Archive for the ‘Themed Issue’ Category

Themed Collection online Molecular Design for Reduced Toxicity

Click through to read the Themed Collection online Molecular Design for Reduced Toxicity guest edited by Paul Anastas, Julie Zimmerman and Adelina Voutchkova-Kostal.

Molecular design for reduced toxicity is an area of green chemistry which seeks to increase our understanding and enable the design of molecules across structural classes and applications that can provide the required functions, without the undesirable toxicity.

Safer by Design
Paul T. Anastas and Julie B. Zimmerman
Green Chem., 2016,18, 4324-4324
DOI: 10.1039/C6GC90074G
Probabilistic diagram for designing chemicals with reduced potency to incur cytotoxicity
Longzhu Q. Shen, Richard S. Judson, Fjodor Melnikov, John Roethle, Aditya Gudibanda, Julie B. Zimmerman and Paul T. Anastas
Green Chem., 2016,18, 4461-4467
DOI: 10.1039/C6GC01058J

A chemical–biological similarity-based grouping of complex substances as a prototype approach for evaluating chemical alternatives
Fabian A. Grimm, Yasuhiro Iwata, Oksana Sirenko, Grace A. Chappell, Fred A. Wright, David M. Reif, John Braisted, David L. Gerhold, Joanne M. Yeakley, Peter Shepard, Bruce Seligmann, Tim Roy, Peter J. Boogaard, Hans B. Ketelslegers, Arlean M. Rohde and Ivan Rusyn
Green Chem., 2016,18, 4407-4419
DOI: 10.1039/C6GC01147K

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Lignin Chemistry and Valorisation – Green Chemistry themed issue

Green Chemistry is pleased to announce the publication of the Lignin Chemistry and Valorisation themed issue. The Guest Editors for this issue are Professor Bert Weckhuysen (Utrecht University, Netherlands), Dr Pieter Bruijnincx (Utrecht University, Netherlands) and Dr Roberto Rinaldi (Imperial College London, UK).

Recently, the scientific community has made significant progress in engineering lignin, characterising its structural features, valorising the biopolymer through catalysis, and finding new outlets for the lignin-derived products. The aim of this themed issue is to show the latest developments in the field of lignin chemistry and valorisation.

Below are some high quality Open Access articles in the collection. You can view the full collection here.

Efficient catalytic hydrotreatment of Kraft lignin to alkylphenolics using supported NiW and NiMo catalysts in supercritical methanol
Anand Narani, Ramesh Kumar Chowdari, Catia Cannilla, Giuseppe Bonura, Francesco Frusteri, Hero Jan Heeres and Katalin Barta
Green Chem., 2015, 17, 5046-5057. DOI: 10.1039/C5GC01643F


The synthesis and analysis of advanced lignin model polymers
C. S. Lancefield and N. J. Westwood
Green Chem., 2015, 17, 4980-4990. DOI: 10.1039/C5GC01334H


Ethanol as capping agent and formaldehyde scavenger for efficient depolymerization of lignin to aromatics
Xiaoming Huang, Tamás I. Korányi, Michael D. Boot and Emiel J. M. Hensen
Green Chem., 2015, 17, 4941-4950. DOI: 10.1039/C5GC01120E


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Green Chemistry themed issue on Elemental Recovery and Sustainability now online

Issue 4 of Green Chemistry is a part themed issue on ‘Elemental Recovery and Sustainability focusing on how we can develop methods to ensure that elements are available for use by future generations through sustainable use and recovery.

The guest editors for this themed collection are James Clark (University of York, UK), Andrew Hunt (University of York, UK), Avtar Matharu (University of York, UK) and Alex King (Ames Labs, USA), read their editorial for free here.

The outside front cover of the issue features the Critical Review “Bio-derived materials as a green route for precious & critical metal recovery and re-use” by Jennifer R. Dodson, Helen L. Parker, Andrea Muñoz García, Alexandra Hicken, Kaana Asemave, Thomas J. Farmer, He He, James H. Clark and Andrew J. Hunt. In this article they give an overview of research in critical and precious metal recovery using biosorption, application to real-life wastes and uses of the metal-loaded materials.

