instrumentation (NWR213 coupled to either our Element 2, 8800 or one of our 7700s) for the particular application being run that week e.g. wet plasma, online addition etc. I switch all the instruments on and let them settle for an hour. This gives me enough time to head to the office and grab a cup of coffee and sort through a mountain of e-mails. I’ll then setup the experiment for the day.

I spend a considerable amount of time in the office working on data reduction and interpretation of the results from the experiments. This work is often broken up by some of my other requirements of laboratory organization, project planning and instrumentation acquisition. I also have many opportunities to discuss other project topics and science with my colleagues.

What common activities are organized in your research group?

Many people from the Inorganic, Organic and Purity teams will take coffee at 10:00 and 15:00. Almost all of the section will attend this event at 10:00 on a Friday. This is our unofficial cake day, where one member of the section is volunteered each week to bake a treat of their choice. A more complicated rule also exists in that if the pay day for that month is a Friday then we head out for lunch to enjoy an ‘Open Burger’ from the local pub. A small group of us also head to the pub on a Friday evening.

Inorganic team meetings are a monthly occurrence and are used to discuss company business, conferences, papers, projects and laboratory issues. We also have a presentation from one member of the group on their research, work or a new piece of instrumentation they are using. We also attend monthly science meetings for the section (comprised of Inorganic, Organic, Purity and Reference Materials) where two presentations are given from any team. Annually we have a Science and Social day dedicated to improving divisional communication and understanding. This brings together the Science and Innovation division under the Government Chemist.

What app/programs do you typically use?

I regularly use the Microsoft Office suite of programs, such as Excel and Word; I am also a keen user of Visio to create diagrams for papers, presentations or patents.

LGC has begun to adopt OneNote as a means to compliment the conventional lab book; with talk of trialing tablets in the lab to replace lab books completely. The suitability of this program for sharing of information has really shone through when multiple people are collaborating on the same project.

I use Igor Pro, and the add-in Iolite, to reduce my LA data. I find the graphical interface, and identification of transient data as a wave useful in processing. The support from the developers and community is fantastic; they are patient and efficient in helping those with limited coding experience like me. Images can be generated easily using Iolite from ICP data and laser log files.

How do you search for scientific information? How do you manage your bibliography?

I often use Google Scholar and ScienceDirect when searching for information. I also use RSS feeds to keep me updated on highlighted releases from the major journals in my field.

I download papers and arrange them into folders with descriptive headings; sub-folders are used to provide further description. Information is collated using the reference manager Mendeley (freeware). As the program is free I can continue to use it if I move from one institute to another, and the annotation/key word functions are useful.

What are your views on JAAS? Which type of articles do you prefer? Do you miss some content?

JAAS is one of the important journals in my field of research. I have published in JAAS and found the process intuitive; whilst the peer review process provides vital constructive comments.

I enjoy the diversity of the articles published in JAAS, and particularly enjoy those that discuss new instrumental developments.

What do you like and dislike the most about your work?

There are many aspects of my job that I like, however the one that ranks highest for me is the group of people I get to work with. The cultural diversity makes for a good social environment but their scientific expertise makes for a great learning environment.

As this is a commercial environment we are limited by the time we can dedicate to certain activities, meaning that I cannot spend a day or two investigating something strange I have observed, no matter how much I want to. However this does mean that I need to plan my work carefully and ensure maximum ulitlisation/efficiency.

I particularly enjoy the wide range of instrumentation that I have access to, whether this is on site or through collaboration with other institutes and universities.

What do you expect to be doing in 5 years time?

I would be happy to remain in my current employment as I can see many emerging opportunities within LGC. I also enjoy the projects and work that LGC undertake and feel that I can drive the solid sampling capability into new and interesting areas, whilst obtaining a vast amount of experience.

What do you enjoy doing when you are not in the lab?

I have many hobbies outside of my research and work; I believe it is important to keep the mind and body active with a variety of pastimes. When the weather is good I enjoy fishing, walking and photography and for when it is not so good (a common situation in UK) I have taken up woodworking. This has given me the pleasure of building toys and decorations for our first child.

Thanks a lot, David! Have a look at some recent work published by David in JAAS

Jennifer O’Reilly, David Douglas, Julian Braybrook, P.-W. So, Eva Vergucht, Jan Garrevoet, Bart Vekemans, Laszlo Vincze and Heidi Goenaga-Infante
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014,29, 1378-1384
DOI: 10.1039/C4JA00002A, Paper
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The Next Generation – An Interview with Ásta Heiðrún E. Pétursdóttir

We  begin the year interviewing Ásta Heiðrún E. Pétursdóttir, a post-doc at Matís (Iceland) who recently finished her PhD in Aberdeen under the supervision of Jörg Feldmann.

Ásta in her former lab in Aberdeen

Who or what inspired you to become a scientist?

I always enjoyed the Science subjects in school and college, so I decided to study Mathematics and Chemistry at University. After a couple of years I switched completely to Chemistry; we got to wear cool lab coats, safety goggles and do crazy science experiments in the lab.

Why did you choose your research group/University and what factors influenced your choice?

