Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Single Cell Science and Technology Microfluidics Symposium 2017

Single Cell Science and Technology
Microfluidics Symposium 2017
May 3, 2017, 11:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.
NCRC Bldg. 10 Auditorium, Bldg. 18 – Dining Hall


Also including presentations by University of Michigan Faculty and Students

Call for Abstracts for Poster Session
To be considered for podium presentation, submit by March 31, 2017
Deadline for all abstracts: April 18, 2017
Poster Information/Submission: metzlerp@umich.edu
Poster prizes sponsored by MCIRCC and RSC Publishing

 

For more information, see their flyer and click here to register

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Top 10 most accessed Integrative Biology articles in June 2015

In June 2015, our most downloaded Integrative Biology articles were:

Alexis J. Carulli, Linda C. Samuelson and Santiago Schnell
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40163D

Miguel Coelho, Nicola Maghelli and Iva M. Tolic-Nørrelykke
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40018B

Sudong Kim, Hyung Joon Kim and Noo Li Jeon
DOI: 10.1039/C0IB00055H

Chorom Pak, Natalie S. Callander, Edmond W. K. Young, Benjamin Titz, KyungMann Kim, Sandeep Saha, Kenny Chng, Fotis Asimakopoulos, David J. Beebe and Shigeki Miyamoto
DOI: 10.1039/C5IB00071H

Jennifer J. Linderman, Nicholas A. Cilfone, Elsje Pienaar, Chang Gong and Denise E. Kirschner
DOI: 10.1039/C4IB00295D

Etheresia Pretorius and Douglas B. Kell
DOI: 10.1039/C4IB00025K

Kyung-Jin Jang, Ali Poyan Mehr, Geraldine A. Hamilton, Lori A. McPartlin, Seyoon Chung, Kahp-Yang Suh and Donald E. Ingber
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40049B

Elod Méhes and Tamás Vicsek
DOI: 10.1039/C4IB00115J

T. A. Banks, P. S. B. Luckman, J. E. Frith and J. J. Cooper-White
DOI: 10.1039/C4IB00297K

J. Bagnall, C. Boddington, J. Boyd, R. Brignall, W. Rowe, N. A. Jones, L. Schmidt, D. G. Spiller, M. R. H. White and P. Paszek
DOI: 10.1039/C5IB00067J

Interesting read? Let us know your thoughts below.

And remember, you can submit directly to Integrative Biology!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

February’s HOT Article

Article of the month for February, recommended by our referees, is free* to access for a limited time only!

Human-on-a-chip design strategies and principles for physiologically based pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics modeling
Hasan Erbil Abaci and Michael L. Shuler
Integr. Biol., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4IB00292J, Critical Review

Take a look at our Integrative Biology 2014 HOT Articles Collection!

*Access is free until 30.04.2015 through a publishing personal account. It’s quick, easy and free to register!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Circulating Tumor Cells: The bad, the worse and the worst

Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cells that begin as part of a tumor, but then break free into the bloodstream of a patient. It is thought that these cells can initiate metastases elsewhere in the body, but the question remains: are all CTCs able to create new tumors? A research collaboration between several schools in Massachusetts created an assay to detect these malignant CTCs on an individual basis, as reported in the April 2014 cover article of Integrative Biology.

Previously, only entire populations of CTCs were examined, and therefore it could not be determined if all cells or only a subset contributed to metastasis. To be classified as metastasis causing a cell needs to;

  • beviable after breaking off from the tumor,
  • be able to invade new tissue,
  • secrete active proteases associated with cancer cells.

The new assay uses nano wells to isolate individual CTCs or small clusters from blood samples of cancer patients. The viability and location of the cell over time (a measure of invasiveness) were determined by fluorescence analysis, while the secreted compounds of the same cells were detected with antibodies.

Figure 1 below shows functional measurements of viability, invasion and secretory profiles of CTCs using arrays of nanowells. (a) Scheme for the enrichment and functional characterization of CTCs using nanowells for (1) viability, (2) invasion, or (3) secretion of soluble factors. (b) Scatter plot (left) is generated from on-chip imaging cytometry of 50 C4-2 cells spiked into 5 ml of whole blood. Image analysis software extracted the fluorescence intensities of all the cells on the array, and plotted as a scatter plot similar to that used in flow cytometry. A single cell can be mapped back to its original image (middle) or secretion event determined by microengraving (right) based on its unique well ID. (c) Efficiency of recovery of tumor cells from whole blood is about 30% using spiked HT29 and C4-2 cells.

