Poster prize winner at BIO UT 2015

held on 27th June 2015

The 15th University of Tokyo Life Science Network Symposium BIO UT 2015 was held at the University of Tokyo, Japan, on June 27th, 2015. The symposium covered all aspects of life science from biotechnology, bioengineering, cell biology to bioinformatics, developmental biology and environmental biology.

Our journal Integrative Biology awarded a poster prize in BIO UT 2015, which included a certificate and a fantastic £50 RSC Book Voucher.

We are pleased to announced that the winner is:

Daniela Serien, University of Tokyo, Japan for her poster entitled

3D Proteinaceous Microstructures by Direct Laser Writing

from the left, Hiromitsu Urakami (RSC Japan), Daniela Serien (Integrative Biology poster prize winner), and Madoka Takai (University of Tokyo, Committee Chair)

Congratulations to Daniela!

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Poster prize winners at ISMM 2015

The ISMM (International Symposium on Microchemistry and Microsystems) is a series of symposia that started in Kanazawa, Japan in 2009. The 7th  ISMM was held at Kyoto University at Katsura, Japan during 8-10 June, 2015. The symposium mainly focused on separation science, microfluidic technologies, nano-bio devices, biomedicine, microsensors and micro-nano engineering.

Two poster prizes were awarded by Integrative Biology and Lab on a Chip in ISMM2015. The prizes included a certificate and £50 RSC Book Voucher.

We are pleased to announce that the winners are:

Sayuri Arai, Nayoga University, Japan (Integrative Biology prize)

Wojciech P. Bula, Tokyo University, Japan (Lab on a Chip prize)

Prof. Hideaki Hisamoto (very left), Wojciech P. Bula (third from left) and Sayuri Arai (very right) at ISMM 2015

The title of Sayuri Arai’s poster was ‘A single cell culture system for Cyanobacteria using magnetic force based cell patterning’ and Wojciech’s poster was entitled ‘Low-cost modular microfluidic platform based on 3D printing technology’. The prizes were awarded by  Prof. Hideaki Hisamoto of Osaka Prefecture University.

Congratulations to Sayuri and Wojciech!

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May’s HOT Article

Article of the month for May, recommended by our referees, is free* to access for a limited time only!


Human breast cancer invasion and aggression correlates with ECM stiffening and immune cell infiltration

I. Acerbi, L. Cassereau, I. Dean, Q. Shi, A. Au, C. Park, Y. Y. Chen, J. Liphardt, E. S. Hwang and V. M. Weaver
Integr. Biol., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5IB00040H

This article was part of our Mechanobiology themed collection!

*Access is free until 24.07.2015 through a publishing personal account. It’s quick, easy and free to register!

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Microfluidic approach to personalised cancer treatment

As part of the united effort to make healthcare technology smaller, better and cheaper, scientists in the US have developed an innovative microfluidic assay that can accurately predict how patients with a certain type of blood cancer will respond to an anticancer drug.

Cancer therapy, like the treatment of other medical conditions, often involves a degree of trial and error in the quest to find the best therapeutic option for each patient. What works for one individual will not necessarily work for another. The future of medicine lies in personalised diagnosis and treatments. Bypassing the use of often unsuccessful and sometimes potentially harmful drugs, and instead tailoring the treatment to each individual, will reduce the time and resources required to successfully treat patients.

Currently, chemosensitivity and resistance assays (CSRAs) are used to predict a patient’s response to a specific drug. However, these CSRAs are not always 100% reliable and do not take into account the influence of non-tumour cells in the overall prediction of treatment success. This is an important consideration as anticancer drugs will affect both tumour and non-tumour cells.

‘The validation of an ex vivo drug screen device for personalised medicine is a constant and tough challenge because an accurate standard just does not exist, and using patients’ clinical data for validation is an ultimate route we must go through’, explains Sihong Wang, a biomedical engineering expert at the City University of New York, US, who was not involved in the study.

To read more, check out Thadchajini Retneswaran’s Chemistry World article here or read the full paper online:

MicroC3: an ex vivo microfluidic cis-coculture assay to test chemosensitivity and resistance of patient multiple myeloma cells
Chorom Pak, Natalie S. Callander, Edmond W. K. Young, Benjamin Titz, KyungMann Kim, Sandeep Saha, Kenny Chng, Fotis Asimakopoulos, David J. Beebe and Shigeki Miyamoto
Integr. Biol., 2015
DOI: 10.1039/C5IB00071H

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Implications in diabetes explored with a 3D-printed fluidic device

Rebecca Muir writes about tissue-tissue communication in her first blog post for Integrative Biology…

Type 1 Diabetes has confused doctors for centuries. Characterised by the auto-immune destruction of pancreatic beta cells, sudden and debilitating symptoms can arise without insulin treatment. Insulin is only one amongst three known hormones produced by the beta cell, leading researchers at Michigan State University (MSU) to examine one of these mysterious molecules, called C-peptide.

The life expectancy of a person with type-1 diabetes has increased significantly compared to pre-20th century, but unfortunately chronic complications still may develop, such as heart disease, nerve damage and retinopathy. However, there is evidence that short-term replacement of C-peptide could improve the progression of the disease, by enhancing the ability of red blood cells to affect blood flow. Using a 3D-printed fluidic device, Researchers at MSU tested the hypothesis that C-peptide combined with a charged form of zinc (Zn2+) would cause blood vessel dilation, by increasing the amounts of ATP, an energy-carrier molecule shown to stimulate the vessel dilator nitric oxide (NO).

The 3D-printed fluidic device provides an experimental model for investigating cellular communication in the pancreas. Red blood cells flowed in the albumin-containing buffer under INS-1 cells and ATP release was measured.