The inside front cover of the issue features the Paper “Recycling of rare earths from NdFeB magnets using a combined leaching/extraction system based on the acidity and thermomorphism of the ionic liquid [Hbet][Tf2N]” by David Duponta and Koen Binnemans. In this article they describe how a new recycling process was developed to recover rare earths from roasted NdFeB magnets using the thermomorphic and acidic properties of the ionic liquid [Hbet][Tf2N] to achieve a combined leaching/extraction system.

These two articles are free to access until 15th May and there are also a number of open access articles within the issue:

Greening the global phosphorus cycle: how green chemistry can help achieve planetary P sustainability” by Paul J. A. Withers, James J. Elser, Julian Hilton, Hisao Ohtake, Willem J. Schipper and Kimo C. van Dijk.
Chameleon behaviour of iodine in recovering noble-metals from WEEE: towards sustainability and “zero” waste” by Angela Serpe, Americo Rigoldi, Claudia Marras, Flavia Artizzu, Maria Laura Mercuri and Paola Deplano.
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New articles added to 15 years of Green Chemistry web collection

To mark the occasion of Green Chemistry completing fifteen years of publication we invited contributions from authors who have had highly cited articles from each of the past 15 years. The result is a growing web collection covering topics of current importance in green chemistry from those who have contributed to developing the field. Details of the contributors, their highly cited article from the year they are representing, and their recent contribution are below.

Two recent additions to the collection are from Professor Chinzia Chiappe (University of Pisa), and Dr Peter Dunn (Pfizer).

Professor Chiappe’s 2006  article Acute toxicity of ionic liquids to the zebrafish (Danio rerio)is amongst the highest that year. She has continued on this ionic liquids theme by contributing to the 15 years of Green Chemsitry collection a Critical Review asking  Are ionic liquids a proper solution to current environmental challenges?

In 2007, Dr Dunn was the lead author on a Perspective article produced from the ACS GCI Pharmaceutical Roundable entitled Key green chemistry research areas—a perspective from pharmaceutical manufacturers. His contribution to the 15 years of Green Chemistry collection is another Perspective with an Industrial themePharmaceutical Green Chemistry process changes – how long does it take to obtain regulatory approval?’.

All of these articles are free to access until the end of July 2014. The 15 Years of Green Chemistry collection will be added to throughout 2014 and you can access the articles by clicking on the titles below, or look at the full collection of recent articles online here.

