Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Sleeping sickness fly trap in a nutshell – GC article in Chemistry World

Written by Charlie Quigg

An international team of chemists has developed a green method for creating odour attractants to trap the insects that spread African sleeping sickness.

Sleeping sickness or African trypanosomiasis is transmitted by tsetse flies and is a threat to millions of people, and their livestock, across sub-Saharan Africa. Trapping these flies can reduce the number of sleeping sickness cases. Unfortunately, the odour attractants that draw the flies in are often prohibitively expensive – barring buffalo urine, which has unfortunate hygienic and olfactory detractions – limiting their use…

Tsetse flies feed on the blood of vertebrate animals © Image Quest Marine/Alamy

Interested to know more?

Read the full article by Charlie Quigg here

Read the research article in GC:

Synthesis of tsetse fly attractants from a cashew nut shell extract by isomerising metathesis

S. Baader, P.E. Podsiadly, D.J. Cole Hamilton and L.J. Goossen

Green Chem., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4GC01269K

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Driving towards success with biomass-derived petrol – GC article in Chemistry World

Chinese scientists have overcome previous limitations to generate high octane number petrol from biomass-derived γ-valerolactone (GVL), an organic compound that is already often blended in small amounts with petrol or diesel. Using an ionic liquid catalyst, the conversion churned out a 2,2,4-trimethylpentane-rich substance with an octane number of 95.4, the highest reported for biomass derived fuel.

GA

Process for converting GVL into high octane number petrol

Petrol, the liquid many of us use to run our cars, is typically obtained from fossil fuels. But, with energy demands rocketing, producing a renewable and sustainable alternative has become a challenge for many researchers…

Interested to know more?

Read the full article by Anisha Ratan in Chemistry World here…

Read the article in GC:

Conversion of biomass derived valerolactone into high octane number gasoline with an ionic liquid
Jiayu Xin, Dongxia Yan, Olubunmi Ayodele, Zhan Zhang, Xingmei Lu and Suojiang Zhang
Green Chem., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4GC01792G

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EPA Announces Winners of 2014 Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards

Green Chemistry would like to congratulate the recent winners of the EPA Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards. The Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards promote the environmental and economic benefits of developing and using novel green chemistry. These prestigious annual awards recognize chemical technologies that incorporate the principles of green chemistry into chemical design, manufacture, and use. The 2014 submissions were formally judged by an independent panel of technical experts convened by the American Chemical Society Green Chemistry Institute.

The winners include:

  • Academic: Professor Shannon S. Stahl, University of Madison for his work on developing aerobic oxidation methods for Pharmaceutical Synthesis.
  • Small Business: Amyris, for engineering a yeast to make a renewable fuel replacement for petroleum diesel.
  • Designing Greener Chemicals: The Solberg Company, for developing a new safer firefighting foam which is free from persistent toxic chemicals.
  • Greener Reaction Conditions: QD Vision, Inc., for the production of new LED lighting material that can bring massive energy savings.
  • Greener Synthetic Pathways: Solazyme, Inc., for making soaps, laundry detergents, food products and fuels while reducing energy and water use, waste and impacts on forests.

For further information on the award winning research and how to enter for the 2015 awards take a look at the EPA website.

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Waste office paper comes to a sticky end

Paper cannot be recycled into new paper indefinitely

A process for generating aluminium–aluminium bonding adhesives from waste office paper could give a purpose to paper than can no longer be recycled into more paper. 

Paper can typically only be recycled as a new paper product 3–4 times, after this the fibres become too short to be used in new paper or cardboard. Finding alternative ways of reusing this readily available resource is crucial.

To read the full article please visit Chemistry World.

Low-temperature microwave-assisted pyrolysis of waste office paper and the application of bio-oil as an Al adhesive
Zhanrong Zhang, Duncan J. Macquarrie, Mario De bruyn, Vitaliy L. Budarin, Andrew J. Hunt, Mark J. Gronnow, Jiajun Fan, Peter S. Shuttleworth, James H. Clark and Avtar S. Matharu 
Green Chem., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4GC00768A, Paper

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Flue gas reclaimed as polymer feedstock

The first systematic environmental assessment of an industrial plant that produces polyols from carbon dioxide has revealed that they significantly reduce both carbon dioxide emissions and the demand on fossil fuel reserves.

