Archive for the ‘News’ Category

What are your colleagues reading in Integrative Biology?

The articles below are some of the most read Integrative Biology articles in 2017 so far. You can view the full collection of our top 10 downloaded articles here. These articles will be free to access* for the next four weeks with a free publishing personal account – register here.

A selection of these articles is shown below:

Review articles

Liquid biopsy on chip: a paradigm shift towards the understanding of cancer metastasis
Amogha Tadimety, Abeer Syed, Yuan Nie, Christina R. Long, Kasia M. Kready and John X. J. Zhang

New advances in probing cell–extracellular matrix interactions
Allen P. Liu, Ovijit Chaudhuri and Sapun H. Parekh

Papers

PEG–peptide hydrogels reveal differential effects of matrix microenvironmental cues on melanoma drug sensitivity
Emi Y. Tokuda, Caitlin E. Jones and Kristi S. Anseth

Integrating perfusable vascular networks with a three-dimensional tissue in a microfluidic device
Yuji Nashimoto, Tomoya Hayashi, Itsuki Kunita, Akiko Nakamasu, Yu-suke Torisawa, Masamune Nakayama, Hisako Takigawa-Imamura, Hidetoshi Kotera, Koichi Nishiyama, Takashi Miura and Ryuji Yokokawa

Correlation of focal adhesion assembly and disassembly with cell migration on nanotopography
Elena I. Liang, Emma J. Mah, Albert F. Yee and Michelle A. Digman
Keep up-to-date with the latest issues of Integrative Biology by joining our e-alerts.

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Major society chemistry publishers jointly commit to integration with ORCID

ORCID provides an identifier for individuals to use with their name as they engage in research, scholarship and innovation activities, ensuring authors gain full credit for their work.

Today, we signed their open letter, along with ACS Publications, committing to unambiguous identification of all authors that publish in our journals.

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The Royal Society of Chemistry and the Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) today each became signatories to the ORCID Open Letter, reasserting the commitment of both organizations to enhancing the scholarly publishing experience for researchers worldwide who are involved in chemistry and allied fields.

The commitment by these two global chemistry publishers to undertake new workflow integration with technology infrastructure provided by ORCID, a not-for-profit organization that provides unique identifiers for researchers and scholars, will enable both societies to provide unambiguous designation of author names within chemistry and across the broader sciences. This partnership with ORCID will resolve ambiguity in researcher identification caused by name changes, cultural differences in name presentation, and the inconsistent use of name abbreviations that is too often a source of confusion for those who must rely on the published scientific record.

By becoming signatories to the ORCID Open Letter, these two major chemical societies are voicing their intent to collect ORCID iDs for all submitting authors through use of the ORCID API, and to display such identifiers in the articles published in their respective society journals. The integration of such activities within the publishers’ workflows means authors will benefit from automated linkages between their ORCID record and unique identifiers embedded within their published research articles, ensuring their contributions are appropriately recognized and credited.

During the publishing process, ACS and the Royal Society of Chemistry will automatically deposit publications to Crossref, which in turn will coordinate with ORCID to link and update the publishing activity populated to authors’ respective ORCID profiles, thus attributing each published work to the correct researcher. Existing holders of an ORCID iD will encounter a one-time prompt to grant permission for the linkage. If authors do not have an ORCID iD, they can easily enroll without navigating away from the publishers’ manuscript submission site. If users wish to revoke integrated ORCID profile access at any time, they can elect to do so through their ACS, Royal Society of Chemistry or ORCID accounts.

Both ACS Publications and the Royal Society of Chemistry understand the importance of attributing accurately the scholarly contributions of research scientists in the context of their other professional activities. “ACS has supported ORCID since the outset of the initiative,” says Sarah Tegen, Ph.D., Vice President of Global Editorial & Author Services at ACS Publications. “We are pleased now to align with the Royal Society of Chemistry in this endeavor, as both societies underscore our willingness not only to encourage and assist our respective authors in establishing their unique ORCID profiles, but also to help tackle the broader challenge of researcher name disambiguation in the scholarly literature. With the integration of author ORCID iDs in our publishing workflows, we will ensure that researchers receive proper credit for their accomplishments.”

Emma Wilson, Ph.D., Director of Publishing at the Royal Society of Chemistry adds, “We have been a supporter of ORCID since 2013, recognizing the benefits it brings to researchers; ORCID can and will make a huge difference to our authors’ ability to gain full credit for their work. ORCID will also help researchers meet the requirements of their research funders — for example, a number of funders have already announced that all grant applicants must now include a researcher’s ORCID iD. A unified system that integrates and links research-related information with accurate and timely linkage to the publishing output of authors has the potential to simplify and speed up their grant applications — something we know is important to researchers.”

