MMB 2108

The 9th International Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology (MMB 2018) is being held in California, USA on March 26-28, 2018

The primary purpose of the conference is to foster interactions between biologists and medical researchers; chemists, physicists and engineers to enhance and strengthen the potential of microtechnologies in revolutionizing the fields of medicine and biological sciences through the development of new research tools and technologies.

The conference is set to have a great talks, with Keynote lectures from Seok “Sid” Chung, Korea University; Jianping Fu, University of Michigan; Amy Herr, University of California, Berkeley; Henry Hess, Columbia University; Marianna Kruithof-de Julio, University of Bern; and Milica Radisic, University of Toronto.

Key Dates:

Late News deadline: 6th February 2018

Early Bird Registration: 13th February 2018

Regular Registration: 21st March 2018

 

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What are your colleagues reading in Integrative Biology?

The articles below are some of the most read Integrative Biology articles in 2017 so far. You can view the full collection of our top 10 downloaded articles here. These articles will be free to access* for the next four weeks with a free publishing personal account – register here.

A selection of these articles is shown below:

Review articles

Liquid biopsy on chip: a paradigm shift towards the understanding of cancer metastasis
Amogha Tadimety, Abeer Syed, Yuan Nie, Christina R. Long, Kasia M. Kready and John X. J. Zhang

New advances in probing cell–extracellular matrix interactions
Allen P. Liu, Ovijit Chaudhuri and Sapun H. Parekh

Papers

PEG–peptide hydrogels reveal differential effects of matrix microenvironmental cues on melanoma drug sensitivity
Emi Y. Tokuda, Caitlin E. Jones and Kristi S. Anseth

Integrating perfusable vascular networks with a three-dimensional tissue in a microfluidic device
Yuji Nashimoto, Tomoya Hayashi, Itsuki Kunita, Akiko Nakamasu, Yu-suke Torisawa, Masamune Nakayama, Hisako Takigawa-Imamura, Hidetoshi Kotera, Koichi Nishiyama, Takashi Miura and Ryuji Yokokawa

Correlation of focal adhesion assembly and disassembly with cell migration on nanotopography
Elena I. Liang, Emma J. Mah, Albert F. Yee and Michelle A. Digman
Keep up-to-date with the latest issues of Integrative Biology by joining our e-alerts.

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Blue screen of cell death

Written for Chemistry World by James Tipper

Low intensity blue light from smartphones and televisions kills human retinal cells

Short wavelength blue light produced by low intensity displays such as smartphones and televisions has been identified as being damaging to human eye cells by a group of Korean researchers. The scientists believe that their study could encourage development of devices that are less harmful to our eyes.

Scientists have previously discovered that blue light, especially at shorter wavelengths, can damage cells in the retina, the light-sensitive layer of tissue that lines the inside of our eyes. Blue light produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide radicals, in retinal cells. This can lead to cell death. However, previous research has focused on high intensity light, such as that from light emitting diode lamps.

As our lives are increasingly spent staring at phones, laptops and televisions, Young Pyo Jang from Kyung Hee University, Jong Soon Kang from the Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology and their team have now investigated the effect of low intensity blue light on retinal cells. They found that short wavelength blue light doubles the death rate in human retinal cells compared with cells kept in the dark.

 

Read the full article in Chemistry World.


Blue light effect on retinal pigment epithelial cells by display devices
Jiyoung Moon, Jieun Yun, Yeo Dae Yoon, Sang-Il Park, Young-Jun Seo, Won-Sang Park, Hye Yong Chu, Keun Hong Park, Myung Yeol Lee, Chang Woo Lee, Soo Jin Oh, Young-Shin Kwak, Young Pyo Jang and Jong Soon Kang

Integr. Biol., 2017, Advance Article

DOI: 10.1039/C7IB00032D

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Single Cell Science and Technology Microfluidics Symposium 2017