In comparing the number of persistent CTCs with patient outcomes, the researchers found that larger numbers of viable cells may be correlated to poor outcomes. Surprisingly, they found that the invasiveness of CTCs ranged from no movement at all to 100 μm for a single patient’s cells. This shows that not all CTCs have identical properties, and some are indeed more invasive, and therefore more likely to cause metastases. Approximately 2% of CTCs were found to possess malignant traits, demonstrating the need for individual screening.

The researchers also note that there is a high level of apoptosis and dormancy present in a population of CTCs. This presents an additional challenge for treatment, as dormant cells can lead to residual and/or recurrent disease in patients. Combined with the rarity of dangerous CTCs, it is understandable that traditional chemotherapies are often not enough.


Read the full paper by downloading your copy using the following link:

Functional analysis of single cells identifies a rare subset of circulating tumor cells with malignant traits – Cover Article, Integrative Biology, 2014, 6, 388

Xiaosai Yao, Atish D. Choudhury, Yvonne J. Yamanaka, Viktor A. Adalsteinsson, Todd M. Gierahn, Christina A. Williamson, Carla R. Lamb, Mary-Ellen Taplin, Mari Nakabayashi, Matthew S. Chabot, Tiantian Li, Gwo-Shu M. Lee, Jesse S. Boehm, Philip W. Kantoff, William C. Hahn, K. Dane Wittrup and J. Christopher Love

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Women in Science – Integrative Biology introduces two new Board members

Here at Integrative Biology we are happy to announce two new Editorial Board members, who will join our current team of high profile scientists from around the world, adding new insight and expertise to the mix.

Both from the USA, Shayn Peirce-Cottler, Virginia Biomedical Engineering, and Christina Smolke, Stanford School of Medicine, have between them published over 100 peer reviewed articles, in journals including Science, PNAS, Cell and Nature Biotechnology. Read on to learn more about our two latest team members…



Shayn Peirce-Cottler studied her undergraduate course at John Hopkins University before going onto complete her PhD in biomedical engineering at the University of Virginia. Shayn now works as an Associate Professor at Virginia, where she is the Principal Investigator in her lab researching vascular and tissue systems engineering. Shayn’s lab group combine experimental models with computational models to develop new approaches in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

Within this broad framework, the group has a particular focus on the microcirculatory system and the adaptation of microvascular networks in both health and disease. Recent publication successes have focused on multi-scale computational modeling of blood vessel growth and adaptation, the role of immune cells during arteriogenesis in the setting of bioimplants and tissue ischemia, and the therapeutic potential of stem cells in vascular regeneration.

In addition to her research group, Shayn is a member of the Cardiovascular Research Centre, which was established to expand basic, translational and clinical research in cardiovascular diseases.



Christina Smolke studied at the University of South California before moving to UC Berkely for post-graduate study. Christina now runs her own lab group at Stanford University, where the focus is on complex gene regulatory networks and the development of sophisticated gene expression technologies. Her group make use of interdisciplinary approaches, which include biomolecular design, synthetic biology and cellular engineering, with research spanning the disciplines of biochemistry, molecular biology, chemical biology and bioengineering.


In 2006, Christina was awarded the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, followed by the World Technology Award in Biotechnology by the World Technology Network, in 2009. Recent publications from Christina’s group have focused on chemical biology of aptamers, signaling networks in cell fate, the molecular tools for chemical biotechnology and synthetic genetic systems.




Do some of Shayn or Christina’s research interests fit with your own? If so, we’d like to hear from you! Find out more about the scope of the journal here, or send your abstract for consideration to ibiology-rsc@rsc.org.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Free to access HOT articles!

