Archive for the ‘Article collections’ Category

Green Chemistry issue 2 is now available online

Issue 2 of Green Chemistry is a themed issue on the conversion of biomass with heterogeneous catalysts, Guest Edited by Professors Paul Dauenhauer and George Huber. It’s available to read online now.

GC issue 2 coverThe front cover this month (pictured left) features a review by Jesse Hensley and co-workers from Golden, Colorado. In their article they focus on recent model compound studies of catalysts for hydrodeoxygenation of biomass pyrolysis products, with an emphasis on mechanisms, reaction networks, and structure–function relationships.

Read the full article:
Recent advances in heterogeneous catalysts for bio-oil upgrading via “ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis”: catalyst development through the study of model compounds
Daniel A. Ruddy, Joshua A. Schaidle, Jack R. Ferrell III, Jun Wang, Luc Moens and Jesse E. Hensley  
Green Chem., 2014, 16, 454-490, DOI: 10.1039/C3GC41354C


GC issue 2 inside coverThe inside front cover this month (pictured right) features work by Andreas Heyden and co-workers from Columbia, South Carolina. In their work they report a theoretical study of the effects of various solvents on the mechanism of the hydrodeoxygenation of propanoic acid over Pd(111).

Read the full article:
Solvent effects on the hydrodeoxygenation of propanoic acid over Pd(111) model surfaces
Sina Behtash, Jianmin Lu, Muhammad Faheem and Andreas Heyden  
Green Chem., 2014, 16, 605-616, DOI: 10.1039/C3GC41368C

Both of these articles are free to access for 6 weeks!

Keep up-to-date with the latest content in Green Chemistry by registering for our free table of contents alerts.

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Web Collection marking 15 years of publication of Green Chemistry

To mark the occasion of Green Chemistry completing fifteen years of publication we invited contributions from authors who have had highly cited articles from each of the past 15 years. The result is a growing web collection covering topics of current importance in green chemistry from those who have contributed to developing the field. Details of the contributors, their highly cited article from the year they are representing, and their recent contribution are below. 

Accompanying this collection and further celebrating ‘15 years of Green Chemistry’ is an Editorial containing contributions from all of Green Chemistry’s Chairs of the Editorial board and Scientific Editors giving their views on the area of green chemistry and the changes they have seen since the Journal was launched in 1999… read the Editorial here.

The 15 Years of Green Chemistry collection will be added to throughout 2014 and you can access the articles by clicking on the titles below, or look at the full collection of recent articles online here

Year 15 Years of Green Chemistry Contribution Original Highly Cited Article
1999 Journey on greener pathways: from the use of alternate energy inputs and benign reaction media to sustainable applications of nano-catalysts in synthesis and environmental remediation
Rajender S. Varma, 2014, Perspective
Solvent-free organic syntheses. using supported reagents and microwave irradiation, Rajender S. Varma, 1999, Paper
2000 Food waste biomass: a resource for high-value chemicals
Lucie A. Pfaltzgraff, Mario De bruyn, Emma C. Cooper, Vitaly Budarin and  James H. Clark, 2013, Perspective
Preparation of a novel silica-supported palladium catalyst and its use in the Heck reaction
James H. Clark, Duncan J. Macquarrie and Egid B. Mubofu, 2000, Paper
2001 Mixing ionic liquids – “simple mixtures” or “double salts”?
Gregory Chatel, Jorge F. B. Pereira, Varun Debbeti, Hui Wang and Robin D. Rogers, Green Chem., 2014, Critical Review
Characterization and comparison of hydrophilic and hydrophobic room temperature ionic liquids incorporating the imidazolium cation, Jonathan G. Huddleston, Ann E. Visser, W. Matthew Reichert, Heather D. Willauer, Grant A. Broker and Robin D. Rogers, 2001, paper
2005 Green and sustainable manufacture of chemicals from biomass: state of the art
Roger A. Sheldon, 2014, Critical Review
Green solvents for sustainable organic synthesis: state of the art
Roger A. Sheldon, 2005, Critical Review
2008 Towards resource efficient chemistry: Tandem reactions with renewables
Arno Behr, Andreas Johannes Vorholt, Thomas Seidensticker and Karoline Anna Ostrowski, 2013, Critical Review
Improved utilisation of renewable resources: New important derivatives of glycerol
Arno Behr, Jens Eilting, Ken Irawadi, Julia Leschinski and Falk Lindner, 2008, Critical Review
2009 Conversion of glucose and cellulose into value-added products in water and ionic liquids
Jinliang Song, Honglei Fan, Jun Ma and Buxing, 2013, Tutorial Review
Efficient conversion of glucose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural catalyzed by a common Lewis acid SnCl4 in an ionic liquid
Suqin Hu, Zhaofu Zhang, Jinliang Song, Yinxi Zhou and Buxing Han, 2009, Communication
2011 Conversion of biomass platform molecules into fuel additives and liquid hydrocarbon fuels
Maria J. Climent, Avelino Corma and Sara Iborra, 2014, Critical Review
Converting carbohydrates to bulk chemicals and fine chemicals over heterogeneous catalysts
Maria J. Climent, Avelino Corma and Sara Iborra, 2011, Critical Review
2012 Continuous process technology: a tool for sustainable production
Charlotte Wiles and Paul Watts, 2014, Tutorial Review
Continuous flow reactors: a perspective
Charlotte Wiles and Paul Watts, 2012, Tutorial Review
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Green Solvents – Mission Completed or Mission Impossible?

