Author Archive

Gold intermediate found in green synthesis

A gold ketenylidene species (Au2=C=C=O) has been identified as a key intermediate in the partial oxidation of acetic acid over a gold/TiO2 catalyst – a reaction that could have important consequences for environmentally friendly organic synthesis. Gold and TiO2 both play a part in the catalysis, with C–H bond scission occurring at the former and C–O scission at the latter.

Such reactions could represent important routes to the de-oxygenation of acids and esters derived from bio-renewable intermediates, and hence the green manufacture of important bulk chemicals.

Read this fascinating Faraday Discussions article today:

Mechanistic insights into the partial oxidation of acetic acid by O2 at the dual perimeter sites of a Au/TiO2 catalyst
Matthew Neurock, Isabel Xiaoye Green, Wenjie Tang and John Yates
DOI: 10.1039/C3FD00002H

This exciting work will be discussed FD162: Fabrication, Structure and Reactivity of Anchored Nanoparticles.

Registration for this exciting event closes on Friday 15th March so hurry to secure your place!

Register now

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Faraday Discussions most-read articles in 2012

Image of Michael Faraday giving a lectureWe are pleased to present the most read articles in Faraday Discussions in 2012.

Attending a Faraday Discussion is a unique opportunity to discuss your work with leading researchers in important areas of physical chemistry, biophysical chemistry and chemical physics. Faraday Discussions are a unique and high-impact series of international conferences. Each Discussion is on a specific “hot topic”, and 24 papers are presented and discussed by world class speakers. The 24 papers and discussion (including new research presented by any delegate) are published in the Faraday Discussions journal.

The journal is SCI indexed, and the latest Impact Factor is 5.0.

Join us in 2013 for some excellent discussions: http://rsc.li/fd-upcoming-meetings.

Sign up to receive our free table-of-contents e-alert when each new volume goes online.

Top 25 most-read Faraday Discussions articles for 2012

Realizing artificial photosynthesis
Devens Gust, Thomas A. Moore and Ana L. Moore
DOI: 10.1039/C1FD00110H

Ionic Liquids: Past, present and future
C. Austen Angell, Younes Ansari and Zuofeng Zhao
DOI: 10.1039/C1FD00112D

Artificial photosynthesis for solar fuels
Stenbjörn Styring
DOI: 10.1039/C1FD00113B

Electron transfer kinetics in water splitting dye-sensitized solar cells based on core–shell oxide electrodes
Seung-Hyun Anna Lee, Yixin Zhao, Emil A. Hernandez-Pagan, Landy Blasdel, W. Justin Youngblood and Thomas E. Mallouk
DOI: 10.1039/C1FD00083G

Excitons and charges at organic semiconductor heterojunctions
Richard H. Friend, Matthew Phillips, Akshay Rao, Mark W. B. Wilson, Zhe Li and Christopher R. McNeill
DOI: 10.1039/C1FD00104C

Graphene-based supercapacitors in the parallel-plate electrode configuration: Ionic liquids versus organic electrolytes
Youngseon Shim, Hyung J. Kim and YounJoon Jung
DOI: 10.1039/C1FD00086A

Hydrogen evolution on nano-particulate transition metal sulfides
Jacob Bonde, Poul G. Moses, Thomas F. Jaramillo, Jens K. Nørskov and Ib Chorkendorff
DOI: 10.1039/B803857K

Development of highly efficient supramolecular CO2 reduction photocatalysts with high turnover frequency and durability
Yusuke Tamaki, Katsuhiro Watanabe, Kazuhide Koike, Haruo Inoue, Tatsuki Morimoto and Osamu Ishitani
DOI: 10.1039/C1FD00091H

Design principles of photosynthetic light-harvesting
Graham R. Fleming, Gabriela S. Schlau-Cohen, Kapil Amarnath and Julia Zaks
DOI: 10.1039/C1FD00078K

