Author Archive

Green Chemistry research leads to major milestone in MOFs development

Following publication in Green Chemistry of:

Aqueous production of spherical Zr-MOF beads via continuous-flow spray-drying

Ceren Avci-Camur, Javier Troyano, Javier Pérez-Carvajal, Alexandre Legrand, David Farrusseng, Inhar Imaz and Daniel Maspoch
Green Chem., 2018, 20, 873-878. DOI: 10.1039/C7GC03132G

EU project partners research team have successfully developed synthesis processes enabling the manufacture of metal organic framework (MOFs) materials at an industrial scale. These innovative methods have reduced production costs permitting MOFs to be priced competitively against many current market leading materials. Being able to offer MOFs at an economically viable cost and utilising their superior performance, these materials are perfectly suited to meet tomorrow’s big challenges in energy, environmental and health related application areas.

 

Find out more and read the press releases:

http://www.prodia-mof.eu/news.html

http://www.axel-one.org/press

 

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Introducing new Green Chemistry Editorial Board member: François Jérôme

François Jérôme, University of Poitiers, France

François received his PhD degree in chemistry from the University of Burgundy (France) in 2000 in the group of Prof. R. Guilard. Then, he moved as a postdoc to the University of California of Davis (USA) and the group of Prof. K. M. Smith followed by a second postdoctoral position at the University of Rennes 1 under the guidance of Prof. P. H. Dixneuf where he worked on ruthenium-catalyzed reactions. In 2002, he joined the CNRS as a permanent researcher in the Laboratoire de Catalyse en Chimie Organique located at the University of Poitiers. In 2011, he was promoted as a CNRS research director at the Institut de Chimie des Milieux et Matériaux de Poitiers. In 2015, he created the research federation INCREASE, hosted by the CNRS, gathering scientists from academia working together with chemical companies on the design of sustainable chemicals.

He is now deputy of the Institut de Chimie des Milieux et Matériaux de Poitiers, member of the executive committee of the French division of Catalysis and chairman of the International Symposium on Green Chemistry (ISGC); editions 2013, 2015, 2017 and 2019.

His main research interests concern the development of technologies capable of activating and converting concentrated feed of renewable polyols (glycerol, mono- and polysaccharides) to specialty chemicals.

 

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2017 Green Chemistry HOT Articles collection

This collection showcases all 2017 Green Chemistry articles highlighted as HOT by the handling editor. Congratulations to all the authors whose articles are featured.

Read it here for free until the end of February 2018

It includes:

Perspective 
The E factor 25 years on: the rise of green chemistry and sustainability
Roger A. Sheldon
Green Chem., 2017, 19, 18-43. DOI: 10.1039/C6GC02157C

Critical Review 
Lignin transformations for high value applications: towards targeted modifications using green chemistry
S. Gillet, M. Aguedo, L. Petitjean, A. R. C. Morais, A. M. da Costa Lopes, R. M. Łukasik and P. T. Anastas
Green Chem., 2017, 19, 4200-4233. DOI: 10.1039/C7GC01479A

Tutorial Review 
Metal–organic frameworks meet scalable and sustainable synthesis
Patrick A. Julien, Cristina Mottillo and Tomislav Friščić
Green Chem., 2017, 19, 2729-2747. DOI: 10.1039/C7GC01078H

Communication 
Incorporation of carbon dioxide into phthalides via ligand-free copper-catalyzed direct carboxylation of benzoxasiloles
Thanh V. Q. Nguyen, José A. Rodríguez-Santamaría, Woo-Jin Yoo and Shū Kobayashi
Green Chem., 2017, 19, 2501-2505. DOI: 10.1039/C7GC00917H

Communication 
Effective separation of aromatic and aliphatic amino acid mixtures using ionic-liquid-based aqueous biphasic systems
Emanuel V. Capela, Maria V. Quental, Pedro Domingues, João A. P. Coutinho and Mara G. Freire
Green Chem., 2017, 19, 1850-1854. DOI: 10.1039/C6GC03060B

Paper 
Metal-catalyzed reductive deamination of glutamic acid to bio-based dimethyl glutarate and methylamines
Free De Schouwer, Thomas Cuypers, Laurens Claes and Dirk E. De Vos
Green Chem., 2017, 19, 1866-1876. DOI: 10.1039/C6GC03222B

Paper 
Biphasic extraction of mechanocatalytically-depolymerized lignin from water-soluble wood and its catalytic downstream processing
Gaetano Calvaruso, Matthew T. Clough and Roberto Rinaldi
Green Chem., 2017, 19, 2803-2811. DOI: 10.1039/C6GC03191A

We hope you enjoy reading the articles.

