Archive for the ‘Themed Collections’ Category

UV AOPs: Themed Issue

Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology seeks your high-impact research for our upcoming Themed Issue on Ultraviolet-based Advanced Oxidation Processes (UV AOPs)

Guest Edited by Dion Dionysiou (University of Cincinnati, USA), Graham Gagnon (Dalhousie University, Canada), Stuart Khan (University of New South Wales, Australia) and Mike Templeton (Imperial College London, UK), this issue will showcase original research, perspectives, and reviews, relating to the following aspects of UV AOPs:

    • By-products, kinetics, and toxicity (e.g. mutagenicity, cytotoxicity) of UV AOP treatment of natural organic matter and micro-pollutants (e.g. pesticides, pharmaceuticals)
    • Topics on UV AOPs that use light-emitting diodes (LED) and/or other alternative UV sources besides mercury lamps are particularly encouraged
    • Comparisons of alternative UV AOP oxidants/processes (e.g. hydrogen peroxide, titanium dioxide, other emerging photocatalysts, chlorine, ozone, others)
    • The impact of pre-treatment steps on UV AOP performance
    • UV AOP fluence measurement; UV-LED-AOP measurement and performance monitoring during operation
    • Novel UV AOP reactor design and application of functionality
    • Life cycle assessments of UV AOPs
    • The impact of changing water matrices on UV AOP performance (e.g. different natural organic matter types, alkalinity)
    • UV AOP applications for wastewater treatment and water reuse
    • Modeling, scale up, process integration, and pilot/full scale performance evaluation of UV AOPs
    • Role of UV AOPs in water-energy-food nexus applications
    • Submissions that simply report the effectiveness of UV AOPs at degrading a particular target compound or set of compounds in pure lab-grade waters will not be considered.

Submissions for this Themed Issue are due by March 2018 – if you would like to submit to this Themed Issue, please contact the Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology Editorial Office at eswater-rsc@rsc.org to register your interest.

Guest Editors: Left to Right – Dion Dionysiou (University of Cincinnati, USA), Graham Gagnon (Dalhousie University, Canada), Stuart Khan (University of New South Wales, Australia) and Mike Templeton (Imperial College London, UK)

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What are your colleagues reading in Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology?

The articles below are some of the most read Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology articles in 2016. You can view the full collection of our top 10 downloaded articles here.

 

Membrane materials for water purification: design, development, and application
Anna Lee, Jeffrey W. Elam and Seth B. Darling

 

Inorganic engineered nanoparticles in drinking water treatment: a critical review
Konstantinos Simeonidis, Stefanos Mourdikoudis, Efthimia Kaprara, Manassis Mitrakas and Lakshminarayana Polavarapu

 

Survey of green building water systems reveals elevated water age and water quality concerns
William J. Rhoads, Amy Pruden and Marc A. Edwards

 

Characterising and understanding the impact of microbial biofilms and the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix in drinking water distribution systems
Katherine E. Fish, A. Mark Osborn and Joby Boxall

 

Inactivation of bacteria from contaminated streams in Limpopo, South Africa by silver- or copper-nanoparticle paper filters
Theresa A. Dankovich, Jonathan S. Levine, Natasha Potgieter, Rebecca Dillingham and James A. Smith

 

Keep up-to-date with the latest issues of Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology by joining our e-alerts.

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Brine Mining Nexus Themed Issue

Are you currently developing new techniques or novel materials to treat saline water for brine management or resource recovery?

If so, you are encouraged to submit a paper to a themed issue of Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology dedicated to Brine Mining Nexus.

Brine or concentrate management offers both the challenge of saline wastewater disposal and the opportunity to recover valuable minerals. Successful integration of brine management techniques and other processes can open up new horizons for water and wastewater treatment, but will require complementary and innovative development in both process engineering and materials science.

