Author Archive

Web Collection marking 15 years of publication of Green Chemistry

To mark the occasion of Green Chemistry completing fifteen years of publication we invited contributions from authors who have had highly cited articles from each of the past 15 years. The result is a growing web collection covering topics of current importance in green chemistry from those who have contributed to developing the field. Details of the contributors, their highly cited article from the year they are representing, and their recent contribution are below. 

Accompanying this collection and further celebrating ‘15 years of Green Chemistry’ is an Editorial containing contributions from all of Green Chemistry’s Chairs of the Editorial board and Scientific Editors giving their views on the area of green chemistry and the changes they have seen since the Journal was launched in 1999… read the Editorial here.

The 15 Years of Green Chemistry collection will be added to throughout 2014 and you can access the articles by clicking on the titles below, or look at the full collection of recent articles online here

Year 15 Years of Green Chemistry Contribution Original Highly Cited Article
1999 Journey on greener pathways: from the use of alternate energy inputs and benign reaction media to sustainable applications of nano-catalysts in synthesis and environmental remediation
Rajender S. Varma, 2014, Perspective
Solvent-free organic syntheses. using supported reagents and microwave irradiation, Rajender S. Varma, 1999, Paper
2000 Food waste biomass: a resource for high-value chemicals
Lucie A. Pfaltzgraff, Mario De bruyn, Emma C. Cooper, Vitaly Budarin and  James H. Clark, 2013, Perspective
Preparation of a novel silica-supported palladium catalyst and its use in the Heck reaction
James H. Clark, Duncan J. Macquarrie and Egid B. Mubofu, 2000, Paper
2001 Mixing ionic liquids – “simple mixtures” or “double salts”?
Gregory Chatel, Jorge F. B. Pereira, Varun Debbeti, Hui Wang and Robin D. Rogers, Green Chem., 2014, Critical Review
Characterization and comparison of hydrophilic and hydrophobic room temperature ionic liquids incorporating the imidazolium cation, Jonathan G. Huddleston, Ann E. Visser, W. Matthew Reichert, Heather D. Willauer, Grant A. Broker and Robin D. Rogers, 2001, paper
2005 Green and sustainable manufacture of chemicals from biomass: state of the art
Roger A. Sheldon, 2014, Critical Review
Green solvents for sustainable organic synthesis: state of the art
Roger A. Sheldon, 2005, Critical Review
2008 Towards resource efficient chemistry: Tandem reactions with renewables
Arno Behr, Andreas Johannes Vorholt, Thomas Seidensticker and Karoline Anna Ostrowski, 2013, Critical Review
Improved utilisation of renewable resources: New important derivatives of glycerol
Arno Behr, Jens Eilting, Ken Irawadi, Julia Leschinski and Falk Lindner, 2008, Critical Review
2009 Conversion of glucose and cellulose into value-added products in water and ionic liquids
Jinliang Song, Honglei Fan, Jun Ma and Buxing, 2013, Tutorial Review
Efficient conversion of glucose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural catalyzed by a common Lewis acid SnCl4 in an ionic liquid
Suqin Hu, Zhaofu Zhang, Jinliang Song, Yinxi Zhou and Buxing Han, 2009, Communication
2011 Conversion of biomass platform molecules into fuel additives and liquid hydrocarbon fuels
Maria J. Climent, Avelino Corma and Sara Iborra, 2014, Critical Review
Converting carbohydrates to bulk chemicals and fine chemicals over heterogeneous catalysts
Maria J. Climent, Avelino Corma and Sara Iborra, 2011, Critical Review
2012 Continuous process technology: a tool for sustainable production
Charlotte Wiles and Paul Watts, 2014, Tutorial Review
Continuous flow reactors: a perspective
Charlotte Wiles and Paul Watts, 2012, Tutorial Review
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Editorial celebrating 15 years of Green Chemistry

James Clark (Scientific Editor, 199-2003)

James Clark, Scientific Editor, 1999-2003

The first issue of Green Chemistry was published in January 1999; as 2013 comes to a close we are celebrating the completion of 15 years of publication. Over these 15 years articles published in the Journal have recorded the evolving priorities in green chemistry research.

To mark this significant milestone we invited past Chairs of the Editorial Board and Scientific Editors for their views on the area of green chemistry, and the changes they have seen since the Journal was launched.

The result is a wonderfully thought-provoking Editorial which is published in 2014 Issue 1 and we hope you enjoy reading.

Read the Editorial celebrating 15 years of Green Chemistry online for free here.

Walter Leitner (Scientific Editor 2004-2012 and Editorial Board Chair 2012-Present)

Walter Leitner, Scientific Editor 2004-2012 and Editorial Board Chair 2012-Present

Roger Sheldon (Editorial Board Chair 1999-2001)

Roger Sheldon, Editorial Board Chair 1999-2001

Colin Raston (Editorial Board Chair 2002-2005)

Colin Raston, Editorial Board Chair 2002-2005

Martyn Poliakoff (Editorial Board Chair 2006-2011)

Martyn Poliakoff, Editorial Board Chair 2006-2011


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Green Chemistry impact factor reaches another record high of 6.8

We are delighted to announce that Green Chemistry’s Impact Factor* has risen to a new high of 6.8!