Is your research HOT? Our editors are already handpicking the hottest 2018 content for our rolling 2018 . Submit your work for consideration now.

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Superchemist front cover depicts research of tropylium salts in acetalization reactions

Tropylium salts as efficient organic Lewis acid catalysts for acetalization and transacetalization reactions in batch and flow

Acetalization reactions play significant roles in the synthetically important masking chemistry of carbonyl compounds. In their paper the authors demonstrate for the first time that tropylium salts can act as organic Lewis acid catalysts to facilitate acetalization and transacetalization reactions of a wide range of aldehyde substrates. This metal-free method works efficiently in both batch and flow conditions, prompting further future applications of tropylium organocatalysts in green synthesis.

As featured on the front cover of Green Chemistry Issue 17, Dr Vinh Nguyen tells us a little more about the artwork: “This graphic features a “superchemist” in safety goggles and white labcoat/cape holding a round-bottom flask. He is holding a heptagonal shield representing our tropylium ion. There are engravings on the shield denoting what chemicals can be used to protect the “carbonyl compound” on his chest.”

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Green Chemistry publishes: a new way to remove 99% of harmful BPA from water

Green Chemistry Review gains worldwide press coverage.

An international team of scientists have designed a water treatment system that can remove the harmful chemical BPA from water with 99% effectiveness – as published in Green Chemistry.

Dr Matthew DeNardo, one of the review‘s authors and the primary author of the BPA sections tells us about how the work came together:

The Institute for Green Science at Carnegie Mellon University, which is led by Terrence J. Collins, the Teresa Heinz Professor of Green Chemistry, focuses on the multidisciplinary development of TAML processes for the removal of endocrine disruptors from waters. Production of this authentic, high-quality work, requires engagement of the many fields necessary to direct chemistry towards sustainability. For example, this manuscript would not have been possible without significant contributions from The Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology at Oregon State University and both The Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering and Centre for Green Chemical Science at the University of Auckland.

The mini-reviews, which Dr. Collins and I wrote together, unify the findings of several disciplines concisely to illuminate the emergent truths. It is fitting that this ‘level of thought’ is necessary to both demonstrate the massive challenge facing the chemical enterprise and the path towards better chemical design and stewardship. Composing these sections, which was both necessary and right, was met with generous financial and moral support, an all-too-rare response for which I will be ever-grateful to Dr. Collins and the Heinz Endowments. I am also deeply indebted to all of the authors for their efforts and patience.

Read the original Green Chemistry publication here.

Find out more about the breakthrough from science outlets including Environmental Health News, Phys.org, New Scientist and RSC News.

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Harvesting Renewable Energy with Chemistry themed collection now online

We are delighted to announce that the Green Chemistry themed collection on Harvesting Renewable Energy with Chemistry is now online and free to access until the end of July 2017.

Direct, efficient, and selective routes from renewable energies to targeted added-value chemicals are a crucial token of the necessary paradigm shift towards energy systems based on renewable resources. Guest-edited by Walter Leitner, Alessandra Quadrelli and Robert Schlögl, this special issue will highlight innovative concepts and recent developments in academia and industry at the interface between the energy and chemical sector.

Read the full collection online

It includes:

Editorial
Harvesting renewable energy with chemistry
Walter Leitner, Elsje Alessandra Quadrelli and Robert Schlögl
Green Chem., 2017, 19, 2307-2308. DOI: 10.1039/C7GC90045G

Critical review
Structural models of the biological oxygen-evolving complex: achievements, insights, and challenges for biomimicry
Satadal Paul, Frank Neese and Dimitrios A. Pantazis
Green Chem., 2017, 19, 2309-2325. DOI: 10.1039/C7GC00425G

Critical review
Syngas production from electrochemical reduction of CO2: current status and prospective implementation
Simelys Hernández, M. Amin Farkhondehfal, Francesc Sastre, Michiel Makkee, Guido Saracco and Nunzio Russo
Green Chem., 2017, 19, 2326-2346. DOI: 10.1039/C7GC00398F

Communication
Earth-abundant photocatalytic systems for the visible-light-driven reduction of CO2 to CO
Alonso Rosas-Hernández, Christoph Steinlechner, Henrik Junge and Matthias Beller
Green Chem., 2017, 19, 2356-2360. DOI: 10.1039/C6GC03527B