Guest Editors of this themed issue Long Nghiem (University of Wollongong, Australia), Enrico Drioli (Università della Calabria), Tzahi Cath (Colorado School of Mines), and Tao He (Shanghai Advanced Research Institute) are soliciting submissions highlighting research that covers the diverse array of research topics in process engineering and materials science specifically towards the development or further improvement of brine management technologies, such as:

  • Proof-of-concept and pilot demonstration of brine treatment technologies
  • Scaling control and prevention
  • Salt recovery via crystallisation
  • Brine valorisation without crystallisation
  • Novel membrane or ion exchange materials for brine management
  • Non-corrosive materials development
  • Low grade energy utilisation for brine management

Submit your paper by 30th September 2016

We welcome original research papers, communications, perspectives, and review articles.

For more information on the scope of Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology and our author guidelines, please visit our website or email us at eswater-rsc@rsc.org.

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Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology team select their top papers from 2015!

2015 has been a successful first year for Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology – we have published an array of high-impact research and review articles from both leaders and emerging scientists in the field of water research. The major highlights from 2015 have been captured by Editor-in-Chief Professor David Cwiertny in his recent Editorial.

As a celebration of a successful first year of publication, the Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology team have selected their top papers from 2015, listed below. Congratulations to all the authors featured! These papers free to access with an RSC Publishing account – we hope you enjoy reading them.

Triclosan, chlorinated triclosan derivatives, and hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-BDEs) in wastewater effluents
R. Noah Hensley, Jill F. Kerrigan, Hao Pang, Paul R. Erickson, Matthew Grandbois, Kristopher McNeill and William A. Arnold, Environ. Sci.: Water Res. Technol., 2015, 1, 316–325, DOI: 10.1039/C4EW00102H

Emerging investigators series: the source and fate of pandemic viruses in the urban water cycle
K. R. Wigginton, Y. Ye and R. M. Ellenberg, Environ. Sci.: Water Res. Technol., 2015, 1, 735–746, DOI: 10.1039/C5EW00125K

Modeling approaches to predict removal of trace organic compounds by ozone oxidation in potable reuse applications
Minkyu Park, Tarun Anumol and Shane A. Snyder, Environ. Sci.: Water Res. Technol., 2015, 1, 699–708, DOI: 10.1039/C5EW00120J

Some of our other highlights from 2015 include:

All content published in Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology in 2015 and 2016 is free to access with an RSC Publishing account – register for free here: http://pubs.rsc.org/en/account/register

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International Water Reuse and Desalination Symposium

A two-day International Water Reuse & Desalination Symposium focused on climate resilient water solutions was held in Brisbane, Australia on the 4th and 5th of November.

This specialty conference was focused on practical aspects of water reuse and desalination, as well as relevant research being conducted in the US and Australia, and featured a blue ribbon assemblage of world-class experts on these two vital components of the water supply equation.

The picture shows Stuart Khan (on the right) presenting the Potable Reuse of Water collection

Editorial Board member and Associate Editor Stuart Khan attended this meeting and took this opportunity to present the Potable Reuse of Water collection included in issue 5 of Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology.

“The delegates understood and appreciated that the focus of our journal is specifically targeted toward engineered systems. That focus makes it considerably more specialised than most of the other water research journals in the field.”

Stuart Khan, Associate Editor

The symposium was a success and the themed collection was very well received. Dedicated to recent advances associated with the potable reuse of water, issue 5 includes a comprehensive collection of papers highlighting research technology and engineering development at the leading edge of potable water reuse.

“There was a lot of interest from the conference participants in our journal. A number of them were authors of the papers presented in this potable reuse of water issue, and others had already submitted papers to our regular issues. The fact that the themed issue was so precisely targeted to one of the key conference themes was particularly appreciated, and all complimentary copies were eagerly snapped up,” Stuart added.

The issue to combine a variety of topics relevant to potable reuse of water. This includes but is not limited to technical innovations, human health risk assessments, monitoring strategies, sustainability assessments and novel applications.

Why not read the full collection now?

