Archive for the ‘Themed Collections’ Category

What are your colleagues reading in Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology?

The articles below are some of the most read Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology articles in 2016. You can view the full collection of our top 10 downloaded articles here.

 

Membrane materials for water purification: design, development, and application
Anna Lee, Jeffrey W. Elam and Seth B. Darling

 

Inorganic engineered nanoparticles in drinking water treatment: a critical review
Konstantinos Simeonidis, Stefanos Mourdikoudis, Efthimia Kaprara, Manassis Mitrakas and Lakshminarayana Polavarapu

 

Survey of green building water systems reveals elevated water age and water quality concerns
William J. Rhoads, Amy Pruden and Marc A. Edwards

 

Characterising and understanding the impact of microbial biofilms and the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix in drinking water distribution systems
Katherine E. Fish, A. Mark Osborn and Joby Boxall

 

Inactivation of bacteria from contaminated streams in Limpopo, South Africa by silver- or copper-nanoparticle paper filters
Theresa A. Dankovich, Jonathan S. Levine, Natasha Potgieter, Rebecca Dillingham and James A. Smith

 

Keep up-to-date with the latest issues of Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology by joining our e-alerts.

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Brine Mining Nexus Themed Issue

Are you currently developing new techniques or novel materials to treat saline water for brine management or resource recovery?

If so, you are encouraged to submit a paper to a themed issue of Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology dedicated to Brine Mining Nexus.

Brine or concentrate management offers both the challenge of saline wastewater disposal and the opportunity to recover valuable minerals. Successful integration of brine management techniques and other processes can open up new horizons for water and wastewater treatment, but will require complementary and innovative development in both process engineering and materials science.

Guest Editors of this themed issue Long Nghiem (University of Wollongong, Australia), Enrico Drioli (Università della Calabria), Tzahi Cath (Colorado School of Mines), and Tao He (Shanghai Advanced Research Institute) are soliciting submissions highlighting research that covers the diverse array of research topics in process engineering and materials science specifically towards the development or further improvement of brine management technologies, such as:

  • Proof-of-concept and pilot demonstration of brine treatment technologies
  • Scaling control and prevention
  • Salt recovery via crystallisation
  • Brine valorisation without crystallisation
  • Novel membrane or ion exchange materials for brine management
  • Non-corrosive materials development
  • Low grade energy utilisation for brine management

Submit your paper by 30th September 2016

We welcome original research papers, communications, perspectives, and review articles.

For more information on the scope of Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology and our author guidelines, please visit our website or email us at eswater-rsc@rsc.org.

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Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology team select their top papers from 2015!

2015 has been a successful first year for Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology – we have published an array of high-impact research and review articles from both leaders and emerging scientists in the field of water research. The major highlights from 2015 have been captured by Editor-in-Chief Professor David Cwiertny in his recent Editorial.

As a celebration of a successful first year of publication, the Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology team have selected their top papers from 2015, listed below. Congratulations to all the authors featured! These papers free to access with an RSC Publishing account – we hope you enjoy reading them.

Triclosan, chlorinated triclosan derivatives, and hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-BDEs) in wastewater effluents
R. Noah Hensley, Jill F. Kerrigan, Hao Pang, Paul R. Erickson, Matthew Grandbois, Kristopher McNeill and William A. Arnold, Environ. Sci.: Water Res. Technol., 2015, 1, 316–325, DOI: 10.1039/C4EW00102H

Emerging investigators series: the source and fate of pandemic viruses in the urban water cycle
K. R. Wigginton, Y. Ye and R. M. Ellenberg, Environ. Sci.: Water Res. Technol., 2015, 1, 735–746, DOI: 10.1039/C5EW00125K

Modeling approaches to predict removal of trace organic compounds by ozone oxidation in potable reuse applications
Minkyu Park, Tarun Anumol and Shane A. Snyder, Environ. Sci.: Water Res. Technol., 2015, 1, 699–708, DOI: 10.1039/C5EW00120J

Some of our other highlights from 2015 include:

All content published in Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology in 2015 and 2016 is free to access with an RSC Publishing account – register for free here: http://pubs.rsc.org/en/account/register

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International Water Reuse and Desalination Symposium

A two-day International Water Reuse & Desalination Symposium focused on climate resilient water solutions was held in Brisbane, Australia on the 4th and 5th of November.

