Archive for the ‘Hot Articles’ Category

December’s HOT Article

Article of the month for December, recommended by our referees, is free* to access for a limited time only!

 Graphical Abstract

 A biologically inspired lung-on-a-chip device for the study of protein-induced lung inflammation
Tushar H. Punde,  Wen-Hao Wu, Pei-Chun Lien,  Ya-Ling Chang, Ping-Hsueh Kuo,  Margaret Dah-Tsyr Chang, Kang-Yun Lee, Chien-Da Huang, Han-Pin Kuo, Yao-Fei Chan, Po-Chen Shih and  Cheng-Hsien Liu
Integr. Biol., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4IB00239C 

Take a look at our Integrative Biology 2014 HOT Articles Collection!

 

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November’s HOT Article

Article of the month for November, recommended by our referees, is free* to access for a limited time only!


Silk fibroin-keratin based 3D scaffolds as a dermal substitute for skin tissue engineering
Nandana Bhardwaj, Wan Ting Sow, Dipali Devi, Kee Woei Ng, Biman B. Mandal and Nam-Joon Cho
Integr. Biol., 2015,7, 53-63
DOI: 10.1039/C4IB00208C, Paper


Take a look at our Integrative Biology 2014 HOT Articles Collection!


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Axon conduction slows in response to spontaneous bursts of neural activity

Neurons are typically though of as all-or-nothing communicators: an action potential—an electrical impulse that triggers the release of chemical neurotransmitters—either fires or doesn’t. However, recent evidence suggests that neurons can change their conduction properties to send gradated signals.

A study published last month in the Royal Society of Chemistry’s journal Integrative Biology is the latest in a spate of papers exploring this phenomenon. Here, a group of Japanese researchers investigated whether axon conduction velocity changed in response to spontaneous neuronal bursting. Bursting is a high frequency but relatively short-lived firing pattern, thought to aid in neural maturation and plasticity. Previous research has shown that repeated neural firing causes membrane hyperpolarization, triggering a decrease in conduction velocity. But because an action potential alters the axonal membrane potential and thus the axon’s conductivity, the finding that spontaneous high-frequency activity (as opposed to that induced by electrical stimulation) produces a similar effect suggests that that conduction slowing may be a more general phenomenon.


Overcoming limitations of previous studies only able to record from stimulated neurons, the researchers designed a sensitive microfabricated device to measure spontaneous firing in individual axons. The device separates cultured neurons into two populations that can communicate only through microtunnels, tiny channels just large enough for axons to grow through but small enough to keep the cell bodies out. Signaling activity along the axon is measured through microelectrodes lining the microtunnels. Once the researchers sorted the recorded spikes—signals of neural firing—by the axon from which they originated, they confirmed that spontaneous bursting activity lead to delays in axon conduction, particularly in more mature neurons. That is, even without a jolt of electrical stimulation, axons can adjust their conductivity based on activity level and environmental conditions.

The full article is free* to access until 30th January 2015 – download now by clicking the link below:

Axonal conduction slowing induced by spontaneous bursting activity in cortical neurons cultured in a microtunnel device

Kenta Shimba, Koji Sakai, Takuya Isomura, Kiyoshi Kotani and Yasuhiko Jimbo
DOI: 10.1039/C4IB00223G

About the webwriter

Laurel Hamers is a recent graduate of Williams College and an aspiring science journalist. She has written for the Marine Biological Laboratory, Inside Science News Service, and the Materials Research Society. You can find her on her blog (sciencescope.wordpress.com) or on Twitter (@arboreal_laurel.)

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October’s HOT Article!

Article of the month for October, recommended by our referees, is free* to access for a limited time only!


Take a look at our Integrative Biology 2014 HOT Articles Collection!


*Access is free until 05.01.14 through a publishing personal account. It’s quick, easy and free to register!

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September’s HOT Article!

Article of the month for September, recommended by our referees, is free* to access for a limited time only!


An improved interolog mapping-based computational prediction of protein–protein interactions with increased network coverage
Edson Luiz Folador, Syed Shah Hassan, Ney Lemke, Debmalya Barh, Artur Silva, Rafaela Salgado Ferreira and Vasco Azevedo
Integr. Biol., 2014,6, 1080-1087
DOI: 10.1039/C4IB00136B

From themed collection Computational Integrative biology (IB)


Take a look at our Integrative Biology 2014 HOT Articles Collection!