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Emerging Investigators Series – Open Call for Applications

We are delighted to announce a new initiative in which we wish to highlight the very best work from environmental scientists, working in the area of water engineering and technology, who are in the early stages of their independent career. Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology has created an on-going Emerging Investigators Series that will feature articles published by up-and-coming researchers who have been identified as having the potential to influence future directions in water research and technology.

Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology showcases high quality research and innovative technologies that promote sustainable water resources. The journal provides a comprehensive and relevant forum that unites the diverse communities and disciplines conducting water research relevant to engineered systems and the built environment.

This is an open call for applications to the Series. Environmental scientists who have completed their PhD (or equivalent degree) within the last 10 years, and have an independent career, can apply to have their research highlighted in the Emerging Investigators Series.

To make an application please email eswater-rsc@rsc.org with the following information:

  • Your name, affiliation, position and contact details
  • Your up-to-date CV (no longer than 2 pages), which should include a summary of education and career, a list of relevant publications, any notable awards, honours or professional activities in the field, and a website URL if relevant
  • A synopsis of the article intended to be submitted to the Series, including a tentative submission date. This can be an original research article (Communication or Full Paper) or a review-type article (Critical Review, Frontier Review or Tutorial Review). Please see the journal website for more information on our article types.

Applications will be reviewed by the Executive Editor, Editor-in-Chief and members of the Editorial Board. The selection criteria for the Emerging Investigators Series will be based on the following:

  • Innovation and impact of research program
  • Quality of publications and/or patents and/or software
  • Profile within institute and/or community

Please note that articles submitted to the journal for the Series will undergo the usual peer-review process, and no guarantees of publication can be given to successful applicants.

In return, successful applicants will receive additional visibility of their research through the inclusion of their article in a high profile themed collection on the journal website, a feature interview on the journal blog devoted to the investigator’s research program (read the latest interviews here), and the offer of discounted membership to the Royal Society of Chemistry, at an appropriate level of membership, for the first year.

Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology authors also benefit from rapid publication times, a simple and user-friendly online submission process and all articles are in colour, free of charge.

Contact and further information
Sarah Ruthven, Executive Editor
Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology
Royal Society of Chemistry
Thomas Graham House, Science Park,
Milton Road, Cambridge, CB4 0WF, UK
Tel: +44 (0) 1223 432129
Email: eswater-rsc@rsc.org

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Drinking Water Exposome Themed Issue

Are you currently doing research examining the complexities of drinking water chemistry and microbiology at the interface of water quality and human health?

If so, you are encouraged to submit a paper to a themed issue of Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology dedicated to the Drinking Water Exposome.

The Exposome has recently been defined as the environmental exposure complement to the genome. In this themed issue we utilise this construct to consider chemical and microbial exposures that can occur via consumption or use of drinking water.

Editorial Board member Peter Vikesland (Virginia Tech, USA) and Lutgarde Raskin (University of Michigan, USA), Guest Editors of this themed issue, are soliciting submissions highlighting research that covers the diverse array of research topics that are encompassed by drinking water chemistry and microbiology at the interface of water quality and human health:

–       Unintended consequences of disinfectant switching practices
–       Distribution system and premise plumbing corrosion
–       Dissemination of antimicrobial resistance organisms via drinking water
–       Nutrient and carbon cycling within drinking water systems
–       Drinking water disinfectant fate and reactivity
–       Innovative treatment technologies to mitigate exposure
–       Opportunistic pathogens in drinking water systems

Submit your paper by 10th January 2016!

We welcome original research papers, communications and Review articles.

For more information on the scope of Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology and our author guidelines, please visit our website or email us at eswater-rsc@rsc.org.

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Sanitation Themed Collection

The Editorial Board of Environmental Science: Water Research and Technology is encouraging submissions in the area of sanitation research.


