Archive for the ‘Board News’ Category

Introducing new JAAS Editorial Board member Dr George Havrilla

We are delighted to announce the appointment of Dr George Havrilla as a member of the JAAS Editorial Board.


George Havrilla is a scientist 5, in the Chemistry Division, at Los Alamos National Laboratory since 1993. His research efforts have included elemental analyses using X-ray fluorescence for bulk, mesoscale and microscale characterization. Before LANL he was at BP Research R&D Cleveland, Ohio and spent 2 years as an NAS/NRC postdoc at the National Bureau of Standards. He has a PhD from West Virginia University (1980) and 2 R&D 100 awards. He has developed novel XRF instruments including MXRF, confocal MXRF and hiRX along with many materials characterization methodologies. Current research interests include XRF applications to materials characterization and international safeguards.


We welcome Dr Havrilla and his expertise and experience to the JAAS Editorial Board. This appointment strenghtens the Board and we look forward to working with Dr Havrilla going forward.

You can keep up to date with the latest developments from JAAS by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

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New JAAS Editorial Chair: A few words with Martín Resano

Martin Resano

The new Chair of the Editorial Board for JAAS has been announced as Martín Resano. We recently had the opportunity to catch up with Martín and find out a bit more about him.

What are you most looking forward to in your new role as chair?

Besides working with very nice people, I think it is learning. Since I joined the Advisory Board and later the Editorial Board of JAAS, I have learnt a lot about how a Journal works and how all my colleagues do things in different ways. I expect the role as Chair will be even more formative. Plus, my wife is very proud of me!

What are your aims?

My aim is to try to further improve JAAS and leave it in a better situation than is now. Obviously, I have big shoes to fill, so it will not be easy. But JAAS community has always been like a family and we want to keep that, we want to keep the human contact in a Web 2.0 world, and we want to make it as easier and swift as possible for authors and reviewers, as well as provide further service (e.g. I like the new citation velocity addition!). I think there is still some room for improvement, for instance regarding proof corrections and MS promotion.

And there is always the inevitable IF. I think the current IF does not completely reflect the quality of the papers that JAAS publishes and I would like to see it going higher. Plus, former Editor and Publisher Niamh O’Connor jokingly (jokingly?) challenged me to beat the IF she achieved with Detlef Gunther as Chair (4.372 in 2010). Let’s see what we can do about that.

What direction do you see this research field moving in and what do you imagine will be the next big breakthrough?

As Bohr said, “Prediction is very difficult, especially if it’s about the future.”

I think atomic spectrometry is a bit dependent on instrumental and technological developments. This happens in all areas, but perhaps it is most obvious in ours, because only a few groups have the knowledge, support and access to resources to build such complex instruments. But we are good at taking advantage of the instruments we have, and even using them for purposes that significantly differ from those for which they were originally designed for, sometimes with very interesting outcomes.

So you can see new papers coming in some areas due to new needs (e.g., characterization of nanomaterials) but also because new instruments make it possible to develop new applications (e.g., new types of lasers, high-resolution continuum source AAS devices, ICP-MS/MS instruments, new XRF imaging applications based on synchrotrons). So it is hard to guess, because I think technologically it is possible to build better instrumentation right now, but the commercial impact has to be taken into account.

From a personal point of view, I would like to see a more powerful high-res continuum source AAS device, I am very curious about the potential of TOF devices for ICP-MS, and I would like to see the prices of fs lasers to finally drop.

And, overall, I think the difference between atomic and molecular spectrometry is becoming very subtle, as former Chair Frank Vanhaecke discussed in a recent JAAS editorial.

How do we encourage the next generation of analytical chemists?

Analytical chemistry is such an interdisciplinary field that enables you to work in any area you really like. Plus, the information we provide is not only useful, but often indispensable.

Whose work do you think is really exciting at the moment?

Everybody in our Editorial and Advisory Board is doing a great job. I feel very comfortable with the team we have, and I think it would be a bit unfair to highlight some group right now.

Instead, I prefer to talk a bit about the past. I grew up as a scientist admiring the work that former JAAS Chairs (such as Barry Sharp, Joe Caruso, Gary Hietfje, Detlef Gunther and Frank Vanhaecke) and other JAAS members (such as Ralph Sturgeon, Jim Holcombe, Bernhard Welz, Scott Tanner) did, and for me it has been a formidable experience and a wonderful journey to be able to not only meet them but to work with most of them. And most of them are still active and doing great Science!

Once again, we’d like to warmly welcome Martín. We’re looking forward to his term as Chair of the JAAS Editorial Board.