“The ACS and the Royal Society of Chemistry have been long-standing supporters of ORCID,” says Laurel Haak, Ph.D., Executive Director, ORCID. “We are pleased to see ORCID integration into ACS and Royal Society of Chemistry Publications systems. This will be a substantial benefit to researchers in the chemistry community, both in improving search and discovery of research articles, and for attribution and recognition of researchers’ contributions to the discipline.”

About the American Chemical Society and ACS Publications

The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With nearly 157,000 members, ACS is the world’s largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

ACS Publications, a division of the American Chemical Society, is a nonprofit scholarly publisher of 50 peer-reviewed journals and a range of eBooks at the interface of chemistry and allied sciences, including physics and biology. ACS Publications journals are among the most-cited, most-trusted and most-read within the scientific literature. Respected for their editorial rigor, ACS journals offer high-quality service to authors and readers, including rapid time to publication, a range of channels for researchers to access ACS Publications’ award-winning web and mobile delivery platforms, and a comprehensive program of open access publishing options for authors and their funders. ACS Publications also publishes Chemical & Engineering News — the Society’s newsmagazine covering science and technology, business and industry, government and policy, education and employment aspects of the chemistry field.

About the Royal Society of Chemistry

The Royal Society of Chemistry is the world’s leading chemistry community, advancing excellence in the chemical sciences. With over 50,000 members and a knowledge business that spans the globe, we are the U.K.’s professional body for chemical scientists; a not-for-profit organisation with 175 years of history and an international vision for the future. We promote, support and celebrate chemistry. We work to shape the future of the chemical sciences — for the benefit of science and humanity.

About ORCID

ORCID’s vision is a world where all who participate in research, scholarship and innovation are uniquely identified and connected to their contributions across disciplines, borders and time. ORCID provides an identifier for individuals to use with their name as they engage in research, scholarship and innovation activities. It provides open tools that enable transparent and trustworthy connections between researchers, their contributions and affiliations. The organization provides this service to help people find information and to simplify reporting and analysis. ORCID is a not-for-profit organization, sustained by fees from member organizations. Its work is open, transparent and non-proprietary. The organization strives to be a trusted component of research infrastructure with the goal of providing clarity in the breadth of research contributions and the people who make them.

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Regulating with RNA in Bacteria and Archaea Conference

Many congratulations to Bridget Watson, Maya Shamir and Adrien Chauvier on their poster prize success at the Regulating with RNA in Bacteria and Archaea Conference, which took place from 5th-8th December 2015 in Cancun, Mexico.

This conference was the fourth in a series of extremely successful meetings exploring the latest findings regarding this important class of regulators.

The event was a premier forum for the presentation of cutting-edge advances and the latest perspectives in the areas of discovery, mechanism, structure and evolution of bacterial riboregulators. Sessions covered prominent and emerging roles of small RNAs in regulatory networks as well as their diverse mechanisms of action.

Integrative Biology was the proud sponsor of the poster prizes at this conference. The recipients received a books voucher and a Royal Society of Chemistry certificate.

The winner and runners-up were:

Winner: Bridget Watson (University of Otago, New Zealand)
Runners-up: Maya Shamir (Weizmann Institute, Isreal) & Adrien Chauvier (Université de Sherbrooke, Canada)

The picture shows Professor Gerhart Wagner (Uppsala University) handing the certificates and vouchers to the winners

The judges of the prizes thought the quality of the presentations and posters were really high and, from the Integrative Biology team, we would like to thank everyone that attended or presented at the meeting.

For more details on this event, please visit the conference website.

Many congratulations on this achievement from the Integrative Biology team

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January’s HOT Article

Article of the month for January, recommended by our referees, is free* to access for a limited time only!

Graphical Abstract

Magnetic engineering of stable rod-shaped stem cell aggregates: circumventing the pitfall of self-bending
V. Du, D. Fayol, M. Reffay, N. Luciani, J-C. Bacri, C. Gay and C. Wilhelm
Integr. Biol., 2015,7, 170-177
DOI: 10.1039/C4IB00219A

Take a look at our Integrative Biology 2015 HOT Articles Collection!

 

*Access is free through a publishing personal account. It’s quick, easy and free to register!

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December’s HOT Article

Article of the month for December, recommended by our referees, is free* to access for a limited time only!

 Graphical Abstract

 A biologically inspired lung-on-a-chip device for the study of protein-induced lung inflammation
Tushar H. Punde,  Wen-Hao Wu, Pei-Chun Lien,  Ya-Ling Chang, Ping-Hsueh Kuo,  Margaret Dah-Tsyr Chang, Kang-Yun Lee, Chien-Da Huang, Han-Pin Kuo, Yao-Fei Chan, Po-Chen Shih and  Cheng-Hsien Liu
Integr. Biol., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4IB00239C 

Take a look at our Integrative Biology 2014 HOT Articles Collection!

