Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Flue gas reclaimed as polymer feedstock

The first systematic environmental assessment of an industrial plant that produces polyols from carbon dioxide has revealed that they significantly reduce both carbon dioxide emissions and the demand on fossil fuel reserves.

Polyols are the major component of polyurethanes, which make up foams or thermoplastic urethanes in a wide range of applications from mattresses to ski boots. Most polymers are made from fossil fuel-based feedstocks.

To read more on this article please visit Chemistry World.

Life cycle assessment of polyols for polyurethane production using CO2 as feedstock: insights from an industrial case study
Niklas von der Assen and André Bardow  
Green Chem., 2014,16, 3272-3280
DOI: 10.1039/C4GC00513A

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Freeze-dried cells make better biocatalysts

A biocatalytic cascade using mashed-up cells has overcome extraction and solubility problems associated with using enzymes in chemical syntheses.

Enzymes are excellent catalysts for making chiral molecules. One-pot reactions under mild conditions are often possible with more than one catalyst, allowing multi-step syntheses in one go. But if enzymes are used as catalysts, they have to be extracted and purified, and expensive co-factors often need to be added. There are also solubility issues: enzymes are usually most active in buffers, but many of their substrates are hydrophobic, limiting the productivity of the biotransformation because the substrate won’t dissolve in aqueous buffers.

It is thought that the cell envelope helps to stabilise the enzymes in organic solvent

 To read more on this article please visit Chemistry World.

A two-step biocatalytic cascade in micro-aqueous medium: using whole cells to obtain high concentrations of a vicinal diol
Andre Jakoblinnerta and Dörte Rother  
Green Chem., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4GC00010B

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European Sustainable Chemistry Award (ESCA) – Deadline for nominations 1st March 2014

The European Sustainable Chemistry Award (ESCA), launched by The European Association for Chemical and Molecular Sciences (EuCheMS) in 2010, is open for nomintions. The award, a prize of €10,000, will be presented during the 5th EuCheMS Chemistry Congress, 31 August – 4 September 2014 in Istanbul, Turkey. Green Chemistry is very pleased to be sponsoring this award.

The award is designed to:

- Recognise individuals or small research groups which make an outstanding contribution to sustainable development by applying green and sustainable chemistry.

- Promote innovation in chemistry and chemicals that will deliver clear improvements in the sustainable production and use of chemicals and chemical products.

- Demonstrate that chemistry and chemicals can play a central role in delivering society’s needs, while minimizing and solving environmental problems.

The Award is open to individuals or teams of up to three persons. The deadline for nominations is 1st March 2014! To find out more, or to nominate a colleague or team, please visit the website.

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Editorial celebrating 15 years of Green Chemistry

James Clark (Scientific Editor, 199-2003)

James Clark, Scientific Editor, 1999-2003

The first issue of Green Chemistry was published in January 1999; as 2013 comes to a close we are celebrating the completion of 15 years of publication. Over these 15 years articles published in the Journal have recorded the evolving priorities in green chemistry research.

To mark this significant milestone we invited past Chairs of the Editorial Board and Scientific Editors for their views on the area of green chemistry, and the changes they have seen since the Journal was launched.

The result is a wonderfully thought-provoking Editorial which is published in 2014 Issue 1 and we hope you enjoy reading.

Read the Editorial celebrating 15 years of Green Chemistry online for free here.

Walter Leitner (Scientific Editor 2004-2012 and Editorial Board Chair 2012-Present)

Walter Leitner, Scientific Editor 2004-2012 and Editorial Board Chair 2012-Present

Roger Sheldon (Editorial Board Chair 1999-2001)

Roger Sheldon, Editorial Board Chair 1999-2001

Colin Raston (Editorial Board Chair 2002-2005)

Colin Raston, Editorial Board Chair 2002-2005

Martyn Poliakoff (Editorial Board Chair 2006-2011)

Martyn Poliakoff, Editorial Board Chair 2006-2011


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Sustainable Chemicals from Microalgae: Encompassing Biocrude through to Fine Chemicals

The Sustainable Chemicals from Microalgae one day conference will take place on the 19th November 2013 at the Chemistry Centre, Piccadilly, London. The conference will bring together researchers from academia and industry at all levels interested in developing microalgae in industrial biotechnology. This highly interdisciplinary symposium is co-sponsored by the BBSRC  (Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council), a major funder of biotechnology-related research within the UK.