These HOT articles were recommended by our referees and are free to access for 4 weeks*

Microfluidic interrogation and mathematical modeling of multi-regime calcium signaling dynamics
Andreja Jovic, Susan M. Wade, Richard R. Neubig, Jennifer J. Linderman and Shuichi Takayama  
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40032H

GA

Molecular mechanisms of biomaterial-driven osteogenic differentiation in human mesenchymal stromal cells
Ana M. C. Barradas, Veronica Monticone, Marc Hulsman, Charlène Danoux, Hugo Fernandes, Zeinab Tahmasebi Birgani, Florence Barrère-de Groot, Huipin Yuan, Marcel Reinders, Pamela Habibovic, Clemens van Blitterswijk and Jan de Boer
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40027A

GA

Cells, tissues, and organs on chips: challenges and opportunities for the cancer tumor microenvironment
Edmond W. K. Young  
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40076J

GA

Microfluidic technique to measure intratumoral transport and calculate drug efficacy shows that binding is essential for doxorubicin and release hampers Doxil
Bhushan J. Toley, Zachary G. Tropeano Lovatt, Josephine L. Harrington and Neil S. Forbes
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40021B

GA

Integrated experimental and computational approach to understand the effects of heavy ion radiation on skin homeostasis
Claere von Neubeck, Harish Shankaran, Matthew J. Geniza, Paula M. Kauer, R. Joe Robinson, William B. Chrisler and Marianne B. Sowa  
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40071A

GA

Transfection in the third dimension
Anandika Dhaliwal, Victor Oshita and Tatiana Segura 
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40086G

GA

Change of laminin density stimulates axon branching via growth cone myosin II-mediated adhesion
Wenwen Liu, Shige Xing, Bo Yuan, Wenfu Zheng and Xingyu Jiang  
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40131F

GA

Chemical principles for the design of a novel fluorescent probe with high cancer-targeting selectivity and sensitivity
Chi-Chih Kang, Wei-Chun Huang, Chiung-Wen Kouh, Zi-Fu Wang, Chih-Chien Cho, Cheng-Chung Chang, Chiung-Lin Wang, Ta-Chau Chang, Joachim Seemann and Lily Jun-shen Huang 
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40058A

GA

A label-free optical biosensor with microfluidics identifies an intracellular signalling wave mediated through the β2-adrenergic receptor
Ann M. Ferrie, Chaoming Wang, Huayun Deng and Ye Fang  
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40112J

GA

Mechanisms of tumor cell extravasation in an in vitro microvascular network platform
Michelle B. Chen, Jordan A. Whisler, Jessie S. Jeon and Roger D. Kamm  
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40149A

GA

*Free access to individuals is provided through an RSC Publishing personal account. It’s quick, simple and more importantly – free – to register!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Integrative Biology: The Most Cited Articles of 2010 and 2011

Here at Integrative Biology, we would like to tell you about our most cited articles of 2010 and 2011, and to showcase some of the amazing and influential work that our authors have recently produced; a big congratulations to all.   

As of now, all of the below articles will be free for 4 weeks (until Monday 16th Sept),* so make the most of this opportunity to download the full papers!   


 Top 3 Cited Reviews:   

  1. S Kim et. al.: Biological applications of microfluidic gradient devices (DOI: 10.1039/c0ib00055h).

    A critical review discussing the emergence of microfluidics-based gradient generators and their applications in enhancing our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including chemotaxis and morphogenesis.

     


  2. A Pathak et. al.: Biophysical regulation of tumor cell invasion: moving beyond matrix stiffness (DOI: 10.1039/c0ib00095g).

    A critical review discussing the study of 3D extracellular matrix in cancer metastasis, with emphasis on the cell-matrix mechanical interactions that underlie the process of cell motility.

     


  3. CY Li et. al.: CFTR chloride channel in the apical compartments: spatiotemporal coupling to its interacting partners (DOI: 10.1039/b924455g).

    A critical review on CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) and our current understanding its interactions with binding partners through PDZ scaffolding proteins.

      


 Top 10 Cited Research Papers:     

  1. JB Delehanty et. al.: Delivering quantum dot-peptide bioconjugates to the cellular cytosol: escaping from the endolysosomal system (DOI: 10.1039/c0ib00002g).

    A study exploring a range of methods for the delivery of luminescent quantum dots to the cellular cytosol. Delehanty and colleagues demonstrated that an amphiphilic peptide designed to mediate cell penetration and vesicle membrane interactions could mediate rapid quantum dot uptake by endocytosis.



     
  2. CM Nelson et. al.: Endogenous patterns of mechanical stress are required for branching morphogenesis (DOI: 10.1039/c0ib00040j).