Single Cell Science and Technology
Microfluidics Symposium 2017
May 3, 2017, 11:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.
NCRC Bldg. 10 Auditorium, Bldg. 18 – Dining Hall


Also including presentations by University of Michigan Faculty and Students

Call for Abstracts for Poster Session
To be considered for podium presentation, submit by March 31, 2017
Deadline for all abstracts: April 18, 2017
Poster Information/Submission: metzlerp@umich.edu
Poster prizes sponsored by MCIRCC and RSC Publishing

 

For more information, see their flyer and click here to register

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Outstanding Reviewers for Integrative Biology in 2016

Following the success of Peer Review Week in September 2016 (dedicated to reviewer recognition) during which we published a list of our top reviewers, we are delighted to announce that we will continue to recognise the contribution that our reviewers make to the journal by announcing our Outstanding Reviewers each year.

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Integrative Biology in 2016, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Dr Nakwon Choi, Korea Institute of Science and Technology
Dr Rong Fan, Yale University
Dr  Ryuzo Kawamura, Saitama Daigaku
Dr  Kristen Mills, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Dr  Chris  Moraes, McGill University
Dr Shelly Peyton, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Professor  Paolo  Provenzano, University of Minnesota System
Dr  Takeshi  Teramura, Kinki Daigaku
Dr Joe Tien, Boston University
Dr  Scott  Verbridge, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

We would also like to thank the Integrative Biology board and the biology community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

 

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

 

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Zinc spark shows sperm the chequered flag

Researchers shed light on new explanation for how mammalian zygotes safeguard their survival

Bursts of zinc released within minutes of fertilisation stop reproductive chaos by preventing multiple sperm from binding to eggs, new research shows. 

A team led by Teresa Woodruff and Thomas O’Halloran at Northwestern University, US, first witnessed the almost immediate efflux of billions of zinc ions upon mammalian egg fertilisation with x-ray fluorescence microscopy in 2010. These zinc sparks look like supernovae, according to O’Halloran. Diffusing away from the cell’s membrane, the zinc ions encounter the zona pellucida, a glycoprotein matrix surrounding the egg. Now the team has revealed that zinc retained by the zona pellucida induces changes that harden its protein structure within 30–60 minutes of fertilisation, making it more resistant to sperm binding.

Read the full article in Chemistry World.


Zinc sparks induce physiochemical changes in the egg zona pellucida that prevent polyspermy

Emily L. Que, Francesca E. Duncan, Amanda R. Bayer, Steven J. Philips, Eric W. Roth, Reiner Bleher, Sophie C. Gleber, Stefan Vogt, Teresa K. Woodruff and Thomas V. O’Halloran

DOI: 10.1039/c6ib00212a

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Biophysical Society: 61st Annual Meeting

The Biophysical Societies 61st Annual Meeting will be held in New Orleans, Louisiana on 11th to 15th February this year. The conference aims to bring together scientists working “at the interface of the life, physical, and computational sciences”. The 5 day event includes “Saturday Subgroup” symposia, allowing attendees to meet within their specific scientific communities.

We are delighted to announce that Integrative Biology will be sponsoring the Mechanobiology symposium! The session is chaired by Ewa Paluch from the University of London and includes talks by Ana J. García-Sáez (University of Tuebingen), Nikita Fakhri (MIT) and Kevin J Chalut (University of Cambridge). For more details on the program and to register to attend, visit the conference webpage.

Integrative Biology publishes innovative work in which new biological insights have been achieved through the use of developing technologies from the nano to macroscale. It is a home for all areas of mechanobiology, from molecular to organ scale, experimental, theoretical and computational analysis. If you are working in this area, then we would be delighted if you would consider publishing your work with us!

Interested in Mechanobiology, but can’t make this meeting? Why not read Integrative Biology’s recent themed issue on topic here –  http://rsc.li/1jsLAGD 

 

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What are your colleagues reading in Integrative Biology?