This specialty conference was focused on practical aspects of water reuse and desalination, as well as relevant research being conducted in the US and Australia, and featured a blue ribbon assemblage of world-class experts on these two vital components of the water supply equation.

The picture shows Stuart Khan (on the right) presenting the Potable Reuse of Water collection

Editorial Board member and Associate Editor Stuart Khan attended this meeting and took this opportunity to present the Potable Reuse of Water collection included in issue 5 of Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology.

“The delegates understood and appreciated that the focus of our journal is specifically targeted toward engineered systems. That focus makes it considerably more specialised than most of the other water research journals in the field.”

Stuart Khan, Associate Editor

The symposium was a success and the themed collection was very well received. Dedicated to recent advances associated with the potable reuse of water, issue 5 includes a comprehensive collection of papers highlighting research technology and engineering development at the leading edge of potable water reuse.

“There was a lot of interest from the conference participants in our journal. A number of them were authors of the papers presented in this potable reuse of water issue, and others had already submitted papers to our regular issues. The fact that the themed issue was so precisely targeted to one of the key conference themes was particularly appreciated, and all complimentary copies were eagerly snapped up,” Stuart added.

The issue to combine a variety of topics relevant to potable reuse of water. This includes but is not limited to technical innovations, human health risk assessments, monitoring strategies, sustainability assessments and novel applications.

Why not read the full collection now?

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Emerging Investigators Series – Open Call for Applications

We are delighted to announce a new initiative in which we wish to highlight the very best work from environmental scientists, working in the area of water engineering and technology, who are in the early stages of their independent career. Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology has created an on-going Emerging Investigators Series that will feature articles published by up-and-coming researchers who have been identified as having the potential to influence future directions in water research and technology.

Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology showcases high quality research and innovative technologies that promote sustainable water resources. The journal provides a comprehensive and relevant forum that unites the diverse communities and disciplines conducting water research relevant to engineered systems and the built environment.

This is an open call for applications to the Series. Environmental scientists who have completed their PhD (or equivalent degree) within the last 10 years, and have an independent career, can apply to have their research highlighted in the Emerging Investigators Series.

To make an application please email eswater-rsc@rsc.org with the following information:

  • Your name, affiliation, position and contact details
  • Your up-to-date CV (no longer than 2 pages), which should include a summary of education and career, a list of relevant publications, any notable awards, honours or professional activities in the field, and a website URL if relevant
  • A synopsis of the article intended to be submitted to the Series, including a tentative submission date. This can be an original research article (Communication or Full Paper) or a review-type article (Critical Review, Frontier Review or Tutorial Review). Please see the journal website for more information on our article types.

Applications will be reviewed by the Executive Editor, Editor-in-Chief and members of the Editorial Board. The selection criteria for the Emerging Investigators Series will be based on the following:

  • Innovation and impact of research program
  • Quality of publications and/or patents and/or software
  • Profile within institute and/or community

Please note that articles submitted to the journal for the Series will undergo the usual peer-review process, and no guarantees of publication can be given to successful applicants.

In return, successful applicants will receive additional visibility of their research through the inclusion of their article in a high profile themed collection on the journal website, a feature interview on the journal blog devoted to the investigator’s research program (read the latest interviews here), and the offer of discounted membership to the Royal Society of Chemistry, at an appropriate level of membership, for the first year.

Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology authors also benefit from rapid publication times, a simple and user-friendly online submission process and all articles are in colour, free of charge.

Contact and further information
Sarah Ruthven, Executive Editor
Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology
Royal Society of Chemistry
Thomas Graham House, Science Park,
Milton Road, Cambridge, CB4 0WF, UK
Tel: +44 (0) 1223 432129
Email: eswater-rsc@rsc.org

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Drinking Water Exposome Themed Issue

Are you currently doing research examining the complexities of drinking water chemistry and microbiology at the interface of water quality and human health?