Accepted articles on this topic will be gathered in an online themed collection to be highlighted on the journal website. Submissions on research in the following areas are welcome:

  • Novel onsite sanitation technologies
  • Sanitation solutions for areas with high water tables
  • Sanitation for emergency relief situations
  • Faecal sludge properties, emptying methods, and treatment
  • Biogas recovery technologies at household or small community scales
  • Sanitation service models
  • The role of sanitation in improving health
  • Cost-benefit and sustainability assessments of sanitation options
  • Simplified sewerage and drainage
  • Urban sanitation challenges and large-scale solutions
  • We welcome original research articles, communications and review papers on these topics.


    Submit your paper by 31st December 2015!

    Prospective authors may wish to read Pitfalls and Progress: A Perspective on Achieving Sustainable Sanitation for All*’ by Dr Michael R. Templeton of Imperial College London and an Editorial Board member, which was published in the first issue of the journal.

    There are many benefits to publishing with us, including wide exposure to your publication, as all content published during 2015 & 2016 is free* to access.

    For more information on our scope and author guidelines, please visit our website or email us at eswater-rsc@rsc.org.


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    *Access is free through an RSC registered account.

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    Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology Special Issue

    Are you currently doing research in an area of potable water reuse?

    We are delighted to announce a special themed issue, dedicated to recent advances associated with the potable reuse of water, which will be published in 2015 in Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology.

    The Editor-in-Chief David. M Cwiertny, and Associate Editor Stuart Khan, are encouraging submissions highlighting research technology and engineering development at the leading edge of potable water reuse.

    This special issue will combine a variety of topic areas that are relevant to Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology. Submissions in the following areas are welcome:

    •           Technical innovations facilitating potable reuse

    •           Human health risk assessment of potable reuse

    •           The role and efficiency of environmental buffers in indirect potable reuse

    •           Monitoring strategies in potable water reuse systems

    •           Assessment and regulation of potable water reuse projects

    •           Public perception of direct and indirect potable reuse

    •           Sustainability assessment for potable reuse

    •           Technical challenges, particularly relating to direct potable reuse

    •           Novel applications of direct and indirect potable reuse

    Submit your Paper!

    We welcome original research papers, communications and Review articles.

    For more information on the scope of Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology and our author guidelines, please visit our website or email us at ESWater-rsc@rsc.org

    Submission Deadline: 15th February 2015

    We hope to receive a manuscript from you or your group soon!

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    Energy positive treatment for fracking water

    $5 billion (£3 billion) is the estimated annual cost for disposing of contaminated water produced during shale gas extraction. Now, researchers in the US have developed a new technology that could reduce the cost of dealing with this water by 30–40%.

    Reclaimed fracking fluid is a significant environmental impediment to the energy industry © FLPA / Alamy

    Hydraulic fracturing, the process used to extract oil and gas from underground rock formations, produces over 20 billion barrels of contaminated water every year. Current methods, such as underground injection, to dispose of these vast quantities of contaminated water have risks, including a chance of initiating earthquakes. Reuse of this water avoids disposal issues, but requires multiple treatment processes to remove contaminants such as salts and organic hydrocarbons.

    Zhiyong Jason Ren and colleagues from the University of Colorado Boulder have developed a technique that can simultaneously remove organic pollutants and salinity from contaminated water whilst producing energy. ‘The beauty of this technology is that it can replace five or six current processes with one to kill multiple birds with one stone,’ he says.

    To read the full article please visit Chemistry World.

    Congratulations to the team at CU-Boulder who were recently awarded first place in the National Science Foundation’s Innovation Corps Program for the development of this technology.

    With energy companies eager to test the technology in the field, Ren’s team is now working to scale up the process. You can access their full research paper, which is part of our Fracking in Perspective web collection for free* by clicking the link below.

    Environ. Sci.: Water Res. Technol., 2015, Advance Article
    DOI: 10.1039/C4EW00050A, Paper
    From themed collection Fracking in perspective

    *Access is free through a registered RSC account – click here to register.

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