Polyols are the major component of polyurethanes, which make up foams or thermoplastic urethanes in a wide range of applications from mattresses to ski boots. Most polymers are made from fossil fuel-based feedstocks.

To read more on this article please visit Chemistry World.

Life cycle assessment of polyols for polyurethane production using CO2 as feedstock: insights from an industrial case study
Niklas von der Assen and André Bardow 
Green Chem., 2014,16, 3272-3280
DOI: 10.1039/C4GC00513A

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Freeze-dried cells make better biocatalysts

A biocatalytic cascade using mashed-up cells has overcome extraction and solubility problems associated with using enzymes in chemical syntheses.

Enzymes are excellent catalysts for making chiral molecules. One-pot reactions under mild conditions are often possible with more than one catalyst, allowing multi-step syntheses in one go. But if enzymes are used as catalysts, they have to be extracted and purified, and expensive co-factors often need to be added. There are also solubility issues: enzymes are usually most active in buffers, but many of their substrates are hydrophobic, limiting the productivity of the biotransformation because the substrate won’t dissolve in aqueous buffers.

It is thought that the cell envelope helps to stabilise the enzymes in organic solvent

 To read more on this article please visit Chemistry World.

A two-step biocatalytic cascade in micro-aqueous medium: using whole cells to obtain high concentrations of a vicinal diol
Andre Jakoblinnerta and Dörte Rother 
Green Chem., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4GC00010B

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European Sustainable Chemistry Award (ESCA) – Deadline for nominations 1st March 2014

The European Sustainable Chemistry Award (ESCA), launched by The European Association for Chemical and Molecular Sciences (EuCheMS) in 2010, is open for nomintions. The award, a prize of €10,000, will be presented during the 5th EuCheMS Chemistry Congress, 31 August – 4 September 2014 in Istanbul, Turkey. Green Chemistry is very pleased to be sponsoring this award.

The award is designed to:

- Recognise individuals or small research groups which make an outstanding contribution to sustainable development by applying green and sustainable chemistry.

- Promote innovation in chemistry and chemicals that will deliver clear improvements in the sustainable production and use of chemicals and chemical products.

- Demonstrate that chemistry and chemicals can play a central role in delivering society’s needs, while minimizing and solving environmental problems.

The Award is open to individuals or teams of up to three persons. The deadline for nominations is 1st March 2014! To find out more, or to nominate a colleague or team, please visit the website.

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Editorial celebrating 15 years of Green Chemistry

James Clark (Scientific Editor, 199-2003)

James Clark, Scientific Editor, 1999-2003

The first issue of Green Chemistry was published in January 1999; as 2013 comes to a close we are celebrating the completion of 15 years of publication. Over these 15 years articles published in the Journal have recorded the evolving priorities in green chemistry research.

To mark this significant milestone we invited past Chairs of the Editorial Board and Scientific Editors for their views on the area of green chemistry, and the changes they have seen since the Journal was launched.

The result is a wonderfully thought-provoking Editorial which is published in 2014 Issue 1 and we hope you enjoy reading.

Read the Editorial celebrating 15 years of Green Chemistry online for free here.

Walter Leitner (Scientific Editor 2004-2012 and Editorial Board Chair 2012-Present)

Walter Leitner, Scientific Editor 2004-2012 and Editorial Board Chair 2012-Present

Roger Sheldon (Editorial Board Chair 1999-2001)

Roger Sheldon, Editorial Board Chair 1999-2001

Colin Raston (Editorial Board Chair 2002-2005)

Colin Raston, Editorial Board Chair 2002-2005

Martyn Poliakoff (Editorial Board Chair 2006-2011)

Martyn Poliakoff, Editorial Board Chair 2006-2011


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Sustainable Chemicals from Microalgae: Encompassing Biocrude through to Fine Chemicals

The Sustainable Chemicals from Microalgae one day conference will take place on the 19th November 2013 at the Chemistry Centre, Piccadilly, London. The conference will bring together researchers from academia and industry at all levels interested in developing microalgae in industrial biotechnology. This highly interdisciplinary symposium is co-sponsored by the BBSRC  (Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council), a major funder of biotechnology-related research within the UK.

