Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Webinar: The power of modern HPTLC

Join Chemistry World and Advion for a webcast on the latest developments in HPTLC technology.

WHAT: Professor Morlock from the University of Giessen, Germany, will give an overview of current HPTLC methodology, explore some examples of HPTLC-MS coupling and review other current hyphenations in HPTLC. By the end of this free webinar, you will be able to:
- Recognise the power of modern HPTLC
- Learn about current hyphenations in HPTLC
- Understand the principle of elution-based HPTLC-MS
- Recognise how HPTLC hyphenations efficiently support analyses

WHEN: Wednesday, 20 March 2013 – 15:00 GMT

HOW: Click here to register (free)

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Challenges in Chemical Biology (ISACS11) – Oral Abstract Deadline 15 March 2013

This is your last chance to submit an oral abstract for Challenges in Chemical Biology (ISACS11) which will be held on 23-26 July in Boston, USA.

Act before the deadline of Friday 15 March 2013 to take advantage of this exceptional opportunity to showcase your work alongside researchers from across the globe.

For details of speakers and conferences themes, please visit the dedicated website.

The conference will bring together exceptional researchers – all leading names in their field – for an outstanding plenary programme, complemented by contributed talks, together with extensive poster sessions that will provide many opportunities to discuss the latest applications of chemical tools and techniques for probing biological problems.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Top ten most accessed articles in August

The following articles were the top ten most accessed in Integrative Biology for August:

Nanopatterned cardiac cell patches promote stem cell niche formation and myocardial regeneration
Deok-Ho Kim, Kshitiz, Rachel R. Smith, Pilnam Kim, Eun Hyun Ahn, Hong-Nam Kim, Eduardo Marbán, Kahp-Yang Suh and Andre Levchenko
Integr. Biol., 2012, 4, 1019-1033
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20067H

Control of stem cell fate and function by engineering physical microenvironments
Kshitiz, JinSeok Park, Peter Kim, Wilda Helen, Adam J. Engler, Andre Levchenko and Deok-Ho Kim
Integr. Biol., 2012, 4, 1008-1018
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20080E

Biological applications of microfluidic gradient devices
Sudong Kim, Hyung Joon Kim and Noo Li Jeon
Integr. Biol., 2010, 2, 584-603
DOI: 10.1039/C0IB00055H

Common pitfalls in nanotechnology: lessons learned from NCI’s Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory
Rachael M. Crist, Jennifer Hall Grossman, Anil K. Patri, Stephan T. Stern, Marina A. Dobrovolskaia, Pavan P. Adiseshaiah, Jeffrey D. Clogston and Scott E. McNeil
Integr. Biol., 2012, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20117H

Cancer develops, progresses and responds to therapies through restricted perturbation of the protein–protein interaction network
Jordi Serra-Musach, Helena Aguilar, Francesco Iorio, Francesc Comellas, Antoni Berenguer, Joan Brunet, Julio Saez-Rodriguez and Miguel Angel Pujana
Integr. Biol., 2012, 4, 1038-1048
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20052J

The evolution of chemotaxis assays from static models to physiologically relevant platforms
Stephanie Toetsch, Peter Olwell, Adriele Prina-Mello and Yuri Volkov
Integr. Biol., 2009, 1, 170-181
DOI: 10.1039/B814567A

DNA assembly for synthetic biology: from parts to pathways and beyond
Tom Ellis, Tom Adie and Geoff S. Baldwin
Integr. Biol., 2011, 3, 109-118
DOI: 10.1039/C0IB00070A

Soft microenvironments promote the early neurogenic differentiation but not self-renewal of human pluripotent stem cells
Albert J. Keung, Prashanth Asuri, Sanjay Kumar and David V. Schaffer
Integr. Biol., 2012, 4, 1049-1058
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20083J

Toward personalized cancer nanomedicine – past, present, and future
Alexander H. Stegh
Integr. Biol., 2012, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20104F

Microfluidic sample preparation: cell lysis and nucleic acid purification
Jungkyu Kim, Michael Johnson, Parker Hill and Bruce K. Gale
Integr. Biol., 2009, 1, 574-586
DOI: 10.1039/B905844C

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Integrative Biology? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us your suggestions.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Point of Care Diagnostics Workshop – 4 Dec 2012, London UK

Point-of-Care Diagnostics Workshop
4 December 2012, Burlington House, London, UK

Point-of-care diagnostic (POC) test devices provide rapid results on an ever expanding range of medical tests, helping to streamline healthcare and improve clinical outcomes. Research on microfluidics for POC applications has increased markedly in recent years, fuelled by an interest in constructing field-deployable analytical instruments. The interest in POC microfluidic-based devices has been intense and has cut across all major disciplines in lab-on-a-chip research, including engineering (biomedical, chemical, electrical, and mechanical), chemistry, and physics.  For further details please visit the website.