The search for alternatives to volatile organic solvents is one of the continuing major themes in Green Chemistry. “Solvents” are explicitly mentioned in principle 5 of the 12 Green Chemistry Principles, but their use impacts of course also directly on issues such as waste prevention, energy efficiency, and safety. The search for alternative materials and concepts to facilitate solution phase processes towards the goals of sustainability forms a natural link between Green Chemistry and Engineering. Since the year 2000, the biennial conference “Green Solvents” brings together researchers from academia and industry, as well as students, to discuss the progress in science and application in this area. As in previous years, the presenters at the 2012 edition of the conference have been invited to contribute a review or original research paper to the journal and you will find the resulting articles bundled in this issue.

The organization of six editions of this meeting together with Peter Wasserscheid and Ken Seddon has been scientifically most rewarding and personally a real pleasure. The concept to organize the program without parallel sessions, arranging it according to the scientific and technical challenges rather than the materials or methods has led to most fruitful interactions and stimulating discussions. One of the most striking developments reflected across the board is that the advanced fluids such as ionic liquids, supercritical fluids, water, or liquid polymers are often not adequately described as “solvents” when used for molecular transformations or separation techniques. They act as additives, stabilizers, matrices, switchable components, catalysts, etc. Unlike with traditional solvents, only very small amounts of the fluids are often required, for example to combine reactivity and separation in catalyst immobilization. Smart systems change their properties upon external stimuli or directly interact with reactive components to steer a reaction. Reaction engineering concepts for flow chemistry open new approaches with these materials and vice versa. So, are we at the stage “Mission Completed”?

Actually – I don’t really think so: striving for sustainability is an iterative process and if we are doing well, we can always do better! Immobilizing a catalyst today, we are already satisfied if it retains largely its activity and selectivity from solution; very often, we find that the supporting matrix interacts with the catalyst leading to a reduced performance. There is no reason why the interaction should not lead to an activation or increase in selectivity! In fact, there are a – still slowly – increasing number of observations that support this idea. Is it possible to switch not only between solubility properties, but also between reactivities? How can heat exchange be controlled in reactive systems without using solvents? Can we use fluids that stabilize nanoparticles for the control of their reactivity just as we use ligands to control single site catalysts? If we find such seemingly elegant solutions, will they really improve the sustainability of industrial process chains upon implementation? We are far from giving satisfactory answers to these and many more very fundamental questions!

Solution phase synthesis is dominating the fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals industry, and resource and energy efficient production is increasingly making a difference in the business models of these sectors. Material synthesis and processing is also highly depending on the liquid phase. Utilization of biomass requires solution phase processes even in the very early stages of the supply chain, in large scale bio-refineries just as well as for decentralized operations. Chemical transformations lie also at the intersection of the energetic and chemical supply chain. In all these crucial areas of application, novel concepts and materials for solution phase processes can make a difference!

Therefore, I am already today looking forward to the next edition of the “Green Solvents” conference: it will be held in Dresden, Germany, from October 19–22 2014 (for details, see: http://www.dechema.de/gsfs2014). If you enjoy reading the articles in this issue, if you share the enthusiasm for the exciting scientific challenges in this area, or if you see potential connections to your own research, you don’t want to miss this event!

Professor Walter Leitner – Chair of the Green Chemistry Editorial Board

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Top 10 cited review articles in 2012

A green chemistry coverAs the year draws to a close, here is a list of the top 10 cited review articles in Green Chemistry in 2012 – all free to access until the end of January 2013!

