Archive for the ‘News’ Category

What are the greatest needs in green chemistry?

Applied research in the area of green chemistry can be most effective if it is directed at solving problems that cause significant environmental impact or inefficiencies in current human activities. It is therefore necessary to identify those problems.

Green Chemistry is planning a virtual special issue on the topic of the greatest needs for green chemistry research, in the hope that this information will be of service to the community. The issue will encompass Perspectives papers that identify the top green needs in any one area.

We are therefore appealing for your thoughts on what are the most pressing needs for green chemistry research:

  • What fields of research should be topics of such papers? (could be a field of economic activity, a field of research, a kind of impact, or a class of chemicals/processes/products)
  • Who would you recommend as the author(s) for the papers you’ve suggested above?

We welcome self-nominations and proposals for Perspectives which fall into this topic. Please note that all papers will be subject to the usual initial assessment and peer review processes.

Fill in the survey online at rsc.li/greenchemneeds by 31 October 2017

You can also contact us at green-rsc@rsc.org

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Green Chemistry New Zealand 2017

Green Chemistry New Zealand 2017 will take place in Auckland, New Zealand between 8 – 9 December 2017. The event will feature contributions covering different aspects of green and sustainable chemical science and technology.

Green Chemistry and Sustainable Energy & Fuels will be contributing prizes for the winning poster presentation abstracts. Green Chemistry Chair Philip Jessop will also be attending the event as a keynote speaker.

Early registration for the event closes on 1 August 2017. Full registration closes on 1 November 2017.

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Green Chemistry’s Impact Factor increases to 9.125

Green Chemistry is delighted to announce its Impact Factor has increased to 9.125*.

Green Chemistry continues to lead the field as the home of cutting-edge science for the development of alternative sustainable technologies and number 1 journal in the ‘Green & Sustainable Science & Technology’ category of the Journal Citation Reports.

The broad scope and interdisciplinary nature of the research published in the journal, coupled with rigorous peer review and rapid times to publication of 49 days** from receipt to acceptance, ensures your work will quickly attract the attention it deserves.

We would like to thank all our authors, readers, reviewers and Editorial & Advisory Board members for making Green Chemistry a unique forum for research that enables a greener sustainable future

Find the all the RSC’s journals newly published 2016 Impact Factors* here.

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year, by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. Data based on 2016 Journal Citation Reports® (Thomson Reuters).

**2016 average

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New Green Chemistry Associate Editor: Alessandra Quadrelli

We are delighted to welcome Dr Elsje Alessandra Quadrelli as our newest Green Chemistry Associate Editor.

Alessandra Quadrelli, CNRS and ESCPE Lyon, France

ORCiD http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8606-1183

Alessandra is the CNRS director of research in the “Surface organometallic chemistry” team of the C2P2 laboratory in Lyon (France). Her research in the C2P2 unit, under triple tutelage CNRS CPE and Université de Lyon 1, focuses on gaining molecular understanding of the interaction between organometallic precursors and solid surfaces, such as silica and more recently, metal organic frameworks and 2D supports, in route to heterogeneous catalysts and functional materials. As chairwoman of the Sustainability Chair of Chemical, Physics and Electronic Engineering School CPE Lyon, she teaches graduate and undergraduate courses an organizes the biyearly international conference “CO2 Forum” on large scale carbon dioxide utilisations”.

As a Green Chemistry Associate Editor, Alessandra will provide her expertise in particular in the fields of:

  • Surface organometallic chemistry
  • Supported catalysis
  • Inorganic oxides
  • MOFs
  • Small molecule activation

Submit your best green chemistry work in these areas to Alessandra now.

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Outstanding Reviewers for Green Chemistry in 2016

Following the success of Peer Review Week in September 2016 (dedicated to reviewer recognition) during which we published a list of our top reviewers, we are delighted to announce that we will continue to recognise the contribution that our reviewers make to the journal by announcing our Outstanding Reviewers each year.

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Green Chemistry in 2016, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Dr Mark A Harmer, DuPont
Professor Toshiyuki Itoh, Tottori University
Professor Rafael Luque, Universidad de Cordoba
Professor Yoshinao Nakagawa, Tohoku University
Dr Jinliang Song, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences

We would also like to thank the Green Chemistry board and the Green Chemistry community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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Top 10 Reviewers for Green Chemistry

In celebration of Peer Review Week, with the theme of Recognition for Review – we would like to highlight the top 10 reviewers for Green Chemistry in 2016. They have been selected by the editor for their significant contribution to the journal.