Year 15 Years of Green Chemistry Contribution Original Highly Cited Article
1999 Journey on greener pathways: from the use of alternate energy inputs and benign reaction media to sustainable applications of nano-catalysts in synthesis and environmental remediation
Rajender S. Varma, 2014, Perspective
Solvent-free organic syntheses. using supported reagents and microwave irradiation, Rajender S. Varma, 1999, Paper
2000 Food waste biomass: a resource for high-value chemicals
Lucie A. Pfaltzgraff, Mario De bruyn, Emma C. Cooper, Vitaly Budarin and James H. Clark, 2013, Perspective
Preparation of a novel silica-supported palladium catalyst and its use in the Heck reaction
James H. Clark, Duncan J. Macquarrie and Egid B. Mubofu, 2000, Paper
2001 Mixing ionic liquids – “simple mixtures” or “double salts”?
Gregory Chatel, Jorge F. B. Pereira, Varun Debbeti, Hui Wang and Robin D. Rogers, 2014, Critical Review
Characterization and comparison of hydrophilic and hydrophobic room temperature ionic liquids incorporating the imidazolium cation, Jonathan G. Huddleston, Ann E. Visser, W. Matthew Reichert, Heather D. Willauer, Grant A. Broker and Robin D. Rogers, 2001, paper
2005 Green and sustainable manufacture of chemicals from biomass: state of the art
Roger A. Sheldon, 2014, Critical Review
Green solvents for sustainable organic synthesis: state of the art
Roger A. Sheldon, 2005, Critical Review
2006 Are ionic liquids a proper solution to current environmental challenges?
Giorgio Cevasco and Cinzia Chiappe, 2014, Critical Review
Acute toxicity of ionic liquids to the zebrafish (Danio rerio)
Carlo Pretti, Cinzia Chiappe, Daniela Pieraccini, Michela Gregori, Francesca Abramo, Gianfranca Monni and Luigi Intorre, 2006, Communication
2007 Pharmaceutical Green Chemistry process changes – how long does it take to obtain regulatory approval?
Peter J. Dunn, 2013, Perspective
Key green chemistry research areas—a perspective from pharmaceutical manufacturers
David J. C. Constable, Peter J. Dunn, John D. Hayler, Guy R. Humphrey, Johnnie L. Leazer, Jr., Russell J. Linderman, Kurt Lorenz, Julie Manley, Bruce A. Pearlman, Andrew Wells, Aleksey Zaks and Tony Y. Zhang, 2007, Perspective
2008 Towards resource efficient chemistry: Tandem reactions with renewables
Arno Behr, Andreas Johannes Vorholt, Thomas Seidensticker and Karoline Anna Ostrowski, 2013, Critical Review
Improved utilisation of renewable resources: New important derivatives of glycerol
Arno Behr, Jens Eilting, Ken Irawadi, Julia Leschinski and Falk Lindner, 2008, Critical Review
2009 Conversion of glucose and cellulose into value-added products in water and ionic liquids
Jinliang Song, Honglei Fan, Jun Ma and Buxing, 2013, Tutorial Review
Efficient conversion of glucose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural catalyzed by a common Lewis acid SnCl4 in an ionic liquid
Suqin Hu, Zhaofu Zhang, Jinliang Song, Yinxi Zhou and Buxing Han, 2009, Communication
2011 Conversion of biomass platform molecules into fuel additives and liquid hydrocarbon fuels
Maria J. Climent, Avelino Corma and Sara Iborra, 2014, Critical Review
Converting carbohydrates to bulk chemicals and fine chemicals over heterogeneous catalysts
Maria J. Climent, Avelino Corma and Sara Iborra, 2011, Critical Review
2012 Continuous process technology: a tool for sustainable production
Charlotte Wiles and Paul Watts, 2014, Tutorial Review
Continuous flow reactors: a perspective
Charlotte Wiles and Paul Watts, 2012, Tutorial Review
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Green Chemistry Issue 4 of 2014 now online!

Issue 4 of Green Chemistry is a part-themed issue on ‘Sustainable polymers: reduced environmental impact, renewable raw materials and catalysis’. Guest Editor Professor Michael Meier (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany) introduces the issue in his Editorial.

This special issue is being published in collaboration with our sister journal Polymer Chemistry who will soon be publishing their issue on ‘Sustainable polymers: replacing polymers derived from fossil fuels Guest Edited by Stephen A. Miller (University of Florida, USA). The two issues will be collated online – look out for the full ‘Sustainable Polymers’ collection later this month on our Themed Collections tab.

GC016004_OFC_PUBLICITYThe outside front cover features the communication “Marine-degradable polylactic acid” by Ryan T. Martin, Ludmila P. Camargo and Stephen A. Miller.

Issue 4 contains a number of excellent Perspective articles, Critical and Tutorial Reviews:

Towards sustainable polymer chemistry with homogeneous metal-based catalysts
Kristin Schröder, Krzysztof Matyjaszewski, Kevin J. T. Noonan and   Robert T. Mathers

Hydrogen-bonding organocatalysts for ring-opening polymerization
Coralie Thomas and Brigitte Bibal

Matrices from vegetable oils, cashew nut shell liquid, and other relevant systems for biocomposite applications
Rafael L. Quirino, Thomas F. Garrison and Michael R. Kessler  

Renewable terephthalate polyesters from carbohydrate-based bicyclic monomers
Sebastián Muñoz-Guerra, Cristina Lavilla, Cristina Japu and Antxon Martínez de Ilarduya    

The use of lipases as biocatalysts for the epoxidation of fatty acids and phenolic compounds
Chahinez Aouf, Erwann Durand, Jérôme Lecomte, Maria-Cruz Figueroa-Espinoza, Eric Dubreucq, Hélène Fulcrand and Pierre Villeneuve


Water at elevated temperatures (WET): reactant, catalyst, and solvent in the selective hydrolysis of protecting groups” is the paper highlighted on the inside front cover by Wilmarie Medina-Ramos, Mike A. Mojica, Elizabeth D. Cope, Ryan J. Hart, Pamela Pollet, Charles A. Eckert and Charles L. Liotta 

