Author Archive

Blue screen of cell death

Low intensity blue light from smartphones and televisions kills human retinal cells

Short wavelength blue light produced by low intensity displays such as smartphones and televisions has been identified as being damaging to human eye cells by a group of Korean researchers. The scientists believe that their study could encourage development of devices that are less harmful to our eyes.

Scientists have previously discovered that blue light, especially at shorter wavelengths, can damage cells in the retina, the light-sensitive layer of tissue that lines the inside of our eyes. Blue light produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide radicals, in retinal cells. This can lead to cell death. However, previous research has focused on high intensity light, such as that from light emitting diode lamps.

As our lives are increasingly spent staring at phones, laptops and televisions, Young Pyo Jang from Kyung Hee University, Jong Soon Kang from the Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology and their team have now investigated the effect of low intensity blue light on retinal cells. They found that short wavelength blue light doubles the death rate in human retinal cells compared with cells kept in the dark.

 

Read the full article in Chemistry World.


Blue light effect on retinal pigment epithelial cells by display devices
Jiyoung Moon, Jieun Yun, Yeo Dae Yoon, Sang-Il Park, Young-Jun Seo, Won-Sang Park, Hye Yong Chu, Keun Hong Park, Myung Yeol Lee, Chang Woo Lee, Soo Jin Oh, Young-Shin Kwak, Young Pyo Jang and Jong Soon Kang

Integr. Biol., 2017, Advance Article

DOI: 10.1039/C7IB00032D

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Outstanding Reviewers for Integrative Biology in 2016

Following the success of Peer Review Week in September 2016 (dedicated to reviewer recognition) during which we published a list of our top reviewers, we are delighted to announce that we will continue to recognise the contribution that our reviewers make to the journal by announcing our Outstanding Reviewers each year.

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Integrative Biology in 2016, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Dr Nakwon Choi, Korea Institute of Science and Technology
Dr Rong Fan, Yale University
Dr  Ryuzo Kawamura, Saitama Daigaku
Dr  Kristen Mills, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Dr  Chris  Moraes, McGill University
Dr Shelly Peyton, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Professor  Paolo  Provenzano, University of Minnesota System
Dr  Takeshi  Teramura, Kinki Daigaku
Dr Joe Tien, Boston University
Dr  Scott  Verbridge, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

We would also like to thank the Integrative Biology board and the biology community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

 

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

 

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What are your colleagues reading in Integrative Biology?

The articles below are some of the most read Integrative Biology articles in 2016. You can view the full collection of our top 10 downloaded articles here.

Mimicking the topography of the epidermal–dermal interface with elastomer substrates
Priyalakshmi Viswanathan, Murat Guvendiren, Wesley Chua, Stephanie B. Telerman, Kifayathullah Liakath-Ali, Jason A. Burdick and Fiona M. Watt

 

Genetically modified bacteriophages
Antonia P. Sagona, Aurelija M. Grigonyte, Paul R. MacDonald and Alfonso Jaramillo

 

Time series modeling of live-cell shape dynamics for image-based phenotypic profiling
Simon Gordonov, Mun Kyung Hwang, Alan Wells, Frank B. Gertler, Douglas A. Lauffenburger and Mark Bathe

 

The appeasement of Doug: a synthetic approach to enhancer biology
Ben J. Vincent, Javier Estrada and Angela H. DePace

 

Mechanical phenotyping of primary human skeletal stem cells in heterogeneous populations by real-time deformability cytometry
Miguel Xavier, Philipp Rosendahl, Maik Herbig, Martin Kräter, Daniel Spencer, Martin Bornhäuser, Richard O. C. Oreffo, Hywel Morgan, Jochen Guck and Oliver Otto

 

Keep up-to-date with the latest issues of Integrative Biology by joining our e-alerts.

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Symposium Latsis EPFL 2016: Multicellular organisms in microfluidic systems

The Symposium Latsis EPFL 2016 “Multicellular organisms in microfluidic systems” was held from 14 November 2016 to 16 November 2016 at the EPFL campus in Lausanne (Switzerland). The event was co-organised by Prof. Johan Auwerx andLab on a Chip Advisory Board member Prof. Martin Gijs.

PhD student Li Dong was presented the Poster Award

Studies of living organisms like nematodes and invertebrate embryos in controlled spatio-temporal chemical environments on microfluidic chips are gaining momentum, as these animals offer genetic amenability, low-cost, and culture conditions that are compatible with large-scale screens, while not raising ethical issues. The Latsis Symposium wanted to bridge the gap between microfluidic systems and biological model organism research, by providing an interdisciplinary forum on the technology and applications of microfluidic systems for studies of multicellular organisms in medicine and biology.

Topics covered in each of the sessions were:

  • Phenotyping
  • Imaging Techniques
  • High-throughput techniques
  • Neurobiology
  • Physiology and Development Studies


Among the speakers presenting at the symposium was Prof. Hang Lu (School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia, USA), Lab on a Chip Advisory Board member, who spoke on “Deep Phenotyping Enabled by Microfluidics and High-Throughput Quantitative Microscopy”.

Li Dong's winning poster on "On-chip biocommunication through exchange of compounds secreted by male C. elegans nematodes"

A distinction for the best contributed poster of the Symposium was given to Ph.D. student Li Dong of the Laboratory of Microsystems of EPFL. He received an electronic subscription to the RSC journals Lab on a Chip and Integrative Biology.