Artificial leaf device for solar fuel production
Yutaka Amao, Naho Shuto, Kana Furuno, Asami Obata, Yoshiko Fuchino, Keiko Uemura, Tsutomu Kajino, Takeshi Sekito, Satoshi Iwai, Yasushi Miyamoto and Masatoshi Matsuda
DOI: 10.1039/C1FD00097G

Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy: new materials, concepts, characterization tools, and applications
Jon A. Dieringer, Adam D. McFarland, Nilam C. Shah, Douglas A. Stuart, Alyson V. Whitney, Chanda R. Yonzon, Matthew A. Young, Xiaoyu Zhang and Richard P. Van Duyne
DOI: 10.1039/B513431P

Physical constraints on charge transport through bacterial nanowires
Nicholas F. Polizzi, Spiros S. Skourtis and David N. Beratan
DOI: 10.1039/C1FD00098E

A Ga2O3 underlayer as an isomorphic template for ultrathin hematite films toward efficient photoelectrochemical water splitting
Takashi Hisatomi, Jérémie Brillet, Maurin Cornuz, Florian Le Formal, Nicolas Tétreault, Kevin Sivula and Michael Grätzel
DOI: 10.1039/C1FD00103E

Micro-convection, dissipative structure and pattern formation in polymer blend solutions under temperature gradients
Takeshi Nambu, Yuji Yamauchi, Takahiro Kushiro and Shinichi Sakurai
DOI: 10.1039/B403108C

Light-driven water oxidation with a molecular tetra-cobalt(III) cubane cluster
Giuseppina La Ganga, Fausto Puntoriero, Sebastiano Campagna, Irene Bazzan, Serena Berardi, Marcella Bonchio, Andrea Sartorel, Mirco Natali and Franco Scandola
DOI: 10.1039/C1FD00093D

Kinetics of light-driven oxygen evolution at α-Fe2O3 electrodes
Laurence M. Peter, K. G. Upul Wijayantha and Asif A. Tahir
DOI: 10.1039/C1FD00079A

The interface ionic liquid(s)/electrode(s): In situ STM and AFM measurements
Frank Endres, Natalia Borisenko, Sherif Zein El Abedin, Robert Hayes and Rob Atkin
DOI: 10.1039/C1FD00050K

Copper dioxygen (bio)inorganic chemistry
Edward I. Solomon, Jake W. Ginsbach, David E. Heppner, Matthew T. Kieber-Emmons, Christian H. Kjaergaard, Pieter J. Smeets, Li Tian and Julia S. Woertink
DOI: 10.1039/C005500J

Simultaneous frequency and dissipation factor QCM measurements of biomolecular adsorption and cell adhesion
Michael Rodahl, Fredrik Höök, Claes Fredriksson, Craig A. Keller, Anatol Krozer, Peter Brzezinski, Marina Voinova and Bengt Kasemo
DOI: 10.1039/A703137H

Accumulative electron transfer: Multiple charge separation in artificial photosynthesis

Susanne Karlsson, Julien Boixel, Yann Pellegrin, Errol Blart, Hans-Christian Becker, Fabrice Odobel and Leif Hammarström
DOI: 10.1039/C1FD00089F

Colloidal metal oxide particles loaded with synthetic catalysts for solar H2 production
Fezile Lakadamyali, Masaru Kato and Erwin Reisner
DOI: 10.1039/C1FD00077B

Nanoparticle catalysts with high energy surfaces and enhanced activity synthesized by electrochemical method
Zhi-You Zhou, Na Tian, Zhi-Zhong Huang, De-Jun Chen and Shi-Gang Sun
DOI: 10.1039/B803716G

Gold nanoparticle-polymer/biopolymer complexes for protein sensing
Daniel F. Moyano, Subinoy Rana, Uwe H. F. Bunz and Vincent M. Rotello
DOI: 10.1039/C1FD00024A

A novel self-healing supramolecular polymer system
Stefano Burattini, Howard M. Colquhoun, Barnaby W. Greenland and Wayne Hayes
DOI: 10.1039/B900859D

Bio-tribology
Duncan Dowson
DOI: 10.1039/C2FD20103H

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Filming the motions of individual lipids

Image of observation area, lipid bilayer and cover glassSuper resolution microscopy breaks the diffraction limit. Professor Dr Stefan Hell is credited for the development of STED or stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper arising from the Faraday Discussion on Lipids & Membrane Biophysics STED is used in combination with FCS or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to follow the diffusion of dye labeled lipids in membrane model systems on glass and mica.