My MSc (University of Iceland) was based on arsenic and arsenic speciation and mainly took place at Matís, Iceland, which is a dynamic R&D company that among other things aims at ensuring safety and quality of food products. This suited well my research interests. I decided to go abroad for an exchange year via the ERASMUS program, to take courses and get in depth expert guidance in a research group intensively involved in speciation, which was then a new field in my group in Iceland. My supervisor at the time mentioned a few research groups doing arsenic speciation and of those Scotland sounded like a nice place. Rain, wind, mountains and sheep. So just like home.

A few months in I decided to stay and do a PhD in the group (TESLA group at the University of Aberdeen). I have to admit at that point I wasn’t sure if I wanted to do arsenic speciation for 3 more years, if I’d want to live in such a grey city, nor even if I wanted to stay abroad for so long. But the speciation grew on me and now I think it is fascinating, I like the city, I made amazing friends and I couldn’t have wished for a better supervisor. I see now that this was a pretty good decision. I finished my PhD this summer and I’m currently back in the research group in Iceland where the whole process started off, but now as a PostDoc, so I’ve come a circle. It was a good experience to go abroad for my studies, but it’s also great to be back in my old research group.

Can you explain a bit the purpose of your current research activities?

In my PhD I focused mainly on the speciation of inorganic arsenic, because of its toxicity and potential upcoming legislation on inorganic arsenic in food (e.g. rice) in Europe. I was interested in seeing what affected the determination of inorganic arsenic; the extraction? The instrumental method? None of the above? I did some method development and published a few papers on this. I also looked into lipid-soluble arsenic. It’s been an under researched area but is gaining more attention now. The arsenolipids are of interest since there are still so many unanswered questions regarding them. At the University of Aberdeen I had fantastic opportunities to study this, as there is extensive knowledge present within the group on this subject matter and unique combination of instrumentation facilitating easier determination of the arsenolipids. At the moment I’m continuing my work on inorganic arsenic, but would like to get back to the arsenolipids in the near future.

How is a typical day in your lab?

When I’m in the lab most time goes into sample preparation, analysis or method development. I’ve also been supervising students which I find enjoyable. I do spend a considerable time outside of the lab, working on data treatment, writing papers or grant proposals.

What common activities are organized in your research group?

In my current workplace we have regular division meetings where we discuss the recent developments within the group. We also have several social events planned each year, such as the recent Christmas dinner and in the autumn the whole company went on a staff trip, visiting interesting companies and we ended the day in the Blue Lagoon, a geo-thermal Lagoon/Spa – a great day out.

What app/programs do you typically use?

I mostly use Office (Word, Excel, Powerpoint etc), I also use statistical software such as SigmaStat, integration software (Origin) and instrumental ones such as Chemstation, Masshunter or Xcalibur.

How do you search for scientific information? How do you manage your bibliography?

I tend to use Web of Science for my research. Sometimes Scopus. I’ve been using Endnote to manage my bibliography.

What are your views on JAAS? Which type of articles do you prefer? Do you miss some content?

I haven’t published anything in JAAS so far, but I’m sure I will submit a manuscript there. It is one of the go to journals for ICP-MS work and many of the articles I read have been published in JAAS.

What do you like and dislike the most about your work?

I think most scientists agree that science can be very frustrating at times when nothing seems to work. Then as soon as things start working you forget all about that.

What I like is the diversity of my days, where I’m sometimes working hard in the lab and at others I’m thinking of new ideas for research projects. I also enjoy writing papers and the idea of getting my research across to other scientists.  I think my work is challenging and great for engaging with other people.

What do you expect to be doing in 5 years time?

I hope to be able to continue in my line of work and I would like to still work on my own research. I would be happy to be here at Matís in Iceland, the research facilities have grown recently with new instrumentation and I would like to familiarize myself with them with the prospect of using them for my work. I believe I would enjoy to manage different projects and supervise students.

What do you enjoy doing when you are not in the lab?

In my free time I hang out with family and friends, often trying to convince people to play board games with me. I play the clarinet and the piano as well. I also like to go climbing (bouldering) every now and then. Now that I have moved back to Iceland I try to the nice warm swimming pools as often as I can. They are lovely.

Thanks a lot, Ásta, and all the best for 2015!

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2015 European Winter Conference on Plasma Spectrochemistry themed issue

Graphical Abstract


We are delighted to announce that once again, JAAS will be publishing a themed issue from the 2015 Winter Conference on Plasma Spectrochemistry.

The submission deadline for the issue will be 10th April 2015, with the option of having your article published online as soon as it is accepted. The issue will be published online and in print in summer 2015. If you need any extra time to complete your manuscript, do let us know and we would be happy to discuss this with you.

We welcome the submission of communications, full papers and technical notes, and all articles will be subject to peer-review. If you are interested in writing a review article for the issue, please do not hesitate to contact me (jaas-rsc@rsc.org) or JAAS Editorial Board Chair, Frank Vanhaecke, to discuss a possible topic.

You can submit your article by uploading your manuscript through the journal website. Don’t forget to mention in your cover letter that you article is intended for the Winter Conference themed issue.

We look forward to reading your next article!

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