If so, you are encouraged to submit a paper to a themed issue of Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology dedicated to the Drinking Water Exposome.

The Exposome has recently been defined as the environmental exposure complement to the genome. In this themed issue we utilise this construct to consider chemical and microbial exposures that can occur via consumption or use of drinking water.

Editorial Board member Peter Vikesland (Virginia Tech, USA) and Lutgarde Raskin (University of Michigan, USA), Guest Editors of this themed issue, are soliciting submissions highlighting research that covers the diverse array of research topics that are encompassed by drinking water chemistry and microbiology at the interface of water quality and human health:

–       Unintended consequences of disinfectant switching practices
–       Distribution system and premise plumbing corrosion
–       Dissemination of antimicrobial resistance organisms via drinking water
–       Nutrient and carbon cycling within drinking water systems
–       Drinking water disinfectant fate and reactivity
–       Innovative treatment technologies to mitigate exposure
–       Opportunistic pathogens in drinking water systems

Submit your paper by 10th January 2016!

We welcome original research papers, communications and Review articles.

For more information on the scope of Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology and our author guidelines, please visit our website or email us at eswater-rsc@rsc.org.

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Sanitation Themed Collection

The Editorial Board of Environmental Science: Water Research and Technology is encouraging submissions in the area of sanitation research.


Accepted articles on this topic will be gathered in an online themed collection to be highlighted on the journal website. Submissions on research in the following areas are welcome:

  • Novel onsite sanitation technologies
  • Sanitation solutions for areas with high water tables
  • Sanitation for emergency relief situations
  • Faecal sludge properties, emptying methods, and treatment
  • Biogas recovery technologies at household or small community scales
  • Sanitation service models
  • The role of sanitation in improving health
  • Cost-benefit and sustainability assessments of sanitation options
  • Simplified sewerage and drainage
  • Urban sanitation challenges and large-scale solutions
  • We welcome original research articles, communications and review papers on these topics.


    Submit your paper by 31st December 2015!

    Prospective authors may wish to read Pitfalls and Progress: A Perspective on Achieving Sustainable Sanitation for All*’ by Dr Michael R. Templeton of Imperial College London and an Editorial Board member, which was published in the first issue of the journal.

    There are many benefits to publishing with us, including wide exposure to your publication, as all content published during 2015 & 2016 is free* to access.

    For more information on our scope and author guidelines, please visit our website or email us at eswater-rsc@rsc.org.


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    *Access is free through an RSC registered account.

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    Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology Special Issue

    Are you currently doing research in an area of potable water reuse?

    We are delighted to announce a special themed issue, dedicated to recent advances associated with the potable reuse of water, which will be published in 2015 in Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology.

    The Editor-in-Chief David. M Cwiertny, and Associate Editor Stuart Khan, are encouraging submissions highlighting research technology and engineering development at the leading edge of potable water reuse.

    This special issue will combine a variety of topic areas that are relevant to Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology. Submissions in the following areas are welcome:

    •           Technical innovations facilitating potable reuse

    •           Human health risk assessment of potable reuse

    •           The role and efficiency of environmental buffers in indirect potable reuse

    •           Monitoring strategies in potable water reuse systems

    •           Assessment and regulation of potable water reuse projects

    •           Public perception of direct and indirect potable reuse

    •           Sustainability assessment for potable reuse

    •           Technical challenges, particularly relating to direct potable reuse

    •           Novel applications of direct and indirect potable reuse

    Submit your Paper!

    We welcome original research papers, communications and Review articles.

    For more information on the scope of Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology and our author guidelines, please visit our website or email us at ESWater-rsc@rsc.org

    Submission Deadline: 15th February 2015

    We hope to receive a manuscript from you or your group soon!

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    Energy positive treatment for fracking water

    $5 billion (£3 billion) is the estimated annual cost for disposing of contaminated water produced during shale gas extraction. Now, researchers in the US have developed a new technology that could reduce the cost of dealing with this water by 30–40%.