Super resolution microscopy is used to study the diffusion of labelled lipids, two labels are employed, one that localises in the liquid ordered and one that localises in the liquid disordered phase of the lipid membrane model. Through STED, and with the two new probes introduced, the rate of 2D diffusion in the membrane can be measured. As the localisation of the two probes is different, a map of the disordered and ordered domains can be generated.

by Dr Thomas Just Sørensen

Read this fascinating article which was presented as part of the Faraday Discussion on Lipids & Membrane Biophysics:

STED microscopy detects and quantifies liquid phase separation in lipid membranes using a new far-red emitting fluorescent phosphoglycerolipid analogue
Alf Honigmann, Veronika Mueller, Stefan W. Hell and Christian Eggeling
DOI: 10.1039/C2FD20107K

Read all the results and Discussion in the Lipids & Membrane Biophysics Discussion volume.

We’d love you to join us at a future meeting: more details on the Faraday Discussions events website.

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Register now for FD162: Fabrication, Structure and Reactivity of Anchored Nanoparticles

We’d love you to join us for FD162: Fabrication, Structure and Reactivity of Anchored Nanoparticles which will take place in Berlin, Germany from 10-12 April 2013.

Register now

Check out the programme on the website – highlights include Gabor Somorjai (University of California at Berkeley) and Charlie Campbell (University of Washington Seattle) giving the opening and closing lectures.

Faraday Discussions are a unique and high-impact series of international conferences. Each Faraday Discussion is on a specific “hot topic”, and 24 papers are presented and discussed by world class speakers.

The 24 papers and discussion (including new research presented by any delegate) are published in the Faraday Discussions journal. The journal is SCI indexed, and the latest Impact Factor (IF) is 5.0

Attending a Faraday Discussion is a unique opportunity to discuss your work with leading researchers in important areas of physical chemistry, biophysical chemistry and chemical physics.

We hope to see you there! Register to attend by 15th March 2013.

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Ion Specific Hofmeister Effects: FD160

Figure reproduced from the Introductory Lecture of FD160 (DOI: 10.1039/C2FD20128C)

Figure reproduced from the Introductory Lecture of FD160 (DOI: 10.1039/C2FD20128C)

If you take two glasses of water and dissolve sodium chloride in the one and sodium iodide in the other, I can tell you that in the first glass you have a deficiency of anions in the water-air interface and an accumulation of negative ions in the same interface in the latter glass. I can also tell you that if you dip a glass stirrer into one glass it will become negatively charged, where it in the other will get a positively charged. The last piece of wonder I can share is that if you use a plastic spoon instead the effects are reversed.

The examples I gave above are all examples of Hofmeister effects, where the nature of a small ion dictates specific events to occur in larger systems. The example with iodide and chloride are not the most extreme and the effects described above are small. The extreme cases include sulphate, perchlorate and hexafluorophosphate, the former is extremely hydrophilic and the two other are very lipophilic. Cations are an altogether different story all-together.

The importance of the Hofmeister effects are not to be underestimated as all biological processes and structures have to exist in ion-rich environments. Strip away the ions or introduce large quantities of an alien small ion and the processes and structures are disrupted. Killing an organism by introducing potassium is an easy experiment. Understanding the effects of chloride, bromide and sodium on every single piece of the biological machinery is much more challenging. The challenge is being met by the group of researchers who attended the 160th Faraday Discussion on Ion Specific Hofmeister Effects. Their latest findings and a thorough introduction to the subject is published in the recent issue of Faraday Discussions.