Walter Leitner, Chair of the Green Chemistry Editorial Board said of the news: “Once again, the impact factor for Green Chemistry has seen a significant increase, reaching an all-time high of 6.8. This is due to the excellent research of the community and the dedication of the authors to share their exciting results, the enormous efforts by the referees to ensure the highest quality, the distinguished profile of the journal and the tremendous and exceptionally professional job of the management office! Taking the impact factor as tool (not the goal) for a journal to measure the reception of its content by the community, I think we can all be proud of this development.”

We would like to thank all our authors, referees, readers and Editorial and Advisory Board  members for their help and support on the Journal.

Green Chemistry was launched 15 years ago and ever since has led the way publishing cutting edge research on the development of alternative sustainable technologies. We invite you to submit your latest research on sustainable chemistry and technology to Green Chemistry. 

Keep up-to-date with the latest content in Green Chemistry by registering for our free table of contents alerts. 

Read more about the 2012 Impact Factors on the RSC Publishing Blog.

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. Data based on 2012 Journal Citation Reports®, (Thomson Reuters, 2013).

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Recycling rare earth elements using ionic liquids

Recycling old magnets, so that rare-earth metals can be re-used, could help to solve an urgent raw material supply problem in the electronics industry. Researchers from the University of Leuven, Belgium, have used ionic liquids to separate neodymium and samarium from transition metals like iron, manganese and cobalt – all elements that are used in the construction of permanent rare-earth magnets, which are found in electronic devices ranging from hard drives to air conditioners and wind turbines.

‘The process involves the liquid-liquid extraction of rare-earth metals from the other elements present in neodymium-iron-boron and samarium-cobalt magnets,’ explains Koen Binnemans who leads the group developing the process. ‘These other elements – including iron, cobalt, manganese, copper and zinc – are extracted into the ionic-liquid phase, while the rare-earth metals are left behind in the aqueous phase,’ he says, adding that the ionic liquid itself – trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium chloride – can also be re-used, after the transition metals have been stripped out.

In traditional liquid-liquid extractions of metal ions, an aqueous phase containing the metal salt is mixed with an organic phase containing an extraction agent. Simple though they are, these processes use organic phases comprising flammable and volatile solvents, like toluene, kerosene or diethyl ether. Ionic liquids are far more environmentally friendly, having very low vapour pressure and non-flammability.

Read the full article in Chemistry World

Read the original journal article in Green Chemistry:

Removal of transition metals from rare earths by solvent extraction with an undiluted phosphonium ionic liquid: separations relevant to rare-earth magnet recycling
Tom Vander Hoogerstraete,  Sil Wellens,  Katrien Verachtert and Koen Binnemans
Green Chem., 2013,15, 919-927

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Green Chemistry Issue 4 now online

Green Chemistry issue 4 is now online and you can read it here.

Issue 4 front coverThe cover features work by François Jérôme and co-workers from France.  Their Paper, ‘Pretreatment of microcrystalline cellulose by ultrasounds: effect of particle size in the heterogeneously-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose’ demonstrates that activity of a sulfonated carbon in the heterogeneously-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose was greatly improved by assistance of ultrasound. The paper demonstrates that the sonication method was as effective as conventional pre-treatments such as ball-milling or ionic liquids.

Pretreatment of microcrystalline cellulose by ultrasounds: effect of particle size in the heterogeneously-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose
Qinghua Zhang, Maud Benoit, Karine De Oliveira Vigier, Joël Barrault, Gwenaëlle Jégou, Michel Philippe and François Jérôme, Green Chem., 2013, 15, 963-969

Issue 4 inside cover

The inside front cover highlights a review article entitled ‘Green chemistry and the ocean-based biorefinery’ by Fran Kerton and co-workers at the Memorial University of Newfoundland in Canada.  This review highlights that competition for land use could be minimized if marine sourced feedstocks were used for chemicals and materials production rather than crops grown on fertile land. It focuses on achievements and potential opportunities surrounding the use of algae and waste from shellfish and finfish processing.

Green chemistry and the ocean-based biorefinery
Francesca M. Kerton, Yi Liu, Khaled W. Omari and Kelly Hawboldt, Green Chem., 2013, 15, 860-871

These articles are free to access for 6 weeks!

Keep up-to-date with the latest content in Green Chemistry by registering for our free table of contents alerts.

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Green Chemistry 15 years on…

In January 1999 the first issue of Green Chemistry was published with an Editorial written by James Clark, setting out his vision for the Journal.