    A paper showing that the pattern of branching morphogenesis of three-dimensional engineered epithelial tissues is controlled in part by gradients of endogenous mechanical stress. 

     


  3. T Ellis et. al.: DNA assembly for synthetic biology: from parts to pathways and beyond (DOI: 10.1039/c0ib00070a).

    A frontier paper on the assembly of large DNA constructs and its limitations in advancing synthetic biology. This review provides a critical examination of recent DNAassembly strategies and considers how this important facilitating aspect of synthetic biology may proceed in the future.

     


  4. KT Yong et. al.: Synthesis of ternary CuInS2/ZnS quantum dot bioconjugates and their applications for targeted cancer bioimaging (DOI: 10.1039/b916663g)

  5. JP Jung et. al.: Multifactorial optimization of endothelial cell growth using modular synthetic extracellular matrices (DOI: 10.1039/c0ib00112k)

  6. E Tumarkin et. al.: High-throughput combinatorial cell co-culture using microfluidics (DOI: 10.1039/c1ib00002k)

  7. L Rodriguez-Lorenzo et. al.: Intracellular mapping with SERS-encoded gold nanostars (DOI: 10.1039/c1ib00029b)

  8.  DE Ingber et. al.: Ultra-rapid activation of TRPV4 ion channels by mechanical forces applied to cell surface beta 1 integrins (DOI: 10.1039/c0ib00034e)

  9. JI Lopez et. al.: In situ force mapping of mammary gland transformation (DOI: 10.1039/c1ib00043h)

  10. KR Sung et. al.: Transition to invasion in breast cancer: a microfluidic in vitro model enables examination of spatial and temporal effects (DOI: 10.1039/c0ib00063a)

     

 *free through an RSC account

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Take 1.. minute for chemistry in health

Do you know how chemical scientists can tackle global challenges in Human Health? If so, the RSC is running a one minute video competition this summer for young researchers such as PhD and Post-doc students; get involved and innovate the way scientists share their research. Your video should communicate your own personal research or an area of research that interests you, highlighting its significance and impact to Human Health.

Five videos will be shortlisted by our judging panel and the winner will be selected during the ‘How does chemistry keep us healthy?’ themed National Chemistry Week taking place 16-23 November. 

A £500 prize and a fantastic opportunity to shadow the award winning video Journalist, Brady Harran, is up for grabs for the winner.

The judging panel will include the makers of The Periodic Tale of Videos, Martyn Poliakoff and Brady Harran, and RSC Division representatives.

Check out our webpage for further details of the competition and an example video. 

The competition will open 02 April 2013 and the closing date for entries is 01 July 2013. Please submit your entries to rsc.li/take-1-video-competition.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Top ten most accessed IB articles in January 2013

This month sees the following articles in Integrative Biology that are in the top ten most accessed:-

Mesoporous silica nanoparticles: A multifunctional nano therapeutic system 
Wilson X. Mai and Huan Meng  
Integr. Biol., 2013, 5, 19-28 
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20137B   

Screening therapeutic EMT blocking agents in a three-dimensional microenvironment 
Amir R. Aref, Ruby Yun-Ju Huang, Weimiao Yu, Kian-Ngiap Chua, Wei Sun, Ting-Yuan Tu, Jing Bai, Wen-Jing Sim, Ioannis K. Zervantonakis, Jean Paul Thiery and Roger D. Kamm  
Integr. Biol., 2013, 5, 381-389 
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20209C 

DNA assembly for synthetic biology: from parts to pathways and beyond 
Tom Ellis, Tom Adie and Geoff S. Baldwin  
Integr. Biol., 2011, 3, 109-118 
DOI: 10.1039/C0IB00070A 

Stimulus-responsive nanopreparations for tumor targeting 
Lin Zhu and Vladimir P. Torchilin  
Integr. Biol., 2013, 5, 96-107 
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20135F  

Responsive culture platform to examine the influence of microenvironmental geometry on cell function in 3D 
April M. Kloxin, Katherine J. R. Lewis, Cole A. DeForest, Gregory Seedorf, Mark W. Tibbitt, Vivek Balasubramaniam and Kristi S. Anseth  
Integr. Biol., 2012, 4, 1540-1549 
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20212C  
 