The programme of this meeting will feature both oral, flash poster and conventional poster presentations. Please follow the links to register to attend – registration fee £35: http://rsc.li/microalgae-2013

The list of speakers includes:

Professor Wim Brilman, Sustainable Process Technology, University of Twente, The Netherlands
Professor Mike Burkart, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, USA
Professor Chris Dupont, Microbial and Environmental Genomics Group, J. Craig Venter Institute, San Diego, USA
Dr Juan Nogales Enrique, Centre de Investigaciones Biologicas (CSIC), Madrid, Spain
Professor Rene H Wijffels, Bioprocess Engineering, Wageningen University, The Netherlands
Mr Steve Skill, Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Professor Alison Smith, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, UK
Professor Rod Scott, Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Bath, UK
Professor John Love, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, UK
Dr Michelle Stanley, The Scottish Association of Marine Science, UK
Dr Saul Purton, Institute of Structural and Molecular Biology, University College London, UK

For more details about this exciting conference and to register, please visit the website!

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Top 10 most-accessed articles April–June 2013

The 10 most-accessed Green Chemistry articles between April and June 2013 were as follows:

Vegetables as biocatalysts in stereoselective hydrolysis of labile organic compounds
Björn Bohman, L. R. Cavonius and C. Rikard Unelius 
Green Chem., 2009, 11, 1900-1905
DOI: 10.1039/B913936B, Paper

Hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose by solid acid catalysts
Yao-Bing Huang and Yao Fu 
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 1095-1111
DOI: 10.1039/C3GC40136G, Tutorial Review

Deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass with ionic liquids
Agnieszka Brandt, John Gräsvik, Jason P. Hallett and Tom Welton 
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 550-583
DOI: 10.1039/C2GC36364J, Critical Review

FeIII–TAML-catalyzed green oxidative degradation of the azo dye Orange II by H2O2 and organic peroxides: products, toxicity, kinetics, and mechanisms
Naima Chahbane, Delia-Laura Popescu, Douglas A. Mitchell, Arani Chanda, Dieter Lenoir, Alexander D. Ryabov, Karl-Werner Schramm and Terrence J. Collins 
Green Chem., 2007, 9, 49-57
DOI: 10.1039/B604990G, Paper

The role of flow in green chemistry and engineering
Stephen G. Newman and Klavs F. Jensen 
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 1456-1472
DOI: 10.1039/C3GC40374B, Critical Review

Characterization and comparison of hydrophilic and hydrophobic room temperature ionic liquids incorporating the imidazolium cation
Jonathan G. Huddleston, Ann E. Visser, W. Matthew Reichert, Heather D. Willauer, Grant A. Broker and Robin D. Rogers 
Green Chem., 2001, 3, 156-164
DOI: 10.1039/B103275P, Paper

Copper on chitosan: a recyclable heterogeneous catalyst for azide–alkyne cycloaddition reactions in water
R. B. Nasir Baig and Rajender S. Varma 
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 1839-1843
DOI: 10.1039/C3GC40401C, Communication

A general and practical oxidation of alcohols to primary amides under metal-free conditions
Xiao-Feng Wu, Muhammad Sharif, Jian-Bo Feng, Helfried Neumann, Anahit Pews-Davtyan, Peter Langer and Matthias Beller 
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 1956-1961
DOI: 10.1039/C3GC40668G, Paper

Development of GSK’s reagent guides – embedding sustainability into reagent selection
Joseph P. Adams, Catherine M. Alder, Ian Andrews, Ann M. Bullion, Matthew Campbell-Crawford, Michael G. Darcy, John D. Hayler, Richard K. Henderson, Catriona A. Oare, Israil Pendrak, Anikó M. Redman, Leanna E. Shuster, Helen F. Sneddon and Matthew D. Walker 
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 1542-1549
DOI: 10.1039/C3GC40225H, Paper

Catalytic conversion of biomass to biofuels
David Martin Alonso, Jesse Q. Bond and James A. Dumesic 
Green Chem., 2010, 12, 1493-1513
DOI: 10.1039/C004654J, Critical Review

Take a look at the articles and then let us know your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting your own work to Green Chemistry? You can submit online today, or email us with your ideas and suggestions.

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