Paper
Water splitting using a three-dimensional plasmonic photoanode with titanium dioxide nano-tunnels
Ryohei Takakura, Tomoya Oshikiri, Kosei Ueno, Xu Shi, Toshiaki Kondo, Hideki Masuda and Hiroaki Misawa
Green Chem., 2017, 19, 2398-2405. DOI: 10.1039/C6GC03217F

Paper
Continuous niobium phosphate catalysed Skraup reaction for quinoline synthesis from solketal
Jing Jin, Sandro Guidi, Zahra Abada, Zacharias Amara, Maurizio Selva, Michael W. George and Martyn Poliakoff
Green Chem., 2017, 19, 2439-2447. DOI: 10.1039/C6GC03140D

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Green Chemistry’s Impact Factor increases to 9.125

Green Chemistry is delighted to announce its Impact Factor has increased to 9.125*.

Green Chemistry continues to lead the field as the home of cutting-edge science for the development of alternative sustainable technologies and number 1 journal in the ‘Green & Sustainable Science & Technology’ category of the Journal Citation Reports.

The broad scope and interdisciplinary nature of the research published in the journal, coupled with rigorous peer review and rapid times to publication of 49 days** from receipt to acceptance, ensures your work will quickly attract the attention it deserves.

We would like to thank all our authors, readers, reviewers and Editorial & Advisory Board members for making Green Chemistry a unique forum for research that enables a greener sustainable future

Find the all the RSC’s journals newly published 2016 Impact Factors* here.

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year, by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. Data based on 2016 Journal Citation Reports® (Thomson Reuters).

**2016 average

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New Green Chemistry Associate Editor: Alessandra Quadrelli

We are delighted to welcome Dr Elsje Alessandra Quadrelli as our newest Green Chemistry Associate Editor.

Alessandra Quadrelli, CNRS and ESCPE Lyon, France

ORCiD http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8606-1183

Alessandra is the CNRS director of research in the “Surface organometallic chemistry” team of the C2P2 laboratory in Lyon (France). Her research in the C2P2 unit, under triple tutelage CNRS CPE and Université de Lyon 1, focuses on gaining molecular understanding of the interaction between organometallic precursors and solid surfaces, such as silica and more recently, metal organic frameworks and 2D supports, in route to heterogeneous catalysts and functional materials. As chairwoman of the Sustainability Chair of Chemical, Physics and Electronic Engineering School CPE Lyon, she teaches graduate and undergraduate courses an organizes the biyearly international conference “CO2 Forum” on large scale carbon dioxide utilisations”.

As a Green Chemistry Associate Editor, Alessandra will provide her expertise in particular in the fields of:

  • Surface organometallic chemistry
  • Supported catalysis
  • Inorganic oxides
  • MOFs
  • Small molecule activation

Submit your best green chemistry work in these areas to Alessandra now.

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New Green Chemistry Editorial Board Members: Michael Meier and Rajender S. Varma

We are delighted to welcome Dr Rajender S. Varma and Professor Michael Meier to the Green Chemistry Editorial Board.

Michael Meier, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
Michael Meier is full professor at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT, Germany) since 2010. He received his diploma degree (M.Sc.) in chemistry in 2002 from the University of Regensburg (Germany) and his PhD under the supervision of Prof. Ulrich S. Schubert from the Eindhoven University of Technology (the Netherlands) in 2006. His research interests include the sustainable use and derivatization of renewable resources for polymer chemistry as well as the design of novel highly defined macromolecular architectures.

Rajender S. Varma, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, USA
Rajender S. Varma was born in India and received his Ph.D. from Delhi University, 1976. After postdoctoral research at Robert Robinson Laboratories, Liverpool, U.K., he was faculty member at Baylor College of Medicine and Sam Houston State University prior to joining the Sustainable Technology Division at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1999 with an adjunct appointment at Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. He has over 40 years of research experience in management of multidisciplinary technical programs and is extensively involved in sustainable aspects of chemistry that include photocatalysis, synthesis, environmental sciences, and development of environmentally benign synthetic methods using alternate energy input using microwaves, ultrasound, mechanochemistry, etc.; efficient technologies for greener remediation of contaminants; and environmental sciences. Lately, he has focused on greener approaches to assemble nanophotocatalysts and sustainable applications of magnetically retrievable nanophotocatalysts in benign media.

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