The articles below are some of the most read Integrative Biology articles in 2016. You can view the full collection of our top 10 downloaded articles here.

Mimicking the topography of the epidermal–dermal interface with elastomer substrates
Priyalakshmi Viswanathan, Murat Guvendiren, Wesley Chua, Stephanie B. Telerman, Kifayathullah Liakath-Ali, Jason A. Burdick and Fiona M. Watt

 

Genetically modified bacteriophages
Antonia P. Sagona, Aurelija M. Grigonyte, Paul R. MacDonald and Alfonso Jaramillo

 

Time series modeling of live-cell shape dynamics for image-based phenotypic profiling
Simon Gordonov, Mun Kyung Hwang, Alan Wells, Frank B. Gertler, Douglas A. Lauffenburger and Mark Bathe

 

The appeasement of Doug: a synthetic approach to enhancer biology
Ben J. Vincent, Javier Estrada and Angela H. DePace

 

Mechanical phenotyping of primary human skeletal stem cells in heterogeneous populations by real-time deformability cytometry
Miguel Xavier, Philipp Rosendahl, Maik Herbig, Martin Kräter, Daniel Spencer, Martin Bornhäuser, Richard O. C. Oreffo, Hywel Morgan, Jochen Guck and Oliver Otto

 

Keep up-to-date with the latest issues of Integrative Biology by joining our e-alerts.

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CellMatrix poster prize winners

The CellMatrix poster prize winners: Lakshmi Kavitha Sthanam (left) and Asja Guzman (right)

Many congratulations to Lakshmi Kavitha Sthanam (IIT Bombay) and Asja Guzman (Columbia University) on winning the poster prizes at the International Conference on New Advances in Probing Cell-Extracellular Matrix Interactions (CellMatrix). Integrative Biology was the proud sponsor of these poster prizes and the winners received book vouchers and Royal Society of Chemistry certificates.

This meeting took place in Berlin, Germany from 20th to the 21st October, and it highlighted the application of novel experimental tools and technologies for probing cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Sessions covered a wide range of topics including mechanobiology and methods for cell-extracellular matrix visualisation. Please visit the conference website for more details on the themes and speakers.

 

Many congratulations on this achievement from the Integrative Biology team!

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Symposium Latsis EPFL 2016: Multicellular organisms in microfluidic systems

The Symposium Latsis EPFL 2016 “Multicellular organisms in microfluidic systems” was held from 14 November 2016 to 16 November 2016 at the EPFL campus in Lausanne (Switzerland). The event was co-organised by Prof. Johan Auwerx andLab on a Chip Advisory Board member Prof. Martin Gijs.

PhD student Li Dong was presented the Poster Award

Studies of living organisms like nematodes and invertebrate embryos in controlled spatio-temporal chemical environments on microfluidic chips are gaining momentum, as these animals offer genetic amenability, low-cost, and culture conditions that are compatible with large-scale screens, while not raising ethical issues. The Latsis Symposium wanted to bridge the gap between microfluidic systems and biological model organism research, by providing an interdisciplinary forum on the technology and applications of microfluidic systems for studies of multicellular organisms in medicine and biology.

Topics covered in each of the sessions were:

  • Phenotyping
  • Imaging Techniques
  • High-throughput techniques
  • Neurobiology
  • Physiology and Development Studies


Among the speakers presenting at the symposium was Prof. Hang Lu (School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia, USA), Lab on a Chip Advisory Board member, who spoke on “Deep Phenotyping Enabled by Microfluidics and High-Throughput Quantitative Microscopy”.

Li Dong's winning poster on "On-chip biocommunication through exchange of compounds secreted by male C. elegans nematodes"

A distinction for the best contributed poster of the Symposium was given to Ph.D. student Li Dong of the Laboratory of Microsystems of EPFL. He received an electronic subscription to the RSC journals Lab on a Chip and Integrative Biology.

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