    Reclaimed fracking fluid is a significant environmental impediment to the energy industry © FLPA / Alamy

    Hydraulic fracturing, the process used to extract oil and gas from underground rock formations, produces over 20 billion barrels of contaminated water every year. Current methods, such as underground injection, to dispose of these vast quantities of contaminated water have risks, including a chance of initiating earthquakes. Reuse of this water avoids disposal issues, but requires multiple treatment processes to remove contaminants such as salts and organic hydrocarbons.

    Zhiyong Jason Ren and colleagues from the University of Colorado Boulder have developed a technique that can simultaneously remove organic pollutants and salinity from contaminated water whilst producing energy. ‘The beauty of this technology is that it can replace five or six current processes with one to kill multiple birds with one stone,’ he says.

    To read the full article please visit Chemistry World.

    Congratulations to the team at CU-Boulder who were recently awarded first place in the National Science Foundation’s Innovation Corps Program for the development of this technology.

    With energy companies eager to test the technology in the field, Ren’s team is now working to scale up the process. You can access their full research paper, which is part of our Fracking in Perspective web collection for free* by clicking the link below.

    Environ. Sci.: Water Res. Technol., 2015, Advance Article
    DOI: 10.1039/C4EW00050A, Paper
    From themed collection Fracking in perspective

    *Access is free through a registered RSC account – click here to register.

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    Water in health and in the environment

    We are delighted to share with you a series of collections of recent books and articles on the topic of water.  These four collections – one per month – demonstrate different aspects of water: its chemistry, its wide use in reactions and as a solvent, its relationship with energy and sustainability, as well as with human health and the environment.

    Image (c) Shutterstock

    Here, in our fourth collection, we have assembled some of the ground breaking research and transformative reviews related to water in health and in the environment –highlighting the importance of water in our daily life – from across our journals.

    Water and energy are two of the most significant scientific and societal challenges we face in the 21st Century. This selection of papers attempts to give readers a comprehensive flavour of some of the environmental challenges we face associated with water, its portability, use and re-use through interdisciplinary research, new technologies, and sustainability issues. I hope that readers will find this selection of content to be valuable in their research and help resolve some of the challenges we face.

    Harp Minhas
    Executive Editor, Environment

    “This year, as the IPCC prepares to release the final contributions to their Fifth Assessment Report on climate change, it is timely to consider the role of chemistry in addressing global challenges, such as food, water, raw materials and energy,” remarks Professor Lesley Yellowlees, President of the Royal Society of Chemistry. “This collection from our journals shares the latest research from scientists around the world, aiming to tackle these challenges. Featuring original research and commentary by leaders in the field, we hope that you will find this high-quality collection engaging, inspirational and informative.”

    You can read all of these articles for free until 8th August 2014! We truly hope you enjoy this collection.

    We have already published our collections on the Chemistry of waterChemistry in water and Water and Energy.

    Did you know that the RSC has put togethera webpage on Water, which brings together information on activities for scientists, policymakers, educators and young people? Take a look today…

    We are also delighted to announce the launch of our newest journal

    Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology
    Resources, Security, Sustainability

    A broad spectrum journal dealing with all scientific water issues, technologies, engineering, resources, security and sustainability. Also covering societal issues and impacts. See the journal homepage for full details.

    “Water resources are at such a critical juncture in today’s society.  Climate change, the energy-water nexus, and water reuse and sustainability are all emerging themes that will impact current and future generations.  I believe Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology will be a tremendous platform for the presentation and discussion of the latest, cutting-edge research in these areas, while also representing an exciting new alternative for research in more traditional areas of water”

    David Cwiertny
    Editor-in-Chief, Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology

    Some books on water, health and the environment:

    Sustainable Water RemediationGreen Materials for Sustainable Water Remediation and Treatment
    Anuradha Mishra, James H Clark
    ISBN: 978-1-84973-621-3

    Water Contamination Emergencies
    Ulrich Borchers, John Gray, K Clive Thompson
    ISBN: 978-1-84973-441-7

    The Significance of Faecal Indicators in Water
    David Kay, C Fricker
    ISBN: 978-1-84973-169-0

    Handbook of Culture Media for Food and Water Microbiology
    Janet E L Corry, Gordon D W Curtis, R M Baird
    ISBN: 978-1-84755-916-6