*Access is free until 28.11.14 through a publishing personal account. It’s quick, easy and free to register!

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Non-linear EGFR pathway has linear response to ligand (say that five times fast)

The authors of the cover article for the August 2014 issue of Integrative Biology explore how extracellular signals are transmitted into the cells for the epidermal growth factor (EGF) pathway. In addition to shedding light on the complex nature of the EGFR pathway, this work provides insights that could be used to further understand mutations that cause cancerous cells to form. Signalling pathways, especially those involving growth factors, are often causes of the excessive growth and division rates of cancer cells

Cover Image, Integrative Biology August 2014

Extracellular signalling pathways are important for cell growth, division and death (apoptosis), but are difficult to study due to their transient nature and the presence of feedback loops. The epidermal growth factor (EGF) pathway also feeds into the MAPK signal cascade, so the quantitative responses of the cell to the initial signal is difficult to determine experimentally. Once the extracellular signal molecule (here EGF) binds to its receptor (EGFR), the cell acts on the signal, and then the original ligand is degraded. Further, the receptors themselves can be made and recycled during this process, adding another layer of complexity.

Figure 1A: The EGFR pathway

The researchers investigated the activation of the EGF receptor itself both experimentally and using a mathematical model (outlined in the paper). Using their mathematical model they predicted that the activation of EGFR (by phosphorylation) should be linearly related to the concentration of ligand EGF which binds to the cell. They then took serum starved cells, added varying concentrations of EGF and determined the amount of phosphorylated EGFR by high-throughput imaging of the immunofluorescence level. They determined that the activation level of the ligand was directly proportional to the ligand concentration, in agreement with the mathematical model.

Figure 4, bottom left panel: The linear relationship between receptor activation level and the amount of EGF added.

The study also showed that the activation of EGFR does not depend on the receptor turnover rate, the ligand binding affinity or the number of receptors available. The methods reported here could be used to describe other extracellular signalling pathways in future, leading to a greater understanding of these complicated and crucial systems.

Download the full article for free* until 21st October 2014!

The EGFR demonstrates linear signal transmission

Diego A. Oyarzun, Jo L. Bramhall, Fernando Lopez-Caamal, Frances M. Richards, Duncan I Jodrell, and Ben-Fillippo Krippendorff

DOI: 10.1039/c4ib00062e

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Free access to HOT articles

These HOT articles were recommended by our referees and are free to access for 4 weeks*

A biocompatible method of controlled retrieval of cell-encapsulating microgels from a culture plate
Kihak Gwon, Mihye Kim and Giyoong Tae  
Integr. Biol., 2014,6, 596-602
DOI: 10.1039/C4IB00006D

 Graphical abstract: A biocompatible method of controlled retrieval of cell-encapsulating microgels from a culture plate

The EGFR demonstrates linear signal transmission
Diego A. Oyarzún, Jo L. Bramhall, Fernando López-Caamal, Frances M. Richards, Duncan I. Jodrell and Ben-Fillippo Krippendorff  
Integr. Biol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4IB00062E

Graphical abstract: The EGFR demonstrates linear signal transmission

*Free access to individuals is provided through an RSC Publishing personal account. It’s quick, easy and more importantly – free – to register!

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Free access to HOT Articles

These HOT articles were recommended by our referees and are free to access for 4 weeks*

A biocompatible method of controlled retrieval of cell-encapsulating microgels from a culture plate
Kihak Gwon, Mihye Kim and Giyoong Tae  
Integr. Biol., 2014,6, 596-602
DOI: 10.1039/C4IB00006D

Graphical abstract: A biocompatible method of controlled retrieval of cell-encapsulating microgels from a culture plate

Sensory neurons and osteoblasts: close partners in a microfluidic platform
Estrela Neto, Cecília J. Alves, Daniela M. Sousa, Inês S. Alencastre, Ana H. Lourenço, Luís Leitão, Hyun R. Ryu, Noo L. Jeon, Rui Fernandes, Paulo Aguiar, Ramiro D. Almeida and Meriem Lamghari  
Integr. Biol., 2014,6, 586-595
DOI: 10.1039/C4IB00035H