GC 1999 Issue 1 Cover jpg

1999: First cover of Green Chemistry

Green Chemistry, 2013, Vol. 15, issue 1 front cover

GC, Vol. 15, issue 1 front cover

To mark the occasion of the Journal entering it’s fifteenth year of publication in 2013 we will be having a number of interesting articles asking those scientists who have contributed to the Journal strategy to reflect on how the subject has changed over the last 15 years and asking them for their vision on the subject in the future. 

We will also be highlighting those papers that have been most cited over the years – the papers that you as readers have been citing the most. 

Details about all of these activities will be posted on the Green Chemistry blog throughout 2013.

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Sustainability in Chemical Synthesis Conference

Anna Simpson, Deputy Editor of Green Chemistry (pictured below, centre) attended the Sustainability in Chemical Synthesis Conference, held at the Chemistry Department of TU Kaiserslautern from the 16th -18th September. 

Kaiserslautern

From left to right: Lukas Gooßen, Anna Simpson and Oliver Kreye

This meeting was organised by the Sustainable Chemistry Section of the Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (German Chemical Society, GDCh).  The series was started in 2007 to bring scientists from the community of sustainable chemistry together for exchanging ideas and new scientific insights. 

The 2012 scientific programme put an emphasis on state-of-the-art organic synthesis by covering, in particular, methods of carbon-carbon, carbon-hetroatom, and carbon-hydrogen bond formation.  Topics on chemicals from biomass were similarly covered as was the invention of new catalytic processes for achieving valuable new chemical transformations.

The Green Chemistry poster prize was won by Oliver Kreye from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (far right in picture above) and it was presented by Professor Lukas Gooßen, co-organiser of the conference (far left in picture above).

The full title of the winning poster was The first catalytic Lossen rearrangement: Sustainable access to Carbamates and Amines, authored by: Oliver Kreye, Sarah Wald and Michael Meier.  You may be interested in ‘meeting our author’ Michael Meier, click here.

Congratulations to Oliver on winning this prize.

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How synthetic organic chemistry can help to feed the world

Azoxystrobin is the world’s leading agricultural fungicide. It is a fully synthetic compound, whose invention was inspired by the structure and activity of the naturally-occurring fungicide strobilurin A. Today it is used worldwide to control fungi growing on over 120 types of crop, improving plant health, raising quality and increasing yield. The success of the project highlights the crucial importance of chemistry in meeting grand challenges such as global food security and the broader applicability of skills such as natural product synthesis. Keynote speaker Dr John Clough led the team of chemists at Syngenta that invented azoxystrobin. He will discuss the key role that synthetic organic chemistry played in creating an effective and safe fungicide. This policy event is organised by the Royal Society of Chemistry as part of a series of lectures designed to bring together active researchers and policy makers to highlight the role of the chemical sciences in tackling societal issues.

Be inspired - The Chemistry Centre

This event will be held in the Chemistry Centre on 26 September at the RSC’s recently refurbished building in Burlington House, London. Doors will open at 17:30 for refreshments. The event will begin at 18:00 and will finish with a wine reception. Please follow the link here for information and to register for the event.

If you cannot make it why not watch the video of the event which will be uploaded on the website after the event.

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New Editorial Board Chair for Green Chemistry

We are delighted to announce the appointment of Walter Leitner as the new Chair of the Green Chemistry Editorial Board. 

Walter Leitner

Walter Leitner

Walter is a full professor at Technische Chemie und Petrolchemie, Institut für Technische Chemie und Makromolekulare Chemie at the RWTH Aachen University and has been involved in the development of the Journal through his role as Scientific Editor. We look forward to the start of a new era with Walter as Chair of the Green Chemistry Editorial Board.

Martyn Poliakoff

The start of a new era must, unfortunately, see the end of another and after six years as Chair of the Editorial Board Martyn Poliakoff is stepping down.  Green Chemistry is privileged to have been guided by one of the most prominent green chemists and we wish to thank Martyn for all his hard work and endless enthusiasm he has brought to the Journal.  Martyn bids the journal farewell in a recently published editorial entitled ‘Paul Anastas and the Robin Hood Question’
Intrigued? Find out more by reading the Editorial here.

Keep up-to-date with the latest content in Green Chemistry by registering for our free table of contents alerts.

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Incredible ionic liquids: an article collection

Ionic liquids are pretty self explanatory; they are ionic materials in a liquid state. In a ‘normal’ liquid, interactions are usually governed by Van de Waals or H-bonding forces. In ionic liquids it is ionic bonding interactions which dominate, meaning ionic liquids possess some interesting and unique properties.

The field of ionic liquids grew after Paul Walden’s observations of ethylammonium nitrate in 1914,1 since then the study and use of ionic liquids has grown phenomenally, with applications in analytics, biology, electrochemistry, physical chemistry, engineering, solvents and catalysis.

The academic and industrial interest in ionic liquids has thrown up some remarkable discoveries, particularly in recent years, so to keep you up to date with latest break-through research in the field we have collected these high quality articles which are free to access!*

(more…)

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