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In memory of Shan Gao

Professor Shan Gao

Recently, we received the very sad news that our former colleague and Editorial Board member Professor Shan Gao had passed away, only 53 years old.

Shan Gao was Professor of Geochemistry at the China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and part-time professor at Northwestern University. He received his doctor’s degree from the China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) in 1989 and was selected to be a fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry in 2009 and an academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2011. He also worked as associate editor and editorial board member of JAAS successively. His research mainly focused on laser ablation ICP-MS and its application in the analysis of minerals in situ elements and isotopes, chemical compositions of continental crust and the chemical exchange between the crust and mantle.

His contributions to these areas of research will be greatly missed and our thoughts are with his friends and family at this time.

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In memory of Joseph A. Caruso

Joseph Caruso

Professor Joseph Caruso

It is with great sadness that we share the news that our Advisory Board member and dear colleague Professor Joseph Caruso has recently passed away. Over the years he has been very active for the Royal Society of Chemistry and as well as serving as Chair for JAAS, he was the founding Chair for Metallomics, and became one of the leaders in this emerging area of exciting research.

During his career he was honoured with many awards including the American Chemical Society’s Cincinnati Chemist of the Year Award in 1992, the Federation of Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Society’s Anachem Award in 1994, and the Spectrochemical Analysis Award given by the Analytical Division of the American Chemical Society in 2000. More recently he received the Theophilus Redwood Lectureship Award from the Royal Society of Chemistry in 2013 and the Eastern Analytical Symposium Fields of Analytical Chemistry Award in 2014.

His contributions as a scientist, teacher, colleague and friend will be greatly missed.

Our thoughts are with his family at this time.

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Anakon 2015 and Awards to JAAS Board Members

The ANAKON, a joint conference of German-speaking analytical chemists, organized by the German Chemical Society (GDCh) took place in Graz, Austria, from March 23 to March 26, 2015.

JAAS Editorial Board Member and Online Community Editor Professor Martín Resano (University of Zaragoza), was awarded the prestigious Bunsen-Kirchhoff Preiss for Analytical Spectroscopy for his work on the development of atomic spectrometric techniques.

In addition, during the opening session, JAAS Advisory Board member Professor Detlef Günther (ETH Zürich) was awarded with the Emich Badge (Emich-Plakette) of the ASAC, for merits in micro-and analytical chemistry and his research on LA-ICP-MS.

Well done Martín and Detlef, congratulations on your awards!

An image showing Professor Martín Resano being awarded the Bunsen-Kirchhoff Preiss

Professor Detlef Günther being awarded with the Emich Badge

Professor Martín Resano being awarded the Bunsen-Kirchhoff Preiss Professor Detlef Günther being awarded with the Emich Badge

You can read some of the award winner’s papers below, which are free to access for the next few weeks.

Direct analysis of dried blood spots by femtosecond-laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Feasibility of split-flow laser ablation for simultaneous trace element and isotopic analysis
M. Aramendía, L. Rello, S. Bérail, A. Donnard, C. Pécheyran and M. Resano
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2015, 30, 296-309

Variable aperture extraction lens for ion beam investigation in inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry
Niko Kivel, Heiko-Dirk Potthast, Ines Günther-Leopold, Frank Vanhaecke and Detlef Günther
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2015, Advance Article

High-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for direct analysis of solid samples and complex materials: a tutorial review
Martín Resano, Maite Aramendía and Miguel A. Belarra
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, 29, 2229-2250

An internal standardisation strategy for quantitative immunoassay tissue imaging using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry
Daniel A. Frick, Charlotte Giesen, Teresa Hemmerle, Bernd Bodenmiller and Detlef Günther
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2015, 30, 254-259

Simultaneous determination of Co, Fe, Ni and Pb in carbon nanotubes by means of solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry
Martín Resano, Eduardo Bolea-Fernández, Engracia Mozas, María R. Flórez, Patricia Grinberg and Ralph E. Sturgeon
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2013, 28, 657-665

Comparison of 795 nm and 265 nm femtosecond and 193 nm nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the quantitative multi-element analysis of glass materials
Masaki Ohata, Daniel Tabersky, Reto Glaus, Joachim Koch, Bodo Hattendorf and Detlef Günther
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, 29, 1345-1353

Direct determination of Cu isotope ratios in dried urine spots by means of fs-LA-MC-ICPMS. Potential to diagnose Wilson’s disease
Martín Resano, Maite Aramendía, Luis Rello, Mª Luisa Calvo, Sylvain Bérail and Christophe Pécheyran
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2013, 28, 98-106

Development and characterization of custom-engineered and compacted nanoparticles as calibration materials for quantification using LA-ICP-MS
Daniel Tabersky, Norman A. Luechinger, Michael Rossier, Eric Reusser, Kathrin Hametner, Beat Aeschlimann, Daniel A. Frick, Samuel C. Halim, Jay Thompson, Leonid Danyushevsky and Detlef Günther
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, 29, 955-962

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In memory of Jan Košler

Recently, we received the very sad and unexpected news that our Advisory Board member Professor Jan Košler had passed away, only 49 years old.