Enabling screening in 3D microenvironments: probing matrix and stromal effects on the morphology and proliferation of T47D breast carcinoma cells 
Sara I. Montanez-Sauri, Kyung Eun Sung, Erwin Berthier and David J. Beebe  
Integr. Biol., 2013, 5, 631-640 
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB20225A  

In situ click chemistry: from small molecule discovery to synthetic antibodies 
Steven W. Millward, Heather D. Agnew, Bert Lai, Su Seong Lee, Jaehong Lim, Arundhati Nag, Suresh Pitram, Rosemary Rohde and James R. Heath 
Integr. Biol., 2013, 5, 87-95 
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20110K  

Toward personalized cancer nanomedicine – past, present, and future 
Alexander H. Stegh 
Integr. Biol., 2013, 5, 48-65 
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20104F  
 
Clinically-translated silica nanoparticles as dual-modality cancer-targeted probes for image-guided surgery and interventions 
Michelle S. Bradbury, Evan Phillips, Pablo H. Montero, Sarah M. Cheal, Hilda Stambuk, Jeremy C. Durack, Constantinos T. Sofocleous, Richard J. C. Meester, Ulrich Wiesner and Snehal Patel 
Integr. Biol., 2013, 5, 74-86 
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20174G  

Mechanobiology: a new frontier for human pluripotent stem cells 
Yubing Sun and Jianping Fu  
Integr. Biol., 2013, 5, 450-457 
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20256E  

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Integrative Biology? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us your suggestions.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Top ten most accessed articles in August

The following articles were the top ten most accessed in Integrative Biology for August:

Nanopatterned cardiac cell patches promote stem cell niche formation and myocardial regeneration
Deok-Ho Kim, Kshitiz, Rachel R. Smith, Pilnam Kim, Eun Hyun Ahn, Hong-Nam Kim, Eduardo Marbán, Kahp-Yang Suh and Andre Levchenko
Integr. Biol., 2012, 4, 1019-1033
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20067H

Control of stem cell fate and function by engineering physical microenvironments
Kshitiz, JinSeok Park, Peter Kim, Wilda Helen, Adam J. Engler, Andre Levchenko and Deok-Ho Kim
Integr. Biol., 2012, 4, 1008-1018
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20080E

Biological applications of microfluidic gradient devices
Sudong Kim, Hyung Joon Kim and Noo Li Jeon
Integr. Biol., 2010, 2, 584-603
DOI: 10.1039/C0IB00055H

Common pitfalls in nanotechnology: lessons learned from NCI’s Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory
Rachael M. Crist, Jennifer Hall Grossman, Anil K. Patri, Stephan T. Stern, Marina A. Dobrovolskaia, Pavan P. Adiseshaiah, Jeffrey D. Clogston and Scott E. McNeil
Integr. Biol., 2012, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20117H

Cancer develops, progresses and responds to therapies through restricted perturbation of the protein–protein interaction network
Jordi Serra-Musach, Helena Aguilar, Francesco Iorio, Francesc Comellas, Antoni Berenguer, Joan Brunet, Julio Saez-Rodriguez and Miguel Angel Pujana
Integr. Biol., 2012, 4, 1038-1048
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20052J

The evolution of chemotaxis assays from static models to physiologically relevant platforms
Stephanie Toetsch, Peter Olwell, Adriele Prina-Mello and Yuri Volkov
Integr. Biol., 2009, 1, 170-181
DOI: 10.1039/B814567A

DNA assembly for synthetic biology: from parts to pathways and beyond
Tom Ellis, Tom Adie and Geoff S. Baldwin
Integr. Biol., 2011, 3, 109-118
DOI: 10.1039/C0IB00070A

Soft microenvironments promote the early neurogenic differentiation but not self-renewal of human pluripotent stem cells
Albert J. Keung, Prashanth Asuri, Sanjay Kumar and David V. Schaffer
Integr. Biol., 2012, 4, 1049-1058
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20083J

Toward personalized cancer nanomedicine – past, present, and future
Alexander H. Stegh
Integr. Biol., 2012, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20104F

Microfluidic sample preparation: cell lysis and nucleic acid purification
Jungkyu Kim, Michael Johnson, Parker Hill and Bruce K. Gale
Integr. Biol., 2009, 1, 574-586
DOI: 10.1039/B905844C

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Integrative Biology? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us your suggestions.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)