The programme of this meeting will feature both oral, flash poster and conventional poster presentations. Please follow the links to register to attend – registration fee £35: http://rsc.li/microalgae-2013

The list of speakers includes:

Professor Wim Brilman, Sustainable Process Technology, University of Twente, The Netherlands
Professor Mike Burkart, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, USA
Professor Chris Dupont, Microbial and Environmental Genomics Group, J. Craig Venter Institute, San Diego, USA
Dr Juan Nogales Enrique, Centre de Investigaciones Biologicas (CSIC), Madrid, Spain
Professor Rene H Wijffels, Bioprocess Engineering, Wageningen University, The Netherlands
Mr Steve Skill, Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Professor Alison Smith, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, UK
Professor Rod Scott, Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Bath, UK
Professor John Love, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, UK
Dr Michelle Stanley, The Scottish Association of Marine Science, UK
Dr Saul Purton, Institute of Structural and Molecular Biology, University College London, UK

For more details about this exciting conference and to register, please visit the website!

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Top 10 most-accessed articles April–June 2013

The 10 most-accessed Green Chemistry articles between April and June 2013 were as follows:

Vegetables as biocatalysts in stereoselective hydrolysis of labile organic compounds
Björn Bohman, L. R. Cavonius and C. Rikard Unelius  
Green Chem., 2009, 11, 1900-1905
DOI: 10.1039/B913936B, Paper

Hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose by solid acid catalysts
Yao-Bing Huang and Yao Fu  
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 1095-1111
DOI: 10.1039/C3GC40136G, Tutorial Review

Deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass with ionic liquids
Agnieszka Brandt, John Gräsvik, Jason P. Hallett and Tom Welton  
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 550-583
DOI: 10.1039/C2GC36364J, Critical Review

FeIII–TAML-catalyzed green oxidative degradation of the azo dye Orange II by H2O2 and organic peroxides: products, toxicity, kinetics, and mechanisms
Naima Chahbane, Delia-Laura Popescu, Douglas A. Mitchell, Arani Chanda, Dieter Lenoir, Alexander D. Ryabov, Karl-Werner Schramm and Terrence J. Collins  
Green Chem., 2007, 9, 49-57
DOI: 10.1039/B604990G, Paper

The role of flow in green chemistry and engineering
Stephen G. Newman and Klavs F. Jensen  
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 1456-1472
DOI: 10.1039/C3GC40374B, Critical Review

Characterization and comparison of hydrophilic and hydrophobic room temperature ionic liquids incorporating the imidazolium cation
Jonathan G. Huddleston, Ann E. Visser, W. Matthew Reichert, Heather D. Willauer, Grant A. Broker and Robin D. Rogers  
Green Chem., 2001, 3, 156-164
DOI: 10.1039/B103275P, Paper

Copper on chitosan: a recyclable heterogeneous catalyst for azide–alkyne cycloaddition reactions in water
R. B. Nasir Baig and Rajender S. Varma  
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 1839-1843
DOI: 10.1039/C3GC40401C, Communication

A general and practical oxidation of alcohols to primary amides under metal-free conditions
Xiao-Feng Wu, Muhammad Sharif, Jian-Bo Feng, Helfried Neumann, Anahit Pews-Davtyan, Peter Langer and Matthias Beller  
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 1956-1961
DOI: 10.1039/C3GC40668G, Paper

Development of GSK’s reagent guides – embedding sustainability into reagent selection
Joseph P. Adams, Catherine M. Alder, Ian Andrews, Ann M. Bullion, Matthew Campbell-Crawford, Michael G. Darcy, John D. Hayler, Richard K. Henderson, Catriona A. Oare, Israil Pendrak, Anikó M. Redman, Leanna E. Shuster, Helen F. Sneddon and Matthew D. Walker  
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 1542-1549
DOI: 10.1039/C3GC40225H, Paper

Catalytic conversion of biomass to biofuels
David Martin Alonso, Jesse Q. Bond and James A. Dumesic  
Green Chem., 2010, 12, 1493-1513
DOI: 10.1039/C004654J, Critical Review

Take a look at the articles and then let us know your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting your own work to Green Chemistry? You can submit online today, or email us with your ideas and suggestions.