Jan Kosler

Professor Jan Košler, Photograph: University of Bergen

Jan graduated from Charles University, Prague, in 1988 and went on to do his PhD in Glasgow, Scotland, where he finished in 1993. He became lecturer, and in 2003, Associate Professor at Charles University, Prague. During this period, he spent one year in Memorial University, Canada and two years in Bergen as a visiting research fellow. In 2005 he got an Associate Professorship at the Department of Earth Science of the University of Bergen and became a full professor there in 2007. During his time in Bergen, Jan spent one year at University of Vienna, Austria, and this last year at the Geological Survey of Canada in Ottawa, Canada.

As an internationally respected analytical geochemist, Jan had a particular research interest in isotope geochemistry, isotopic dating and mass spectrometry development, particularly in natural small-scale isotope ratio variations. In his research, he made use of various micro-beam techniques, such as laser ablation ICP-MS or secondary ion mass spectrometry, and he was regarded as a leading expert in this field. His research focus spanned from hydrothermal mineral deposits on the Mid-Atlantic ridge to the use of isotope geochemistry for deciphering the provenance of sediments and the evolution and cycling of crustal rocks in orogenic belts. He had an enviable track record of publishing innovative analytical developments.

Jan was a principal investigator on a number of projects and had broad international networks. As part of his research, he carried out field work in Europe, Africa, South America and Western Antarctica. Besides being an outstanding scientist, he had broad teaching experiences, in petrology, mineralogy, geochemistry, isotope geology and laser ablation techniques. Jan was a respected and very well-liked teacher and supervisor.

JAAS has always appreciated Jan’s efforts for the well-being of the journal and for convincing his fellow geochemists to publish their analytical developments in our journal. We will all miss Jan’s friendly face on the conferences we attend, as well as the stimulating scientific discussions and social talks with him. With Jan Košler the scientific community is losing a dedicated colleague and a very good friend.

Our thoughts are with his family, his wife Alena and his son and daughter.

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New JAAS Editorial Chair: A few words with Frank Vanhaecke

Since the announcement of Frank Vanhaecke becoming the new Chair of the Editorial Board for JAAS, we’ve had the opportunity to have a little chat with our incoming Chair.

What are your aims? First and foremost, I’ll be aiming to continue the fantastic efforts of my predecessors, Detlef and Gary being the most recent!

Any goals for your term as Chair? To stimulate the publication of even more original interdisciplinary research involving atomic spectrometry in JAAS e.g., from the fields of biomedicine and geochemistry, whilst preserving the attention for fundamental topics. We would also like to encourage more authors who are working in the development of techniques for elemental research such as synchrotron radiation XRF, X-ray absorption spectrometry XAS and isotope ratio mass spectrometry IRMS.

Anything else? Our primary goal of course has to be to further strengthen the position of JAAS as the leading journal exclusively devoted to atomic spectrometry in the community.

We’d of course like to welcome Frank once again, and we’re looking forward to his term as Chair of the JAAS Editorial Board.

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2012 Strock Award for JAAS Advisory Board member Ralph Sturgeon

Professor Ralph SturgeonThe Society for Applied Spectroscopy (SAS) and the Federation of Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Societies (FACSS) have announced that JAAS Advisory Board member Professor Ralph Sturgeon of the National Research Council, Canada, has been selected as the recipient of the New England Section of the SAS’s 2012 Lester W. Strock Award.

This award has been established by the New England Section and is given annually to an author in recognition of a selected publication of substantive research in/or application of analytical atomic spectrochemistry in the fields of earth science, life sciences, or stellar and cosmic sciences.

Professor Sturgeon will present the Strock Award Plenary Lecture entitled “Vapor Generation – Make It Your Second Thought for Sample Introduction” on Thursday October 4th at the SciX conference in Kansas, USA.

Ralph follows in the footsteps of other JAAS Board members as recipient of this award, including Gary Hieftje, John Olesik, Detlef Günther and Annemie Bogaerts.

Congratulations, Ralph!