Much, much more information and many insights can be gleaned in the themes issue of Faraday Discussion on Ion Specific Hofmeister Effects.

by Dr Thomas Just Sørensen

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HOT article on surface interactions of gold to be discussed at FD162 – Register to join us

Japanese scientists have reported their work on the interactions of gold species on titania in a Faraday Discussions Accepted Manuscript. They found that the Au-anion interaction is mainly responsible for stabilising Au atoms on a thiol modified titania surface, while only Au55 clusters were found on a bare titania surface.

This is important in developing an understanding of how such systems behave during catalytic reactions, and suggests that surface modification may be a useful method for controlling the Au species on titania.

This paper will be among those discussed at the upcoming Faraday Discussion 162: Fabrication, Structure and Reactivity of Anchored Nanoparticles in Berlin.

Registration for this exciting is event is now open.

All delegates will have the opportunity to present their views on the Discussion papers and their own new research. All the presented papers and the discussion will be published together in the Faraday Discussion volume. The latest Impact Factor is 5.0.

Register today to attend Faraday Discussion 162: Fabrication, Structure and Reactivity of Anchored Nanoparticles.

Read this hot discussion paper in full:

Preparation and structure of a single Au atom on the TiO2(110) surface: Control of the Au-metal oxide surface interaction
Kiyotaka Asakura, Satoru Takakusagi, Hiroko Ariga, Wang-Jae Chun, Shushi Suzuki, Yuichiro Koike, Hiromitsu Uehara, Kotaro Miyazaki and Yasuhiro Iwasawa
DOI: 10.1039/C2FD20131C

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Self-Assembly of Biopolymers – FD166

Self-Assembly of Biopolymers: Faraday Discussion 166
16 – 18 September 2013, University of Bristol, UK

This is a busy time of year for you – and also for us! But we plan to have the review of abstract submissions completed in January. You may have given up on the idea of submitting because of lack of time, so we thought it only fair to give you some extra in view of this busy period and the forthcoming holiday.

Get your oral presentation abstract to us when we resume normal working in January and you will be in with a chance of being part of a high profile forum for this exciting new field.

Remember that it’s a great way to get your own research better known. Faraday Discussions have a unique format – papers are circulated in advance, and all discussion contributions, including any slides presented by delegates, are recorded for publication in a future Faraday Discussion volume.

Submit your oral abstract for FD166 as soon as you can.

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Mesostructure and Dynamics in Liquids and Solutions: FD167 – Call for oral abstracts

Mesostructure and Dynamics in Liquids and Solutions: Faraday Discussion 167 18-20 September 2013 University of Bristol, UK

Oral abstracts deadline – 23 November 2012

We invite you to join us for Mesostructure and Dynamics in Liquids and Solutions: Faraday Discussion 167 which will cover:

  • Mesoscopic structure in pure liquids
  • Structure around solutes and in mixtures
  • Crystal nucleation
  • Liquid-liquid phase transitions
  • Structure near interfaces

Submit your abstract today via our new submission system. You can find more details about submitting your abstract here.
Submit now
Confirmed speakers:

  • Hajime Tanaka (Introductory),University of  Tokyo, Japan
  • Austen Angell (Closing), Arizona State University, USA
  • Alessandro Triolo, Istituto Struttura della Materia, Italy
  • Jean-Louis Barrat, Universite Joseph Fourier, France
  • David Chandler, University of California Berkeley, USA
  • Pablo Debenedetti, Princeton University, USA
  • Karen Edler, University of Bath, UK
  • Valeria Molinero, University of Utah, USA
  • Michel Orrit, University of Leiden, The Netherlands
  • Greg Voth, University of Chicago, USA

Faraday Discussions are a long-established series of meetings which provide a unique international platform for the exchange of views and newly acquired results in developing areas of physical chemistry, biophysical chemistry and chemical physics.