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Top 10 most-accessed articles March 2013

The 10 most-accessed articles in Green Chemistry for March 2013 were as follows:

Deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass with ionic liquids
Agnieszka Brandt, John Gräsvik, Jason P. Hallett and Tom Welton  
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 550-583
DOI: 10.1039/C2GC36364J, Critical Review

Gamma-valerolactone, a sustainable platform molecule derived from lignocellulosic biomass
David Martin Alonso, Stephanie G. Wettstein and James A. Dumesic  
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 584-595
DOI: 10.1039/C3GC37065H, Critical Review
From themed collection Green Chemistry and the Environment

Catalytic applications of a versatile magnetically separable Fe–Mo (Nanocat-Fe–Mo) nanocatalyst
Manoj B. Gawande, Paula S. Branco, Isabel D. Nogueira, C. Amjad A. Ghumman, Nenad Bundaleski, Adérito Santos, Orlando M. N. D. Teodoro and Rafael Luque  
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 682-689
DOI: 10.1039/C3GC36844K, Paper

Green chemistry and the ocean-based biorefinery
Francesca M. Kerton, Yi Liu, Khaled W. Omari and Kelly Hawboldt  
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 860-871
DOI: 10.1039/C3GC36994C, Perspective

Chemodivergent, multicomponent domino reactions in aqueous media: L-proline-catalyzed assembly of densely functionalized 4H-pyrano[2,3-c]pyrazoles and bispyrazolyl propanoates from simple, acyclic starting materials
Pitchaimani Prasanna, Subbu Perumal and J. Carlos Menéndez  
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 1292-1299
DOI: 10.1039/C3GC37128J, Paper

Aqueous oxidation of alcohols catalysed by recoverable iron oxide nanoparticles supported on aluminosilicates
Fatemeh Rajabi, Antonio Pineda, Sareh Naserian, Alina Mariana Balu, Rafael Luque and Antonio A. Romero  
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 1232-1237
DOI: 10.1039/C3GC40110C, Paper

Reduction of aromatic and aliphatic nitro groups to anilines and amines with hypophosphites associated with Pd/C
Marc Baron, Estelle Métay, Marc Lemaire and Florence Popowycz  
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 1006-1015
DOI: 10.1039/C3GC37024K, Paper

Reduction of sulfoxides and pyridine-N-oxides over iron powder with water as hydrogen source promoted by carbon dioxide
Ran Ma, An-Hua Liu, Cheng-Bin Huang, Xue-Dong Li and Liang-Nian He  
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 1274-1279
DOI: 10.1039/C3GC40243F, Paper

Efficient three-component coupling catalysed by mesoporous copper–aluminum based nanocomposites
Jana Dulle, K. Thirunavukkarasu, Marjo C. Mittelmeijer-Hazeleger, Daria V. Andreeva, N. Raveendran Shiju and Gadi Rothenberg  
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 1238-1243
DOI: 10.1039/C3GC36607C, Paper

Removal of transition metals from rare earths by solvent extraction with an undiluted phosphonium ionic liquid: separations relevant to rare-earth magnet recycling
Tom Vander Hoogerstraete, Sil Wellens, Katrien Verachtert and Koen Binnemans  
Green Chem., 2013, 15, 919-927
DOI: 10.1039/C3GC40198G, Paper

Take a look at the articles, and then let us know your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting your own work to Green Chemistry? You can submit online today, or email us with your ideas and suggestions.

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Green Chemistry impact factor reaches another record high of 6.8

We are delighted to announce that Green Chemistry’s Impact Factor* has risen to a new high of 6.8!