Abstract submission deadline: 31 October 2012. Abstract submission is now available online.

Application deadline: 31 October 2012. Application is now available online.

Workshop format
The aims of this Joint Biochemical Society/Royal Society of Chemistry workshop are to provide participants with a better understanding of the challenges involved in translating research outputs into application and to help encourage collaborations with industry and clinicians on POC. The workshop will bring together researchers who work at the interface between biology, chemistry and the wider life and medical sciences. Participants will be encouraged to participate in oral presentations, as well as in discussion groups intended to help move this area forward.

Speakers
Dr Ana Alfirevic, University of Liverpool, UK
Professor Andrew de Mello, ETH Zürich, Switzerland

Attendance is by application only and will be FREE of charge for Biochemical Society and Royal Society of Chemistry members.

This workshop is the fourth of a series entitled “Analytical Tools for the Life Sciences”, a collaborative project between the Biochemical Society and Royal Society of Chemistry members.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Want to know more about Organs-on-chips? Read our free articles!

As the meeting at the Lorentz Center entitled ‘Organs on Chips: Human Disease Models‘ draws to a close, we thought we’d remind you about the fantastic free* collection of articles we’ve put together from Lab on a Chip and Integrative Biology on the topic.

The collection can be found here, and includes papers such as:

Microengineered physiological biomimicry: Organs-on-Chips
Dongeun Huh, Yu-suke Torisawa, Geraldine A. Hamilton, Hyun Jung Kim and Donald E. Ingber
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40089H

Organs-on-chips: breaking the in vitro impasse
Andries D. van der Meer and Albert van den Berg
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB00176D

Ensembles of engineered cardiac tissues for physiological and pharmacological study: Heart on a chip
Anna Grosberg, Patrick W. Alford, Megan L. McCain and Kevin Kit Parker
DOI: 10.1039/C1LC20557A

Hurry though, as the collection is only available with free* access till the 8th October!

*Free access is provided to recognised institutions or to individuals through an RSC Publishing Personal Account. Registration is quick and easy at http://pubs.rsc.org/en/account/register.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Top ten most accessed articles in July 2012

This month sees the following articles in Integrative Biology that are in the top ten most accessed:

Single-cell level co-culture platform for intercellular communication
Soongweon Hong, Qiong Pan and Luke P. Lee
Integr. Biol., 2012, 4, 374-380
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB00166G  

Biological applications of microfluidic gradient devices
Sudong Kim, Hyung Joon Kim and Noo Li Jeon
Integr. Biol., 2010, 2, 584-603
DOI: 10.1039/C0IB00055H  

Bio-inspired materials for parsing matrix physicochemical control of cell migration: A Review
Hyung-Do Kim and Shelly R. Peyton
Integr. Biol., 2012, 4, 37-52
DOI: 10.1039/C1IB00069A  

Microfluidic sample preparation: cell lysis and nucleic acid purification
Jungkyu Kim, Michael Johnson, Parker Hill and Bruce K. Gale
Integr. Biol., 2009, 1, 574-586
DOI: 10.1039/B905844C 

Functional characterization and axonal transport of quantum dot labeled BDNF
Wenjun Xie, Kai Zhang and Bianxiao Cui
Integr. Biol., 2012, 4, 953-960
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20062G  

Nanomedicine boosts neurogenesis: new strategies for brain repair
Tiago Santos, João Maia, Fabienne Agasse, Sara Xapelli, Lino Ferreira and Liliana Bernardino
Integr. Biol., 2012, 4, 973-981
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20129A 

DNA assembly for synthetic biology: from parts to pathways and beyond
Tom Ellis, Tom Adie and Geoff S. Baldwin
Integr. Biol., 2011, 3, 109-118
DOI: 10.1039/C0IB00070A  

Control of stem cell fate and function by engineering physical microenvironments
Kshitiz, JinSeok Park, Peter Kim, Wilda Helen, Adam J. Engler, Andre Levchenko and Deok-Ho Kim
Integr. Biol., 2012, 4, 1008-1018
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20080E  

Microfluidics for bacterial chemotaxis
Tanvir Ahmed, Thomas S. Shimizu and Roman Stocker
Integr. Biol., 2010, 2, 604-629
DOI: 10.1039/C0IB00049C  

Fluid flow stress induced contraction and re-spread of mesenchymal stem cells: a microfluidic study
Wenfu Zheng, Yunyan Xie, Wei Zhang, Dong Wang, Wanshun Ma, Zhuo Wang and Xingyu Jiang
Integr. Biol., 2012, 4, 1102-1111
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20094E  

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Integrative Biology? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us your suggestions.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Mimicking heart tissue and understanding the spatial development of neurons on the cover of Issue 9

In this month’s issue we have a bumper crop of review articles on topics as varied as nanomedicine for brain repair, giant vesicles as cell models, the effects of curcumin and analogues on breast cancer and altering stem cell behaviour through engineering their microenvironments.