All the presented papers and the discussion, including new research presented by any delegate, are published together in the Faraday Discussion volume. The latest Impact Factor is 5.0.


PCCP journal cover imagePhysical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP) is a sister journal to Faraday Discussions. PCCP brings you content of the highest quality in physical chemistry, chemical physics and biophysical chemistry.

We invite you to submit your research to PCCP today.
Recent articles from PCCP in this area include:

Simulating water with rigid non-polarizable models: a general perspective
Carlos Vega and Jose L. F. Abascal
DOI: 10.1039/C1CP22168J

On the different roles of anions and cations in the solvation of enzymes in ionic liquids
Marco Klähn, Geraldine S. Lim, Abirami Seduraman and Ping Wu
DOI: 10.1039/C0CP01509A

Depolarization of water in protic ionic liquids
Stefan Zahn, Katharina Wendler, Luigi Delle Site and Barbara Kirchner
DOI: 10.1039/C1CP20288J

The importance of ion size and electrode curvature on electrical double layers in ionic liquids
Guang Feng, Rui Qiao, Jingsong Huang, Sheng Dai, Bobby G. Sumpter and Vincent Meunier
DOI: 10.1039/C0CP02077J

Check out our recent PCCP themed issues on Physics and chemistry of ice and water and Interfaces of Ionic Liquids.

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FD159: Crystallisation – A Biological Perspective now published

We are pleased to announce the publication of Faraday Discussion 159 on Crystallisation – A Biological Perspective

Journal cover imageTake a look at the volume today

In the volume you can find all the papers and exciting discussion from the conference held in Leeds Metropolitan University, UK in September 2012. You can read more about what went on in our previous post.

Highlights in this volume include:

The Spiers Memorial lecture given by Daan Frenkel:
Effect of interaction specificity on the phase behaviour of patchy particles
Nicolas Dorsaz, Laura Filion, Frank Smallenburg and Daan Frenkel
DOI: 10.1039/C2FD20070H

A metastable liquid precursor phase of calcium carbonate and its interactions with polyaspartate
Mark A. Bewernitz, Denis Gebauer, Joanna Long, Helmut Cölfen and Laurie B. Gower
DOI: 10.1039/C2FD20080E

The thermodynamics of calcite nucleation at organic interfaces: Classical vs. non-classical pathways
Q. Hu, M. H. Nielsen, C. L. Freeman, L. M. Hamm, J. Tao, J. R. I. Lee, T. Y. J. Han, U. Becker, J. H. Harding, P. M. Dove and J. J. De Yoreo
DOI: 10.1039/C2FD20124K

Faraday Discussions documents a long-established series of meetings which provide a unique international platform for the exchange of views and newly acquired results in developing areas of physical chemistry and its boundaries with other areas of science. The latest Impact Factor is 5.0.

Don’t miss out – find out more and take a look at future Faraday Discussions.
______________________________________________________________________________________________

PCCP journal cover imageAlso check out the latest research in some of Faraday Discussions sister journals…

Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP):

The structure, thermal properties and phase transformations of the cubic polymorph of magnesium tetrahydroborate
W. I. F. David, S. K. Callear, M. O. Jones, P. C. Aeberhard, S. D. Culligan, A. H. Pohl, S. R. Johnson, K. R. Ryan, J. E. Parker, P. P. Edwards, C. J. Nuttall and A. Amieiro-Fonseca
DOI: 10.1039/C2CP23439D

Pressure amorphized ices – an atomistic perspective
John S. Tse and Dennis D. Klug
DOI: 10.1039/C2CP40201G

Functional noble metal nanoparticle superlattices grown at interfaces
Keisaku Kimura and Thalappil Pradeep
DOI: 10.1039/C1CP22279A

Nanoscale journal cover imageNanoscale:

Colloidal graphenes as heterogeneous additives to enhance protein crystal yield
Benjamin S. Gully, Jianli Zou, Gemma Cadby, Daniel M. Passon, K. Swaminathan Iyer and Charles S. Bond
DOI: 10.1039/C2NR31150J

The kinetics and mechanisms of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) crystallization to calcite, via vaterite
Juan Diego Rodriguez-Blanco , Samuel Shaw and Liane G. Benning
DOI: 10.1039/C0NR00589D

In situ TEM observation of lithium nanoparticle growth and morphological cycling
Jay Ghatak, Wei Guan and Günter Möbus
DOI: 10.1039/C2NR11546H

Browse the Nanoscale themed issue on Crystallization and Formation Mechanisms of Nanostructures, Guest Edited by Fiona Meldrum and Helmut Cölfen.

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FD166: Self-Assembly of Biopolymers – call for oral abstracts

Faraday Discussion 166 Self-Assembly of Biopolymers 16-18 September 2013 University of Bristol, UK

Call for oral abstracts deadline – 23 November 2012

We invite you to join us for Self-assembly of Biopolymers: Faraday Discussion 166 which will cover:
• Self-assembly of polymer/protein conjugates or polymer/virus conjugates
• DNA condensation using polyelectrolytes
• Self-assembly of polymersomes
• Self-assembly of carbohydrate/glyco polymer hybrid materials

Submit your abstract today via our new submission system.
You can find more details about submitting your abstract here.

Confirmed speakers:

Professor Samuel Stupp (Introductory), Northwestern University, USA
Professor Cameron Alexander (Closing), University of Nottingham, UK
Professor Carlos Aleman, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Spain
Professor Dr Hans Boerner, Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany
Professor Jeroen Cornelissen, University of Twente, The Netherlands
Professor Mustafa Guler, Bilkent University, Turkey
Professor Jeff Hartgerink, Rice University, USA
Professor Sebastien Lecommandoux, Institut Polytechnique de Bordeaux, France
Professor Raffaele Mezzenga, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
Professor Maite Paternostre, Institut de Biologie et de Technologies de Saclay, France
Professor Cyrus Safinya, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA

Faraday Discussions are a long-established series of meetings which provide a unique international platform for the exchange of views and newly acquired results in developing areas of physical chemistry, biophysical chemistry and chemical physics.

All the presented papers and the discussion, including new research presented by any delegate, are published together in the Faraday Discussion volume. The latest Impact Factor is 5.0.

PCCP journal cover imagePhysical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP) is a sister journals to Faraday Discussions. PCCP brings you content of the highest quality in physical chemistry, chemical physics and biophysical chemistry.

Recent articles from PCCP in this area include:

Nanostructured polymer assemblies formed at interfaces: applications from immobilization and encapsulation to stimuli-responsive release
Yajun Wang, Leticia Hosta-Rigau, Hannah Lomas and Frank Caruso
DOI: 10.1039/C0CP02287J

Rheo-attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy: a new tool to study biopolymers
Maxime Boulet-Audet, Fritz Vollrath and Chris Holland
DOI: 10.1039/C0CP02599B

Hierarchical superstructure of alkylamine-coated ZnS nanoparticle assemblies
Nataly Belman , Jacob N. Israelachvili , Youli Li , Cyrus R. Safinya , Vladimir Ezersky , Alexander Rabkin , Olga Sima and Yuval Golan
DOI: 10.1039/C0CP00999G

BaCO3 mesocrystals: new morphologies using peptide–polymer conjugates as crystallization modifiers
Tongxin Wang, James Mitchell, Hans Börner, Helmut Cölfen and Markus Antonietti
DOI: 10.1039/C0CP00819B

Check out our recent PCCP themed issues in this area:
Materials innovation through interfacial physics and chemistry
Nano-bio: The interface between bio-systems and nano-devices

You may also be interested in these other RSC Publishing journals: Soft Matter, Polymer Chemistry, and new journal Biomaterials Science which is currently free to access.

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