Graphical abstract: Sensory neurons and osteoblasts: close partners in a microfluidic platform
 
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Free access to HOT articles

These HOT articles were recommended by our referees and are free to access for 4 weeks*

Rapid uptake of glucose and lactate, and not hypoxia, induces apoptosis in three-dimensional tumor tissue culture
Rachel W. Kasinskas, Raja Venkatasubramanian and Neil S. Forbes  
Integr. Biol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4IB00001C, Paper

Graphical abstract: Rapid uptake of glucose and lactate, and not hypoxia, induces apoptosis in three-dimensional tumor tissue culture

A screen for short-range paracrine interactions
K. H. Spencer, M. Y. Kim, C. C. W. Hughes and E. E. Hui  
 Integr. Biol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40211H, Paper

Graphical abstract: A screen for short-range paracrine interactions
Functional analysis of single cells identifies a rare subset of circulating tumor cells with malignant traits
Xiaosai Yao, Atish D. Choudhury, Yvonne J. Yamanaka, Viktor A. Adalsteinsson, Todd M. Gierahn, Christina A. Williamson, Carla R. Lamb, Mary-Ellen Taplin, Mari Nakabayashi, Matthew S. Chabot, Tiantian Li, Gwo-Shu M. Lee, Jesse S. Boehm, Philip W. Kantoff, William C. Hahn, K. Dane Wittrup and J. Christopher Love  
Integr. Biol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40264A, Paper 

Graphical abstract: Functional analysis of single cells identifies a rare subset of circulating tumor cells with malignant traits

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Free access to HOT articles!

These HOT articles were recommended by our referees and are free to access for 4 weeks*

The contractile strength of vascular smooth muscle myocytes is shape dependent
George J. C. Ye, Yvonne Aratyn-Schaus, Alexander P. Nesmith, Francesco S. Pasqualini, Patrick W. Alford and Kevin Kit Parker  
Integr. Biol., 2014,6, 152-163
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40230D, Paper

Retrotaxis of human neutrophils during mechanical confinement inside microfluidic channels
Bashar Hamza, Elisabeth Wong, Sachin Patel, Hansang Cho, Joseph Martel and Daniel Irimia  
Integr. Biol., 2014,6, 175-183
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40175H, Paper

Response of single leukemic cells to peptidase inhibitor therapy across time and dose using a microfluidic device
Michelle L. Kovarik, Alexandra J. Dickinson, Pourab Roy, Ranjit A. Poonnen, Jason P. Fine and Nancy L. Allbritton  
Integr. Biol., 2014,6, 164-174
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40249E, Paper

Determination of glucose flux in live myoblasts by microfluidic nanosensing and mathematical modeling
Alessandro Zambon, Alice Zoso, Camilla Luni, Wolf B. Frommer and Nicola Elvassore  
Integr. Biol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40204E, Paper

Studies of the drug resistance response of sensitive and drug-resistant strains in a microfluidic system
Xiangdan Jiang, Yu Kang, Xingjie Pan, Jun Yu, Qi Ouyang and Chunxiong Luo  
Integr. Biol., 2014,6, 143-151
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40164B, Paper

Topographical control of multiple cell adhesion molecules for traction force microscopy
Samuel R. Polio, Harikrishnan Parameswaran, Elizabeth P. Canovic, Carolynn M. Gaut, Diana Aksyonova, Dimitrije Stamenovic and Michael L. Smith  
Integr. Biol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40127H, Technical Innovation

Oscillatory shear stress induced calcium flickers in osteoblast cells
Bibhas Roy, Tamal Das, Debasish Mishra, Tapas K. Maiti and Suman Chakraborty  
Integr. Biol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40174J, Paper

The role of regucalcin in bone homeostasis: involvement as a novel cytokine
Masayoshi Yamaguchi  
Integr. Biol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40217G, Review Article

RhoA and Rac1 play independent roles in lysophosphatidic acid-induced ovarian cancer chemotaxis
Hyundoo Hwang, Eung-Kyun Kim, Juhee Park, Pann-Ghill Suh and Yoon-Kyoung Cho  
Integr. Biol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3IB40183A, Paper 

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