Take a look at a few of Ralph’s recent papers in JAAS below:

Perspective: Some speculations on the mechanisms of photochemical vapor generation
Ralph E. Sturgeon and Patricia Grinberg
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2012,27, 222-231
DOI: 10.1039/C2JA10249H

Technical Note: UV photochemical generation of volatile cadmium species
Joaquim A. Nóbrega, Ralph E. Sturgeon, Patricia Grinberg, Graeme J. Gardner, Christine S. Brophy and Edivaldo E. Garcia
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2011,26, 2519-2523
DOI: 10.1039/C1JA10252D

Critical Review: Applications of chemical vapor generation in non-tetrahydroborate media to analytical atomic spectrometry
Peng Wu, Liang He, Chengbin Zheng, Xiandeng Hou and Ralph E. Sturgeon
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2010,25, 1217-1246
DOI: 10.1039/C003483E
From themed issue 2010 Winter Conference on Plasma Spectrochemistry

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New Editorial Board Chair for JAAS: Frank Vanhaecke

After four wonderful years, Detlef Guenther is stepping down as the Chair of the JAAS Editorial Board. We would like to take this opportunity to thank Detlef for all of his hard work and dedication to the journal and look forward to his continued contributions as an Advisory Board member. And while we will miss him, we wish him all the very best for his future endeavors.

We are pleased to announce that the new Chair for JAAS is Frank Vanhaecke, from Ghent University, Belgium. Frank’s main research interests lie in the determination, speciation and isotopic analysis of trace elements using ICP-MS. He is especially interested in the direct analysis of solid materials using both ETV-ICPMS and LA-ICPMS, chemical and high mass resolution for overcoming spectral interferences and isotope ratio determination using single- and multi-collector ICPMS.

As an experienced Editorial Board member for the journal, Frank is fully qualified to be filling Detlef’s shoes, and we are very much looking forward to his term as Chair.

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Arsenic-resistant bacterium still needs phosphate for growth

A paper co-authored by JAAS Editorial Board Chair, Detlef Günther has been published in Science and contributes to an ongoing discussion on the role of arsenic in the bacterial isolate GFAJ-1.

In December 2010, Felisa Wolfe-Simon and colleagues published a paper, also in Science, which proposed that GFAJ-1 could substitute small amounts of phosphorus in its DNA with arsenic. This claim would have significant implications for our understanding of life, since all known forms of life on Earth typically use oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, phosphorus and sulfur.

This new work from Detlef and fellow researchers at ETH Zürich shows that GFAJ-1 is able to grow at low phosphate concentrations even under high arsenate concentrations, but cannot grow in phosphorus-depleted, arsenate-containing medium. They combined physiological experiments with ICP-OES and ICP-MS to provide evidence that whilst GFAJ-1 is highly resistant to arsenate, but still requires phosphate for growth. The authors say that the molecular basis for arsenate resistance in GFAJ-1 could be the subject of further investigations.

GFAJ-1 Is an Arsenate-Resistant, Phosphate-Dependent Organism
Tobias J. Erb, Patrick Kiefer, Bodo Hattendorf, Detlef Günther, Julia A. Vorholt
DOI: 10.1126/science.1218455

Also published in Science is a paper from Rosie Redfield and colleagues at Princeton University, which supports the conclusions from the ETH group:

Absence of Detectable Arsenate in DNA from Arsenate-Grown GFAJ-1 Cells
Marshall Louis Reaves, Sunita Sinha, Joshua D. Rabinowitz, Leonid Kruglyak, Rosemary J. Redfield
DOI: 10.1126/science.1219861

Though not quite as controversial, take a look at some recent content in JAAS on arsenic:

Technical Note: Rapid screening of arsenic species in urine from exposed human by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with germanium as internal standard
A. Castillo,  C. Boix,  N. Fabregat,  A. F. Roig-Navarro and J. A. Rodríguez-Castrillón
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2012, 27, 354-358
DOI: 10.1039/C1JA10289C

An interlaboratory study of arsenic speciation analysis of whole blood
Kanna Ito,  Walter Goessler,  Hakan Gürleyük,  Brian Wels,  Christopher D. Palmer,  Mary Frances Verostek and Patrick J. Parsons
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2011, 26, 1740-1745
DOI: 10.1039/C1JA10040H

Intracellular, time-resolved speciation and quantification of arsenic compounds in human urothelial and hepatoma cells
Joerg Hippler,  Ricarda Zdrenka,  Robin A. D. Reichel,  Daniel G. Weber,  Peter Rozynek,  Georg Johnen,  Elke Dopp and Alfred V. Hirner
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2011, 26, 2396-2403
DOI: 10.1039/C1JA10150A

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