Integrative Biology coverWe also have several HOT articles in the issue, including the outside front cover article by Andre Levchenko and colleagues.  They have used autologous cardiosphere-derived cells and a nanopatterned hydrogel to overcome some of the difficulties associated with stem cell-based methods for heart tissue repair.  Their matrix was found to closely mimic the ECM and  ‘dramatically enhanced’ cardiomyogenesis.

Nanopatterned cardiac cell patches promote stem cell niche formation and myocardial regeneration
Deok-Ho Kim, Kshitiz, Rachel R. Smith, Pilnam Kim, Eun Hyun Ahn, Hong-Nam Kim, Eduardo Marbán, Kahp-Yang Suh and Andre Levchenko
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20067H

Integrative Biology cover artworkThe inside front cover features work from Joshua Maurer et al who have used self-assembled monolayers to explore whether environment or predetermined factors control axonal development.  They show that a critical factor is environmental – rather than a preprogrammed molecular event – which is the length that a developing neurite is allowed to grow to.

Spatial confinement instigates environmental determination of neuronal polarity
Dawn M. Johnson,  Jad P. Abi-Mansour and Joshua A. Maurer
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20126G

Don’t forget, our cover articles are free to access for 6 weeks – just sign in with your RSC Publishing Personal account.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Issue 8 online now!

This month’s outside front cover features work from Jonathan Rocheleau and co-workers at the University of Toronto.

In their article, they introduce a novel method for flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging, to measure the dynamics of fatty acid oxidation linked to pancreatic islet metabolism. They were able to record real-time measurements from islets held stationary in flow using microfluidic devices.

Quantitative imaging of electron transfer flavoprotein autofluorescence reveals the dynamics of lipid partitioning in living pancreatic islets
Alan K. Lam, Pamuditha N. Silva, Svetlana M. Altamentova and Jonathan V. Rocheleau
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20075A


Work from Konstantinos Konstantopoulos, Kathleen Stebe and colleagues from The Johns Hopkins University and the University of Pennsylvania, was the inspiration for the inside front cover this month.

The article focuses on receptor-mediated cell adhesion in shear flow, and uses an integrated experimental and mathematical approach to gain understanding of the process. Using a microfluidic device combined with a glass slide with P- or L-selectin immobilised onto specific sections, the critical patch length needed by HL-60 leukemic cells to start tethering under flow was investigated. The authors found that the length is prescribed by the minimum number of receptor–ligand bonds needed to start cell tethering and the tensile strength of the bonds.

Selectin-mediated adhesion in shear flow using micropatterned substrates: multiple-bond interactions govern the critical length for cell binding
ZiQiu Tong, Luthur Siu-Lun Cheung, Kathleen J. Stebe and Konstantinos Konstantopoulos
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20036H


Lance Munn and collaborators at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School’s article features on the back cover of issue 8.

Their paper focuses on vascular anastomosis, and uses a microfluidic device to reproduce the process in vitro. Using a collagenous matrix, the vessels are able to sprout and grow together, forming perfused bridging connections. The authors feel that the device will ‘enable a new generation of studies of the mechanisms of angiogenesis and provide a novel and practical platform for drug screening’.

Anastomosis of endothelial sprouts forms new vessels in a tissue analogue of angiogenesis
Jonathan W. Song, Despina Bazou and Lance L. Munn
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20061A

Also included in the issue is a review on the role of regucalcin in brain calcium signalling and papers focussing on a method to calculate the change of network metabolites for different time points of transcriptomic datasets and the differential effects of a soluble or immobilized VEGFR-binding peptide.

Read the rest of the issue online here.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Integrative Biology’s top cited papers from 2009 and 2010

To celebrate last month’s release of the 2011 Impact Factors, we are making some of our best content free to access.

The collection brings together the 20 top cited Integrative Biology papers from 2009 and 2010.

View the collection here.

All the articles are free to access for a limited time, following a simple registration for individual users.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Lipids and Membrane Biophysics: Faraday Discussion 161

There’s still just time to submit a poster for Lipids and Membrane Biophysics: Faraday Discussion 161 – by the deadline date 13 July.

This Faraday Discussion will consider recent developments in the study of biomembrane structure, ordering and dynamics, with particular emphasis on the roles of lipids in these phenomena. Registration is quick and simple via our online booking system, so act today and benefit from early bird savings.

Why choose to come to a Faraday Discussion? They have a unique format – all papers are circulated in advance and all discussion contributions are recorded for publication in the abstract book after the event. You can also have your own poster space at the meeting, so submit yours now before the deadline of 13 July.

Come and discuss new experimental and theoretical findings and novel methodologies, as we focus on exploring the relevance of concepts from amphiphile self-assembly and soft matter physics to understanding biomembranes.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)