Perspective articles, Critical and Tutorial Reviews from Issue 4:

Hydroxymethylfurfural production from bioresources: past, present and future
Siew Ping Teong, Guangshun Yi and Yugen Zhang

Journey on greener pathways: from the use of alternate energy inputs and benign reaction media to sustainable applications of nano-catalysts in synthesis and environmental remediation
Rajender S. Varma

Carbonylation in microflow: close encounters of CO and reactive species
Takahide Fukuyama, Takenori Totoki and Ilhyong Ryu

Mixing ionic liquids – “simple mixtures” or “double salts”?
Gregory Chatel, Jorge F. B. Pereira, Varun Debbeti, Hui Wang and Robin D. Rogers

Heterocycle construction using the biomass-derived building block itaconic acid
Alexandra M. Medway and   Jonathan Sperry        
      
Keep up-to-date with the latest content in Green Chemistry by registering for our free table of contents alerts.

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Green Chemistry issue 2 is now available online

Issue 2 of Green Chemistry is a themed issue on the conversion of biomass with heterogeneous catalysts, Guest Edited by Professors Paul Dauenhauer and George Huber. It’s available to read online now.

GC issue 2 coverThe front cover this month (pictured left) features a review by Jesse Hensley and co-workers from Golden, Colorado. In their article they focus on recent model compound studies of catalysts for hydrodeoxygenation of biomass pyrolysis products, with an emphasis on mechanisms, reaction networks, and structure–function relationships.

Read the full article:
Recent advances in heterogeneous catalysts for bio-oil upgrading via “ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis”: catalyst development through the study of model compounds
Daniel A. Ruddy, Joshua A. Schaidle, Jack R. Ferrell III, Jun Wang, Luc Moens and Jesse E. Hensley  
Green Chem., 2014, 16, 454-490, DOI: 10.1039/C3GC41354C


GC issue 2 inside coverThe inside front cover this month (pictured right) features work by Andreas Heyden and co-workers from Columbia, South Carolina. In their work they report a theoretical study of the effects of various solvents on the mechanism of the hydrodeoxygenation of propanoic acid over Pd(111).

Read the full article:
Solvent effects on the hydrodeoxygenation of propanoic acid over Pd(111) model surfaces
Sina Behtash, Jianmin Lu, Muhammad Faheem and Andreas Heyden  
Green Chem., 2014, 16, 605-616, DOI: 10.1039/C3GC41368C

Both of these articles are free to access for 6 weeks!

Keep up-to-date with the latest content in Green Chemistry by registering for our free table of contents alerts.

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Web Collection marking 15 years of publication of Green Chemistry

To mark the occasion of Green Chemistry completing fifteen years of publication we invited contributions from authors who have had highly cited articles from each of the past 15 years. The result is a growing web collection covering topics of current importance in green chemistry from those who have contributed to developing the field. Details of the contributors, their highly cited article from the year they are representing, and their recent contribution are below. 

Accompanying this collection and further celebrating ‘15 years of Green Chemistry’ is an Editorial containing contributions from all of Green Chemistry’s Chairs of the Editorial board and Scientific Editors giving their views on the area of green chemistry and the changes they have seen since the Journal was launched in 1999… read the Editorial here.

The 15 Years of Green Chemistry collection will be added to throughout 2014 and you can access the articles by clicking on the titles below, or look at the full collection of recent articles online here