 

*Access is free through a publishing personal account. It’s quick, easy and free to register!

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Integrative Biology’s Top 2013 Cited Papers

Click on the links to access the full papers – free* downloads until the 30th September 2014!

DNA assembly for synthetic biology: from parts to pathways and beyond
Tom Ellis, Tom Adie and Geoff S. Baldwin
Integr. Biol., 2011,3, 109-118
DOI: 10.1039/C0IB00070A, Frontier

High-throughput combinatorial cell co-culture using microfluidics
Ethan Tumarkin, Lsan Tzadu, Elizabeth Csaszar, Minseok Seo, Hong Zhang, Anna Lee, Raheem Peerani, Kelly Purpura, Peter W. Zandstra and Eugenia Kumacheva
Integr. Biol., 2011,3, 653-662
DOI: 10.1039/C1IB00002K, Paper

Organs-on-chips: breaking the in vitro impasse
Andries D. van der Meer and Albert van den Berg
Integr. Biol., 2012,4, 461-470
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB00176D, Critical Review

Biophysical regulation of tumor cell invasion: moving beyond matrix stiffness
Amit Pathak and Sanjay Kumar
Integr. Biol., 2011,3, 267-278
DOI: 10.1039/C0IB00095G, Critical Review

Transition to invasion in breast cancer: a microfluidic in vitro model enables examination of spatial and temporal effects
Kyung Eun Sung, Ning Yang, Carolyn Pehlke, Patricia J. Keely, Kevin W. Eliceiri, Andreas Friedl and David J. Beebe
Integr. Biol., 2011,3, 439-450
DOI: 10.1039/C0IB00063A, Paper

Apoptotic cell signaling in cancer progression and therapy
Jessica Plati, Octavian Bucur and Roya Khosravi-Far
Integr. Biol., 2011,3, 279-296
DOI: 10.1039/C0IB00144A, Review Article

Intracellular mapping with SERS-encoded gold nanostars
Laura Rodríguez-Lorenzo, Zeljka Krpetic, Silvia Barbosa, Ramón A. Alvarez-Puebla, Luis M. Liz-Marzán, Ian A. Prior and Mathias Brust
Integr. Biol., 2011,3, 922-926
DOI: 10.1039/C1IB00029B, Paper

Hyaluronic acid matrices show matrix stiffness in 2D and 3D dictates cytoskeletal order and myosin-II phosphorylation within stem cells
Florian Rehfeldt, André E. X. Brown, Matthew Raab, Shenshen Cai, Allison L. Zajac, Assaf Zemel and Dennis E. Discher
Integr. Biol., 2012,4, 422-430
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB00150K, Paper

(Micro)managing the mechanical microenvironment
Christopher Moraes, Yu Sun and Craig A. Simmons
Integr. Biol., 2011,3, 959-971
DOI: 10.1039/C1IB00056J, Critical Review

A perspective on vascular disrupting agents that interact with tubulin: preclinical tumor imaging and biological assessment
Ralph P. Mason, Dawen Zhao, Li Liu, Mary Lynn Trawick and Kevin G. Pinney
Integr. Biol., 2011,3, 375-387
DOI: 10.1039/C0IB00135J, Perspective

*Access is free through a registered RSC account – click here to register

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Seasons Greetings from Integrative Biology!

The holidays are nearly here!!

We know everyone’s been working hard to finish off semesters and write up those papers. Here in Cambridge we’ve been working hard too, planning for the New Year and wrapping up 2013. To spread the holiday cheer, we’ve chosen three highly accessed papers and made them *FREE TO ACCESS* for the next four weeks. Enjoy!

Merry Christmas from the IB team!



Paper: Mechanisms of tumour cell extravasation in an in vitro microvascular network platform, by Roger D. Kamm, MIT

Critical Review: Directed cell migration in multi-cue environments, by Laura Lara Rodriguez, Iowa State

Paper: Changes in translational efficiency is a dominant regulatory mechanism in the environmental response of bacteria, by H. Steve Wiley, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory




Access is free through a registered RSC account – click here to register

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Lessons for Young Scientists…

Around 4 years ago, Integrative Biology board member and Nobel laureate Professor Roger Tsien visited the Department of Biochemistry at Oxford University. During his talk one insightful scientist wrote down a few of Professor Tsien’s words of wisdom. Here’s what he had to say on building an effective and successful science research career…

Try to put your neuroses to constructive use.