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Major society chemistry publishers jointly commit to integration with ORCID

ORCID provides an identifier for individuals to use with their name as they engage in research, scholarship and innovation activities, ensuring authors gain full credit for their work.

Today, we signed their open letter, along with ACS Publications, committing to unambiguous identification of all authors that publish in our journals.

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The Royal Society of Chemistry and the Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) today each became signatories to the ORCID Open Letter, reasserting the commitment of both organizations to enhancing the scholarly publishing experience for researchers worldwide who are involved in chemistry and allied fields.

The commitment by these two global chemistry publishers to undertake new workflow integration with technology infrastructure provided by ORCID, a not-for-profit organization that provides unique identifiers for researchers and scholars, will enable both societies to provide unambiguous designation of author names within chemistry and across the broader sciences. This partnership with ORCID will resolve ambiguity in researcher identification caused by name changes, cultural differences in name presentation, and the inconsistent use of name abbreviations that is too often a source of confusion for those who must rely on the published scientific record.

By becoming signatories to the ORCID Open Letter, these two major chemical societies are voicing their intent to collect ORCID iDs for all submitting authors through use of the ORCID API, and to display such identifiers in the articles published in their respective society journals. The integration of such activities within the publishers’ workflows means authors will benefit from automated linkages between their ORCID record and unique identifiers embedded within their published research articles, ensuring their contributions are appropriately recognized and credited.

During the publishing process, ACS and the Royal Society of Chemistry will automatically deposit publications to Crossref, which in turn will coordinate with ORCID to link and update the publishing activity populated to authors’ respective ORCID profiles, thus attributing each published work to the correct researcher. Existing holders of an ORCID iD will encounter a one-time prompt to grant permission for the linkage. If authors do not have an ORCID iD, they can easily enroll without navigating away from the publishers’ manuscript submission site. If users wish to revoke integrated ORCID profile access at any time, they can elect to do so through their ACS, Royal Society of Chemistry or ORCID accounts.

Both ACS Publications and the Royal Society of Chemistry understand the importance of attributing accurately the scholarly contributions of research scientists in the context of their other professional activities. “ACS has supported ORCID since the outset of the initiative,” says Sarah Tegen, Ph.D., Vice President of Global Editorial & Author Services at ACS Publications. “We are pleased now to align with the Royal Society of Chemistry in this endeavor, as both societies underscore our willingness not only to encourage and assist our respective authors in establishing their unique ORCID profiles, but also to help tackle the broader challenge of researcher name disambiguation in the scholarly literature. With the integration of author ORCID iDs in our publishing workflows, we will ensure that researchers receive proper credit for their accomplishments.”

Emma Wilson, Ph.D., Director of Publishing at the Royal Society of Chemistry adds, “We have been a supporter of ORCID since 2013, recognizing the benefits it brings to researchers; ORCID can and will make a huge difference to our authors’ ability to gain full credit for their work. ORCID will also help researchers meet the requirements of their research funders — for example, a number of funders have already announced that all grant applicants must now include a researcher’s ORCID iD. A unified system that integrates and links research-related information with accurate and timely linkage to the publishing output of authors has the potential to simplify and speed up their grant applications — something we know is important to researchers.”

“The ACS and the Royal Society of Chemistry have been long-standing supporters of ORCID,” says Laurel Haak, Ph.D., Executive Director, ORCID. “We are pleased to see ORCID integration into ACS and Royal Society of Chemistry Publications systems. This will be a substantial benefit to researchers in the chemistry community, both in improving search and discovery of research articles, and for attribution and recognition of researchers’ contributions to the discipline.”

About the American Chemical Society and ACS Publications

The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With nearly 157,000 members, ACS is the world’s largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

ACS Publications, a division of the American Chemical Society, is a nonprofit scholarly publisher of 50 peer-reviewed journals and a range of eBooks at the interface of chemistry and allied sciences, including physics and biology. ACS Publications journals are among the most-cited, most-trusted and most-read within the scientific literature. Respected for their editorial rigor, ACS journals offer high-quality service to authors and readers, including rapid time to publication, a range of channels for researchers to access ACS Publications’ award-winning web and mobile delivery platforms, and a comprehensive program of open access publishing options for authors and their funders. ACS Publications also publishes Chemical & Engineering News — the Society’s newsmagazine covering science and technology, business and industry, government and policy, education and employment aspects of the chemistry field.

About the Royal Society of Chemistry

The Royal Society of Chemistry is the world’s leading chemistry community, advancing excellence in the chemical sciences. With over 50,000 members and a knowledge business that spans the globe, we are the U.K.’s professional body for chemical scientists; a not-for-profit organisation with 175 years of history and an international vision for the future. We promote, support and celebrate chemistry. We work to shape the future of the chemical sciences — for the benefit of science and humanity.

About ORCID

ORCID’s vision is a world where all who participate in research, scholarship and innovation are uniquely identified and connected to their contributions across disciplines, borders and time. ORCID provides an identifier for individuals to use with their name as they engage in research, scholarship and innovation activities. It provides open tools that enable transparent and trustworthy connections between researchers, their contributions and affiliations. The organization provides this service to help people find information and to simplify reporting and analysis. ORCID is a not-for-profit organization, sustained by fees from member organizations. Its work is open, transparent and non-proprietary. The organization strives to be a trusted component of research infrastructure with the goal of providing clarity in the breadth of research contributions and the people who make them.

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