Top 10 reviewers for Green Chemistry
Dr Feng Lu, University of Utah
Dr Yasuyuki Kita, Ritsumeikan University
Dr Jean Jacques Vanden Eynde, University of Mons-UMONS
Dr Nicholas E. Leadbeater, University of Connecticut
Dr Mark A. Harmer, SAC Tech Innovations
Dr Francois Jerome, Universite de Poitiers
Dr Zhijie Wu, China University of Petroleum
Professor Robin D. Rogers, McGill University
Dr Alistair King, University of Helsinki
Professor Luigi Vaccaro, Universita di Perugia

We would like to say a massive thank you to these reviewers as well as the Green Chemistry board and all of the community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

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Advisory board member Professor Sir Martyn Poliakoff wins Lord Lewis Prize

A picture of Martyn PoliakoffMartyn Poliakoff is well-known both for his academic work and for his incredibly popular series of Periodic Videos. His research bridges the interface of chemistry and engineering, making chemical processes more environmentally friendly, by replacing the solvents used in reactions with greener alternatives. This work will provide society with more sustainable ways to produce the chemicals that we need. His major contribution has been in the use of supercritical fluids (gases compressed until they are as dense as liquids), particularly supercritical carbon dioxide or steam, as solvents for chemical reactions involving hydrogen or oxygen with organic compounds. The Lord Lewis Prize, which is awarded every two years, is given for distinctive and distinguished chemical or scientific achievements, together with significant contributions to the development of science policy.

To read more about Professor Sir Martyn Poliakoff and the 2016 Lord Lewis Prize please click-through to the website.

Related content:
All 2016 Royal Society of Chemistry prize and award winners: http://rsc.li/awards-prizes-2016
Collection of articles published by prize and award winners: http://rsc.li/rscwinners2016-collection

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Editorial board member Paul Anastas wins prestigious Green Chemistry award

A picture of Paul AnastasProfessor Anastas is widely regarded as the ‘father of green chemistry’ and holds the Teresa and H. John Heinz III Chair in Chemistry for the Environment at Yale University. His talents have brought him to positions in service of four U.S. Presidents including working in the White House in the Clinton and Bush Administration and was named by President Obama to the Senate-confirmed position as Assistant Administrator for Research and Development at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In 2007, he founded the Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering at Yale that is engaged in basic research, development, commercialization, curriculum development, and policy initiatives.

To read more about Professor Anastas and the 2016 Green Chemistry Award please click-through to the website.

Related content:
All 2016 Royal Society of Chemistry prize and award winners: http://rsc.li/awards-prizes-2016
Collection of articles published by prize and award winners: http://rsc.li/rscwinners2016-collection

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“Happy Silver Anniversary”: Green Chemistry at 25

2016 is the Silver Anniversary for the field of Green Chemistry being 25 years since the term “Green Chemistry” was coined and defined in 1991. To mark this occasion, the 2016 Issue 1 of Green Chemistry features an Editorial looking at the journey of the field to date and introducing an initiative designed to stimulate discussion on the vision for the field. You can read the Editorial by Paul Anastas, Buxing Han, Walter Leitner and Martyn Poliakoff here.

We have asked colleagues from the Editorial and Advisory Board of Green Chemistry to comment on individual Principles that relate to their specific area of expertise and to share their personal views with our community.

Every month of 2016, Green Chemistry will feature one such perspective Editorial (collated online: rsc.li/gc-25years) hopefully initiating a lively exchange of views and ideas here on the Green Chemistry blog. We encourage you to use the comments facility below to share your views on each principle.

The Editorials are not meant to provide answers, but to stimulate questions on how the Principles have influenced research agendas, how they connect to challenges and opportunities that may not have been visible twenty five years ago, why they are still valid or what needs to be adjusted, etc..

Most importantly, the aim is to not primarily to look back in praise of the undisputable achievements, but to provide a vision towards celebrating the Golden Anniversary of the field in 2041 and beyond.

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A photochemical method for separating rare earth metals

Rare earth metals are notoriously hard to separate from one another, due to the similarity of their chemical properties. At present, the complex series of solvent extraction steps to extract rare earths from their ores are only carried out in China. With their increasing utilisation in modern technologies, scientists have been collaborating to develop cleaner less intensive methods of rare earth separation.

Tom Van Gerven and Koen Binnemans of the University of Leuven in Belgium have worked together to combine their expertise and develop a photochemical method for extracting the europium and yttrium from an ionic liquid solution. Both elements are present in their trivalent state, but if europium absorbs light of the correct wavelength (provided by a low pressure mercury lamp) it will reduce to the divalent state and be precipitated out.

Want to know more?

Read the full article in Chemistry World by Jonathan Midgley.

Or, take a look at the original article which is free to access until 8th July 2015:

Photochemical recycling of europium from Eu/Y mixtures in red lamp phosphor waste streams” by B Van den Bogaert et al., DOI:10.1039/c4gc02140a

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