Try to find projects that give you some sensual pleasure.

Accept that your batting average will be low but hopefully not zero.

Accept that your best papers may be rejected from the fashionable journals or may be accepted for the wrong reasons (the same for grant proposals).

Learn to make lemonade from lemons; sometimes persistence pays off.

Prizes are ultimately a matter of luck, so avoid being motivated or impressed by them.

Find the right collaborators and exploit them kindly for mutual benefit.

 

Professor Tsien’s advice for young scientists has been posted here on behalf of both Roger and the insightful scientist, who we thank heartily for taking such excellent notes!

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Free to access HOT articles!

These HOT articles were recommended by our referees and are free to access for 4 weeks*

Microfluidic interrogation and mathematical modeling of multi-regime calcium signaling dynamics
Andreja Jovic, Susan M. Wade, Richard R. Neubig, Jennifer J. Linderman and Shuichi Takayama  
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40032H

GA

Molecular mechanisms of biomaterial-driven osteogenic differentiation in human mesenchymal stromal cells
Ana M. C. Barradas, Veronica Monticone, Marc Hulsman, Charlène Danoux, Hugo Fernandes, Zeinab Tahmasebi Birgani, Florence Barrère-de Groot, Huipin Yuan, Marcel Reinders, Pamela Habibovic, Clemens van Blitterswijk and Jan de Boer
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40027A

GA

Cells, tissues, and organs on chips: challenges and opportunities for the cancer tumor microenvironment
Edmond W. K. Young  
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40076J

GA

Microfluidic technique to measure intratumoral transport and calculate drug efficacy shows that binding is essential for doxorubicin and release hampers Doxil
Bhushan J. Toley, Zachary G. Tropeano Lovatt, Josephine L. Harrington and Neil S. Forbes
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40021B

GA

Integrated experimental and computational approach to understand the effects of heavy ion radiation on skin homeostasis
Claere von Neubeck, Harish Shankaran, Matthew J. Geniza, Paula M. Kauer, R. Joe Robinson, William B. Chrisler and Marianne B. Sowa  
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40071A

GA

Transfection in the third dimension
Anandika Dhaliwal, Victor Oshita and Tatiana Segura 
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40086G

GA

Change of laminin density stimulates axon branching via growth cone myosin II-mediated adhesion
Wenwen Liu, Shige Xing, Bo Yuan, Wenfu Zheng and Xingyu Jiang  
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40131F

GA

Chemical principles for the design of a novel fluorescent probe with high cancer-targeting selectivity and sensitivity
Chi-Chih Kang, Wei-Chun Huang, Chiung-Wen Kouh, Zi-Fu Wang, Chih-Chien Cho, Cheng-Chung Chang, Chiung-Lin Wang, Ta-Chau Chang, Joachim Seemann and Lily Jun-shen Huang 
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40058A

GA

A label-free optical biosensor with microfluidics identifies an intracellular signalling wave mediated through the β2-adrenergic receptor
Ann M. Ferrie, Chaoming Wang, Huayun Deng and Ye Fang  
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40112J

GA

Mechanisms of tumor cell extravasation in an in vitro microvascular network platform
Michelle B. Chen, Jordan A. Whisler, Jessie S. Jeon and Roger D. Kamm  
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40149A

GA

*Free access to individuals is provided through an RSC Publishing personal account. It’s quick, simple and more importantly – free – to register!

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Free to access Cancer Nanotechnology collection 2013

We are pleased to present a web collection of articles from publications across the RSC journal portfolio demonstrating the use of (nano)technology in the diagnosis, imaging and treatment of cancer.

This web collection will be free to access from today until the 28th July, so register for an RSC Publishing personal account and read this cutting edge research for free this week!

Here are just a few of the cancer nanotechnology articles from Integrative Biology:

Clinically-translated silica nanoparticles as dual-modality cancer-targeted probes for image-guided surgery and interventions
Michelle S. Bradbury, Evan Phillips, Pablo H. Montero, Sarah M. Cheal, Hilda Stambuk, Jeremy C. Durack, Constantinos T. Sofocleous, Richard J. C. Meester, Ulrich Wiesner and Snehal Patel 
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20174G

Toward personalized cancer nanomedicine – past, present, and future
Alexander H. Stegh  
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20104F

Biological characterizations of [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles as fullerene derivatives for cancer therapy
Jie Meng, Xingjie Liang, Xiaoyuan Chen and Yuliang Zhao
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20145C

Targeted nanoparticles in imaging: paving the way for personalized medicine in the battle against cancer
Soo J. Shin, Jaymes R. Beech and Kimberly A. Kelly     
DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20047C

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