Walter Leitner, Chair of the Green Chemistry Editorial Board said of the news: “Once again, the impact factor for Green Chemistry has seen a significant increase, reaching an all-time high of 6.8. This is due to the excellent research of the community and the dedication of the authors to share their exciting results, the enormous efforts by the referees to ensure the highest quality, the distinguished profile of the journal and the tremendous and exceptionally professional job of the management office! Taking the impact factor as tool (not the goal) for a journal to measure the reception of its content by the community, I think we can all be proud of this development.”

We would like to thank all our authors, referees, readers and Editorial and Advisory Board  members for their help and support on the Journal.

Green Chemistry was launched 15 years ago and ever since has led the way publishing cutting edge research on the development of alternative sustainable technologies. We invite you to submit your latest research on sustainable chemistry and technology to Green Chemistry. 

Keep up-to-date with the latest content in Green Chemistry by registering for our free table of contents alerts. 

Read more about the 2012 Impact Factors on the RSC Publishing Blog.

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. Data based on 2012 Journal Citation Reports®, (Thomson Reuters, 2013).

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Green Chemistry issue 5 now available online!

Issue 5 of Green Chemistry is now available to read online.

The front cover (left) this month features work by Etienne Grau and Stefan Mecking from Konstanz, Germany. In their work, caryophyllene and humulene, renewable sesquiterpenes from clove oil, were subject to metathesis polymerization to yield non-crosslinked linear polymers with unique microstructures and low glass transition temperatures.

Read the research: Polyterpenes by ring opening metathesis polymerization of caryophyllene and humulene, E. Grau and S. Mecking, Green Chem., 2013, 15, 1112–1115, DOI: c3gc40300a

The inside front cover (right) this month features work by Thomas-Xavier Métro, Frédéric Lamaty and co-workers from Montpellier, France. Their paper describes an original liquid-assisted ball-milling methodology for peptide bond synthesis – avoiding toxic solvents and reactants – and its application to the synthesis of Leu-enkephalin.

Read the research: Environmentally benign peptide synthesis using liquid-assisted ball-milling: application to the synthesis of Leu-enkephalin, J. Bonnamour, T.-X. Métro, J. Martinez and F. Lamaty, Green Chem., 2013, 15, 1116–1120, DOI: c3gc40302e

Both of these articles are free to access for 6 weeks!

Keep up-to-date with the latest content in Green Chemistry by registering for our free table of contents alerts.

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Recycling rare earth elements using ionic liquids

Recycling old magnets, so that rare-earth metals can be re-used, could help to solve an urgent raw material supply problem in the electronics industry. Researchers from the University of Leuven, Belgium, have used ionic liquids to separate neodymium and samarium from transition metals like iron, manganese and cobalt – all elements that are used in the construction of permanent rare-earth magnets, which are found in electronic devices ranging from hard drives to air conditioners and wind turbines.

‘The process involves the liquid-liquid extraction of rare-earth metals from the other elements present in neodymium-iron-boron and samarium-cobalt magnets,’ explains Koen Binnemans who leads the group developing the process. ‘These other elements – including iron, cobalt, manganese, copper and zinc – are extracted into the ionic-liquid phase, while the rare-earth metals are left behind in the aqueous phase,’ he says, adding that the ionic liquid itself – trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium chloride – can also be re-used, after the transition metals have been stripped out.

In traditional liquid-liquid extractions of metal ions, an aqueous phase containing the metal salt is mixed with an organic phase containing an extraction agent. Simple though they are, these processes use organic phases comprising flammable and volatile solvents, like toluene, kerosene or diethyl ether. Ionic liquids are far more environmentally friendly, having very low vapour pressure and non-flammability.

Read the full article in Chemistry World

Read the original journal article in Green Chemistry:

Removal of transition metals from rare earths by solvent extraction with an undiluted phosphonium ionic liquid: separations relevant to rare-earth magnet recycling
Tom Vander Hoogerstraete,  Sil Wellens,  Katrien Verachtert and Koen Binnemans
Green Chem., 2013,15, 919-927

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