Technology development for the production of biobased products from biorefinery carbohydrates—the US Department of Energy’s “Top 10” revisited, Joseph J. Bozell and Gene R. Petersen, Green Chem., 2010, 12, 539-554

 Converting carbohydrates to bulk chemicals and fine chemicals over heterogeneous catalysts, Maria J. Climent, Avelino Corma and Sara Iborra, Green Chem., 2011, 13, 520-540

Catalytic conversion of biomass to biofuels, David Martin Alonso, Jesse Q. Bond and James A. Dumesic, Green Chem., 2010, 12, 1493-1513

Green chemistry by nano-catalysis, Vivek Polshettiwar and Rajender S. Varma, Green Chem., 2010, 12, 743-754

Synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and CO2, Michael North, Riccardo Pasquale and Carl Young, Green Chem., 2010, 12, 1514-1539

Searching for green solvents, Philip G. Jessop, Green Chem., 2011, 13, 1391-1398

5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) as a building block platform: Biological properties, synthesis and synthetic applications, Andreia A. Rosatella, Svilen P. Simeonov, Raquel F. M. Frade and Carlos A. M. Afonso, Green Chem., 2011, 13, 754-793

Vegetable oil-based polymeric materials: synthesis, properties, and applications, Ying Xia and Richard C. Larock, Green Chem., 2010, 12, 1893-1909

Glycerol as a sustainable solvent for green chemistry, Yanlong Gu and François Jérôme, Green Chem., 2010, 12, 1127-1138

Enzyme-mediated oxidations for the chemist, Frank Hollmann, Isabel W. C. E. Arends, Katja Buehler, Anett Schallmey and Bruno Bühler, Green Chem., 2011, 13, 226-265

Stay up-to-date with the latest news and content in Green Chemistry by registering for our free table of contents alerts.

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Green Chemistry 15 years on…

In January 1999 the first issue of Green Chemistry was published with an Editorial written by James Clark, setting out his vision for the Journal.

GC 1999 Issue 1 Cover jpg

1999: First cover of Green Chemistry

Green Chemistry, 2013, Vol. 15, issue 1 front cover

GC, Vol. 15, issue 1 front cover

To mark the occasion of the Journal entering it’s fifteenth year of publication in 2013 we will be having a number of interesting articles asking those scientists who have contributed to the Journal strategy to reflect on how the subject has changed over the last 15 years and asking them for their vision on the subject in the future. 

We will also be highlighting those papers that have been most cited over the years – the papers that you as readers have been citing the most. 

Details about all of these activities will be posted on the Green Chemistry blog throughout 2013.

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C-H activation: an article collection

Picture showing several chemical reaction schemes and moleculesOne of the simplest and most utilised chemical reactions is the burning of hydrocarbons and while combustion is an excellent way to exploit the energy content of this naturally occurring resource, there is a lot more we can do with the ‘inert’ C-H bond.

C-H activation allows us to convert cheaper hydrocarbon starting materials into more valuable and versatile products; leading to the development of a wide range of reagents and catalysts that activate C-H bonds. To keep you up to date with the latest developments in the field we have created this article collection, where all articles are free to download until 15th December.

Click here fore the full list of free articles

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Top ten most accessed articles in September

This month sees the following articles in Green Chemistry that are in the top ten most accessed:-

A simple and efficient approach for the palladium-catalyzed ligand-free Suzuki reaction in water 
Chun Liu, Yixia Zhang, Ning Liu and Jieshan Qiu  
Green Chem., 2012, 14, 2999-3003 
DOI: 10.1039/c2gc36098e 

Multicomponent reactions in unconventional solvents: state of the art 
Yanlong Gu  
Green Chem., 2012, 14, 2091-2128 
DOI: 10.1039/c2gc35635j 

Transition metal-free, NaOtBu-O2-mediated one-pot cascade oxidation of allylic alcohols to α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acids 
Sun Min Kim, Young Sug Kim, Dong Wan Kim and Jung Woon Yang  
Green Chem., 2012, 14, 2996-2998 
DOI: 10.1039/c2gc36203a 

Low melting mixtures in organic synthesis – an alternative to ionic liquids? 
Carolin Ruß and Burkhard König  
Green Chem., 2012, 14, 2969-2982 
DOI: 10.1039/c2gc36005e 