Year 15 Years of Green Chemistry Contribution Original Highly Cited Article
1999 Journey on greener pathways: from the use of alternate energy inputs and benign reaction media to sustainable applications of nano-catalysts in synthesis and environmental remediation
Rajender S. Varma, 2014, Perspective
Solvent-free organic syntheses. using supported reagents and microwave irradiation, Rajender S. Varma, 1999, Paper
2000 Food waste biomass: a resource for high-value chemicals
Lucie A. Pfaltzgraff, Mario De bruyn, Emma C. Cooper, Vitaly Budarin and  James H. Clark, 2013, Perspective
Preparation of a novel silica-supported palladium catalyst and its use in the Heck reaction
James H. Clark, Duncan J. Macquarrie and Egid B. Mubofu, 2000, Paper
2001 Mixing ionic liquids – “simple mixtures” or “double salts”?
Gregory Chatel, Jorge F. B. Pereira, Varun Debbeti, Hui Wang and Robin D. Rogers, 2014, Critical Review
Characterization and comparison of hydrophilic and hydrophobic room temperature ionic liquids incorporating the imidazolium cation, Jonathan G. Huddleston, Ann E. Visser, W. Matthew Reichert, Heather D. Willauer, Grant A. Broker and Robin D. Rogers, 2001, paper
2005 Green and sustainable manufacture of chemicals from biomass: state of the art
Roger A. Sheldon, 2014, Critical Review
Green solvents for sustainable organic synthesis: state of the art
Roger A. Sheldon, 2005, Critical Review
2006 Are ionic liquids a proper solution to current environmental challenges?
Giorgio Cevasco and Cinzia Chiappe, 2014, Critical Review
Acute toxicity of ionic liquids to the zebrafish (Danio rerio)
Carlo Pretti, Cinzia Chiappe, Daniela Pieraccini, Michela Gregori, Francesca Abramo, Gianfranca Monni and Luigi Intorre, 2006, Communication
2007 Pharmaceutical Green Chemistry process changes – how long does it take to obtain regulatory approval?
Peter J. Dunn, 2013, Perspective
Key green chemistry research areas—a perspective from pharmaceutical manufacturers
David J. C. Constable, Peter J. Dunn, John D. Hayler, Guy R. Humphrey, Johnnie L. Leazer, Jr., Russell J. Linderman, Kurt Lorenz, Julie Manley, Bruce A. Pearlman, Andrew Wells, Aleksey Zaks and Tony Y. Zhang, 2007, Perspective
2008 Towards resource efficient chemistry: Tandem reactions with renewables
Arno Behr, Andreas Johannes Vorholt, Thomas Seidensticker and Karoline Anna Ostrowski, 2013, Critical Review
Improved utilisation of renewable resources: New important derivatives of glycerol
Arno Behr, Jens Eilting, Ken Irawadi, Julia Leschinski and Falk Lindner, 2008, Critical Review
2009 Conversion of glucose and cellulose into value-added products in water and ionic liquids
Jinliang Song, Honglei Fan, Jun Ma and Buxing, 2013, Tutorial Review
Efficient conversion of glucose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural catalyzed by a common Lewis acid SnCl4 in an ionic liquid
Suqin Hu, Zhaofu Zhang, Jinliang Song, Yinxi Zhou and Buxing Han, 2009, Communication
2011 Conversion of biomass platform molecules into fuel additives and liquid hydrocarbon fuels
Maria J. Climent, Avelino Corma and Sara Iborra, 2014, Critical Review
Converting carbohydrates to bulk chemicals and fine chemicals over heterogeneous catalysts
Maria J. Climent, Avelino Corma and Sara Iborra, 2011, Critical Review
2012 Continuous process technology: a tool for sustainable production
Charlotte Wiles and Paul Watts, 2014, Tutorial Review
Continuous flow reactors: a perspective
Charlotte Wiles and Paul Watts, 2012, Tutorial Review
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Editorial celebrating 15 years of Green Chemistry

James Clark (Scientific Editor, 199-2003)

James Clark, Scientific Editor, 1999-2003

The first issue of Green Chemistry was published in January 1999; as 2013 comes to a close we are celebrating the completion of 15 years of publication. Over these 15 years articles published in the Journal have recorded the evolving priorities in green chemistry research.

To mark this significant milestone we invited past Chairs of the Editorial Board and Scientific Editors for their views on the area of green chemistry, and the changes they have seen since the Journal was launched.

The result is a wonderfully thought-provoking Editorial which is published in 2014 Issue 1 and we hope you enjoy reading.

Read the Editorial celebrating 15 years of Green Chemistry online for free here.

Walter Leitner (Scientific Editor 2004-2012 and Editorial Board Chair 2012-Present)

Walter Leitner, Scientific Editor 2004-2012 and Editorial Board Chair 2012-Present

Roger Sheldon (Editorial Board Chair 1999-2001)

Roger Sheldon, Editorial Board Chair 1999-2001

Colin Raston (Editorial Board Chair 2002-2005)

Colin Raston, Editorial Board Chair 2002-2005

Martyn Poliakoff (Editorial Board Chair 2006-2011)

Martyn Poliakoff, Editorial Board Chair 2006-2011


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Green Solvents – Mission Completed or Mission Impossible?