This platform allowed the researchers to examine the tissue-tissue communication between rat INS-1 cells (which can serve as a beta-cell mimic) and a blood vessel-like endothelium, a currently impossible task to achieve in vivo.

Initially it was thought that Zn2+ facilitated delivery of C-peptide to the red blood cells, but it was soon found the delivery was actually enhanced by Albumin, a peptide carrier in the bloodstream.

However, red blood cells incubated with C-peptide alone did not show a significant ATP increase – they found it is in fact a joint effort, where both zinc and C-peptide are delivered by albumin to the endothelium. This suggests that the next steps are to test zinc, C-peptide and albumin combinational treatment alongside insulin, and to identify the C-peptide receptor itself.

The full article is free to access until 3 July 2015 and can be found on the link below:

C-peptide and zinc delivery to erythrocytes requires the presence of albumin: implications in diabetes explored with a 3D-printed fluidic device

Yueli Liu, Chengpeng Chen, Suzanne Summers, Wathsala Medawala and Dana M. Spence

Integr. Biol., 2015,7, 534-543
DOI: 10.1039/C4IB00243A
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April’s HOT Article

Article of the month for April, recommended by our referees, is free* to access for a limited time only!

Two macrocyclic polyamines as modulators of metal-mediated Aβ40 aggregation
Yanfei Yang, Tingting Chen, Shajun Zhu, Xuefang Gu, Xueping Jia, Yapeng Lub and Li Zhu
Integr. Biol., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5IB00064E, Paper

Take a look at our Integrative Biology 2014 HOT Articles Collection!

*Access is free until 29.06.2015 through a publishing personal account. It’s quick, easy and free to register!

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March’s HOT Article

Article of the month for March, recommended by our referees, is free* to access for a limited time only!

Analysis of sphingosine kinase activity in single natural killer cells from peripheral blood

Alexandra J. Dickinson, Megan Meyer, Erica A. Pawlak, Shawn Gomez, Ilona Jaspers and Nancy L. Allbritton

Integr. Biol., 2015, 7, 392-401
DOI: 10.1039/C5IB00007F, Paper

Take a look at our Integrative Biology 2014 HOT Articles Collection!

*Access is free until 31.05.2015 through a publishing personal account. It’s quick, easy and free to register!

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Capillary electrophoresis to analyse enzymatic pathways in natural killer cells

Webwriter Claire Weston @imperialcollege writes more…

Natural killer (NK) cells are a type of lymphocyte that are vitally important in the body’s immune response. These cells show high levels of heterogeneity, with an estimated 6000 to 30000 distinct subsets in the circulating blood of just one person. Because of this, technologies are needed that are capable of measuring single cells.

Allbritton and co-workers, at the University of North Carolina, have reported a method for doing just this using an automated single-cell capillary electrophoresis (CE) system. This system works by capturing individual NK cells in cell traps (consisting of 15µm diameter microwells) and positioning a capillary above one of the cell traps. The cell is lysed using a laser pulse and the cellular contents are injected into the capillary electrokinetically. The capillary is programmed to transfer the cellular contents to the electrophoretic buffer, where separation occurs. The capillary then moves back to the next cell trap and repeats the process.

The work in this paper focuses on the spingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) pathway (shown in the diagram below), which is important in the regulation of lymphocyte migration and differentiation, and cytokine production. Fluorescently labelled sphingosine was loaded into the NK cells of healthy human subjects and, following incubation, the cells were loaded onto the microwells and analysed using the single-cell CE system. The amount of each metabolite present was then identified from the electropherogram. The authors identified three major peaks, corresponding to fluorescently labelled sphingosine, S1P and hexadecanoic acid.  From the relative amounts of each metabolite, the activity of various enzymes in the S1P pathway were assessed.

The activity within the S1P pathway was found to be highly heterogeneous in NK cells obtained from one individual, as well as those from different subjects. In the majority of cells, phosphorylation of sphingosine was upregulated relative to the breakdown of S1P. No peaks were seen that corresponded to the ceramide metabolite, suggesting that in healthy humans, sphingosine is metabolised to S1P more rapidly.

By increasing the throughput of the automated system and preparing additional fluorescent reporters, this automated CE system has the potential to provide a more comprehensive picture of an individual cell’s signalling pathways.



To download the full article for free* click the link below:
Analysis of sphingosine kinase activity in single natural killer cells from peripheral blood
Alexandra J. DickinsonMegan MeyerErica A. PawlakShawn GomezIlona Jaspers and Nancy L. Allbritton
DOI: 10.1039/C5IB00007F


*Access is free until 31.05.2014 through a registered publishing personal account

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February’s HOT Article

Article of the month for February, recommended by our referees, is free* to access for a limited time only!

Human-on-a-chip design strategies and principles for physiologically based pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics modeling
Hasan Erbil Abaci and Michael L. Shuler
Integr. Biol., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4IB00292J, Critical Review

Take a look at our Integrative Biology 2014 HOT Articles Collection!

*Access is free until 30.04.2015 through a publishing personal account. It’s quick, easy and free to register!

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January’s HOT Article

Article of the month for January, recommended by our referees, is free* to access for a limited time only!

Graphical Abstract

Magnetic engineering of stable rod-shaped stem cell aggregates: circumventing the pitfall of self-bending
V. Du, D. Fayol, M. Reffay, N. Luciani, J-C. Bacri, C. Gay and C. Wilhelm
Integr. Biol., 2015,7, 170-177
DOI: 10.1039/C4IB00219A

Take a look at our Integrative Biology 2015 HOT Articles Collection!

 

*Access is free through a publishing personal account. It’s quick, easy and free to register!

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