A convenient guide to help select replacement solvents for dichloromethane in chromatography 
Joshua P. Taygerly,  Larry M. Miller,  Alicia Yee and Emily A. Peterson  
Green Chem., 2012, 14, 3020-3025 
DOI: 10.1039/c2gc36064k 

Gold nanoparticles stabilized on nanocrystalline magnesium oxide as an active catalyst for reduction of nitroarenes in aqueous medium at room temperature 
Keya Layek, M. Lakshmi Kantam,  Masayuki Shirai, Daisuke Nishio-Hamane, Takehiko Sasaki and H. Maheswaran  
Green Chem., 2012, 14, 3164-3174 
DOI: 10.1039/c2gc35917k 

Highly atom-economic, catalyst- and solvent-free oxidation of sulfides into sulfones using 30% aqueous H2O2 
Marjan Jereb  
Green Chem., 2012, 14, 3047-3052 
DOI: 10.1039/c2gc36073j 

A one-pot approach for conversion of fructose to 2,5-diformylfuran by combination of Fe3O4-SBA-SO3H and K-OMS-2 
Yao Fu  
Green Chem., 2012, 14, 2986-2989 
DOI: 10.1039/c2gc35947b 

What’s new with CO2? Recent advances in its copolymerization with oxiranes 
Donald J. Darensbourg and Stephanie J. Wilson  
Green Chem., 2012, 14, 2665-2671 
DOI: 10.1039/c2gc35928f 

Transfer hydrogenation of ketones by ceria-supported Ni catalysts 
Katsuya Shimura and Ken-ichi Shimizu  
Green Chem., 2012, 14, 2983-2985 
DOI: 10.1039/c2gc35836k 

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Green Chemistry? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us with your suggestions.

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Biocatalysis: an article collection

Picture of an EnzymeBeers, wines and cheeses are enjoyed around the world today and have been for millennia. In fact the practices of brewing and cheese-making pre-date recorded history so it is difficult to accurately determine when we first started using naturally occurring enzymes and microorganisms to create valuable (and in this case, tastier!) products.

Biocatalysts are of course used in far more diverse applications than the creation of food-stuffs, including in many organic syntheses and in the generation of fine chemicals. Due to their natural design, they can offer superior selectivity for particular products and have a far lower environmental impact than many traditional catalysts. Our knowledge and understanding of biocatalysts has increased dramatically in the last few decades, which has allowed us to develop biologically modified and biomimetic catalysts for a range of applications.

To keep you up to date with the latest advances in this rapidly expanding field we have collected together these high impact articles and made them free to access until the 31st October!

Click here for the full list of free articles

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Top ten most accessed articles in August

This month sees the following articles in Green Chemistry that are in the top ten most accessed:-

L-Proline-promoted three-component reaction of anilines, aldehydes and barbituric acids/malononitrile: regioselective synthesis of 5-arylpyrimido[4,5-b]quinoline-diones and 2-amino-4-arylquinoline-3-carbonitriles in water
Ali Khalafi-Nezhad, Samira Sarikhani, Elham Shaikhi Shahidzadeh and Farhad Panahi
Green Chem., 2012, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC35765H, Paper

Multicomponent reactions in unconventional solvents: state of the art
Yanlong Gu
Green Chem., 2012, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC35635J, Critical Review

KOH-mediated transition metal-free synthesis of imines from alcohols and amines
Jian Xu, Rongqiang Zhuang, Lingling Bao, Guo Tang and Yufen Zhao
Green Chem., 2012, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC35714C, Communication

A Convenient Guide to Help Select Replacement Solvents for Dichloromethane in Chromatography
Joshua P. Taygerly, Larry M. Miller, Alicia Yee and Emily A. Peterson
Green Chem., 2012, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC36064K, Paper

One-step hydrogenolysis of glycerol to biopropanols over Pt-H4SiW12O40/ZrO2 catalysts
Shanhui Zhu, Yulei Zhu, Shunli Hao, Hongyan Zheng, Tao Mo and Yongwang Li
Green Chem., 2012,14, 2607-2616, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC35564G, Paper

Experimental and theoretical studies on imidazolium ionic liquid-promoted conversion of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural
Yu-Nong Li, Jin-Quan Wang, Liang-Nian He, Zhen-Zhen Yang, An-Hua Liu, Bing Yu and Chao-Ran Luan
Green Chem., 2012, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC35845J, Paper