The search for alternatives to volatile organic solvents is one of the continuing major themes in Green Chemistry. “Solvents” are explicitly mentioned in principle 5 of the 12 Green Chemistry Principles, but their use impacts of course also directly on issues such as waste prevention, energy efficiency, and safety. The search for alternative materials and concepts to facilitate solution phase processes towards the goals of sustainability forms a natural link between Green Chemistry and Engineering. Since the year 2000, the biennial conference “Green Solvents” brings together researchers from academia and industry, as well as students, to discuss the progress in science and application in this area. As in previous years, the presenters at the 2012 edition of the conference have been invited to contribute a review or original research paper to the journal and you will find the resulting articles bundled in this issue.

The organization of six editions of this meeting together with Peter Wasserscheid and Ken Seddon has been scientifically most rewarding and personally a real pleasure. The concept to organize the program without parallel sessions, arranging it according to the scientific and technical challenges rather than the materials or methods has led to most fruitful interactions and stimulating discussions. One of the most striking developments reflected across the board is that the advanced fluids such as ionic liquids, supercritical fluids, water, or liquid polymers are often not adequately described as “solvents” when used for molecular transformations or separation techniques. They act as additives, stabilizers, matrices, switchable components, catalysts, etc. Unlike with traditional solvents, only very small amounts of the fluids are often required, for example to combine reactivity and separation in catalyst immobilization. Smart systems change their properties upon external stimuli or directly interact with reactive components to steer a reaction. Reaction engineering concepts for flow chemistry open new approaches with these materials and vice versa. So, are we at the stage “Mission Completed”?

Actually – I don’t really think so: striving for sustainability is an iterative process and if we are doing well, we can always do better! Immobilizing a catalyst today, we are already satisfied if it retains largely its activity and selectivity from solution; very often, we find that the supporting matrix interacts with the catalyst leading to a reduced performance. There is no reason why the interaction should not lead to an activation or increase in selectivity! In fact, there are a – still slowly – increasing number of observations that support this idea. Is it possible to switch not only between solubility properties, but also between reactivities? How can heat exchange be controlled in reactive systems without using solvents? Can we use fluids that stabilize nanoparticles for the control of their reactivity just as we use ligands to control single site catalysts? If we find such seemingly elegant solutions, will they really improve the sustainability of industrial process chains upon implementation? We are far from giving satisfactory answers to these and many more very fundamental questions!

Solution phase synthesis is dominating the fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals industry, and resource and energy efficient production is increasingly making a difference in the business models of these sectors. Material synthesis and processing is also highly depending on the liquid phase. Utilization of biomass requires solution phase processes even in the very early stages of the supply chain, in large scale bio-refineries just as well as for decentralized operations. Chemical transformations lie also at the intersection of the energetic and chemical supply chain. In all these crucial areas of application, novel concepts and materials for solution phase processes can make a difference!

Therefore, I am already today looking forward to the next edition of the “Green Solvents” conference: it will be held in Dresden, Germany, from October 19–22 2014 (for details, see: http://www.dechema.de/gsfs2014). If you enjoy reading the articles in this issue, if you share the enthusiasm for the exciting scientific challenges in this area, or if you see potential connections to your own research, you don’t want to miss this event!

Professor Walter Leitner – Chair of the Green Chemistry Editorial Board

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Green Chemistry 15 years on…

In January 1999 the first issue of Green Chemistry was published with an Editorial written by James Clark, setting out his vision for the Journal.

GC 1999 Issue 1 Cover jpg

1999: First cover of Green Chemistry

Green Chemistry, 2013, Vol. 15, issue 1 front cover

GC, Vol. 15, issue 1 front cover

To mark the occasion of the Journal entering it’s fifteenth year of publication in 2013 we will be having a number of interesting articles asking those scientists who have contributed to the Journal strategy to reflect on how the subject has changed over the last 15 years and asking them for their vision on the subject in the future. 

We will also be highlighting those papers that have been most cited over the years – the papers that you as readers have been citing the most. 

Details about all of these activities will be posted on the Green Chemistry blog throughout 2013.

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