Design and synthesis of benzylpyrazolyl coumarin derivatives via a four-component reaction in water: investigation of the weak interactions accumulating in the crystal structure of a signified compound
Partha Pratim Ghosh, Gargi Pal, Sanjay Paul and Asish R. Das
Green Chem., 2012, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC36021G, Communication

A new route of CO2 catalytic activation: syntheses of N-substituted carbamates from dialkyl carbonates and polyureas
Jianpeng Shang, Shimin Liu, Xiangyuan Ma, Liujin Lu and Youquan Deng
Green Chem., 2012, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC36043H, Paper

Pd-grafted periodic mesoporous organosilica: an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for Hiyama and Sonogashira couplings, and cyanation reactions
Arindam Modak, John Mondal and Asim Bhaumik
Green Chem., 2012, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC35820D, Paper

PEG-functionalized ionic liquids for cellulose dissolution and saccharification
Shaokun Tang, Gary A. Baker, Sudhir Ravula, John E. Jones and Hua Zhao
Green Chem., 2012, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC35631G, Paper

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Green Chemistry? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us with your suggestions.

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Article collection: Renewable energy

One of the greatest challenges facing society and science is developing alternative, renewable energy sources to traditional (and non-renewable) petroleum products.  Below is a selection of Green Chemistry articles giving you a snapshot of the high quality work we publish in this area.

You can enjoy free access to these articles for a limited time only, so why not take a look?   Stay up-to-date with the latest content in Green Chemistry by registering for our free table of contents alerts.

Etherification and reductive etherification of 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural: 5-(alkoxymethyl)furfurals and 2,5-bis(alkoxymethyl)furans as potential bio-diesel candidates, Madhesan Balakrishnan, Eric R. Sacia and Alexis T. Bell, Green Chem., 2012, 14, 1626-1634

The fate of bio-carbon in FCC co-processing products, Gabriella Fogassy, Nicolas Thegarid, Yves Schuurman and Claude Mirodatos, Green Chem., 2012, 14, 1367-1371

Liquid hydrocarbon fuels from cellulosic feedstocks via thermal deoxygenation of levulinic acid and formic acid salt mixtures, Paige A. Case, Adriaan R. P. van Heiningen and M. Clayton Wheeler, Green Chem., 2012, 14, 85-89

A technical evaluation of biodiesel from vegetable oils vs. algae. Will algae-derived biodiesel perform?, Gerhard Knothe, Green Chem., 2011, 13, 3048-3065

Production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels by catalytic conversion of biomass-derived levulinic acid, Drew J. Braden, Carlos A. Henao, Jacob Heltzel, Christos C. Maravelias and James A. Dumesic, Green Chem., 2011, 13, 1755-1765

Algae as a source of renewable chemicals: opportunities and challenges, Patrick M. Foley, Evan S. Beach and Julie B. Zimmerman, Green Chem., 2011, 13, 1399-1405

An efficient activity ionic liquid-enzyme system for biodiesel production, Teresa De Diego, Arturo Manjón, Pedro Lozano, Michel Vaultier and José L. Iborra, Green Chem., 2011, 13, 444-451

Production of jet and diesel fuel range alkanes from waste hemicellulose-derived aqueous solutions, Rong Xing, Ayyagari V. Subrahmanyam, Hakan Olcay, Wei Qi, G. Peter van Walsum, Hemant Pendse and George W. Huber, Green Chem., 2010, 12, 1933-1946

Technology development for the production of biobased products from biorefinery carbohydrates—the US Department of Energy’s “Top 10” revisited, Joseph J. Bozell and Gene R. Petersen, Green Chem., 2010, 12, 539-554

Mechanocatalysis for biomass-derived chemicals and fuels, Sandra M. Hick, Carolin Griebel, David T. Restrepo, Joshua H. Truitt, Eric J. Buker, Caroline Bylda and Richard G. Blair, Green Chem., 2010, 12, 468-474

High-yield conversion of plant biomass into the key value-added feedstocks 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural, levulinic acid, and levulinic esters via 5-(chloromethyl)furfural, Mark Mascal and Edward B. Nikitin, Green Chem., 2010, 12, 370-373

Ionic liquid tolerant hyperthermophilic cellulases for biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis, Supratim Datta,  Bradley Holmes, Joshua I. Park, Zhiwei Chen, Dean C. Dibble, Masood Hadi, Harvey W. Blanch, Blake A. Simmons and Rajat Sapra, Green Chem., 2010, 12, 338-345

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