    Water Contamination Emergencies
    K Clive Thompson, Ulrich Borchers
    ISBN: 978-1-84973-156-0

    The Water Framework Directive: Action Programmes and Adaptation to Climate ChangeDrinking Water
    Philippe Quevauviller, Ulrich Borchers, K Clive Thompson, Tristan Simonart
    ISBN: 978-1-84973-156-0

    Sustainable Water
    R E Hester, R M Harrison
    ISBN: 978-1-84973-019-8

    Basic Water Treatment: Edition 5
    Chris Binnie, Martin Kimber
    ISBN: 978-1-84973-974-0


    Reviews and Perspectives:

    Powering denitrification: the perspectives of electrocatalytic nitrate reduction
    Matteo Duca and Marc T. M. Koper
    Energy Environ. Sci., 2012,5, 9726-9742
    DOI: 10.1039/C2EE23062C, Perspective

    Exposure to multiple metals from groundwater—a global crisis: Geology, climate change, health effects, testing, and mitigation
    Erika Mitchell, Seth Frisbie and Bibudhendra Sarkar
    Metallomics, 2011, 3, 874-908
    DOI: 10.1039/C1MT00052G, Critical Review

    World Health Organization increases its drinking-water guideline for uranium<
    Seth H. Frisbie, Erika J. Mitchell and Bibudhendra Sarkar
    Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2013,15, 1817-1823
    DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00381G, Perspective

    Forward and pressure retarded osmosis: potential solutions for global challenges in energy and water supply
    Chalida Klaysom, Tazhi Y. Cath, Tom Depuydt and Ivo F. J. Vankelecom
    Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013,42, 6959-6989Engineered Osmosis
    DOI: 10.1039/C3CS60051C, Review Article

    Biofilms in drinking water: problems and solutions
    Lúcia Chaves Simões and Manuel Simões
    RSC Adv., 2013, 3, 2520-2533
    DOI: 10.1039/C2RA22243D, Review Article

    Mechanisms of lead and manganese neurotoxicity
    April P. Neal and Tomas R. Guilarte
    Toxicol. Res., 2013,2, 99-114
    DOI: 10.1039/C2TX20064C, Review Article

    Mechanisms and modifiers of methylmercury-induced neurotoxicity
    Stephanie J. B. Fretham, Samuel Caito, Ebany J. Martinez-Finley and Michael Aschner
    Toxicol. Res., 2012,1, 32-38
    DOI: 10.1039/C2TX20010D, Review Article

    Water-gated organic field effect transistors – opportunities for biochemical sensing and extracellular signal transduction
    T. Cramer, A. Campana, F. Leonardi, S. Casalini, A. Kyndiah, M. Murgia and F. Biscarini
    J. Mater. Chem. B, 2013,1, 3728-3741
    DOI:10.1039/C3TB20340A, Application

    Antimalarial peroxides: advances in drug discovery and design
    Rachel D. Slack, Alexander M. Jacobine and Gary H. Posner
    Med. Chem. Commun., 2012,3, 281-297
    DOI: 10.1039/C2MD00277A, Review Article
    From themed collection MedChemComm 2012 review articles

    Chemical treatment technologies for waste-water recycling—an overview
    Vinod Kumar Gupta, Imran Ali, Tawfik A. Saleh, Arunima Nayak and Shilpi Agarwal
    RSC Adv., 2012, 2, 6380-6388
    DOI:10.1039/C2RA20340E


    Original research articles:

    A luminescent-water soluble inorganic co-crystal for a selective pico-molar range arsenic(III) sensor in water medium
    Biswajit Dey, Rajat Saha and Priyanka Mukherjee
    Chem. Commun., 2013,49, 7064-7066
    DOI: 10.1039/C3CC43574A, Communication

    A Prototype Point-of-Use Assay for Measuring Heavy Metal Contamination in Water Using Time as a Quantitative Readout
    Gregory G Lewis, Jessica Sloane Robbins and Scott Phillips
    Chem. Commun., 2013, Accepted Manuscript
    DOI: 10.1039/C3CC47698G, Communication
    From themed collection 2014 Emerging Investigators

    Recognition of primary aminesRecognition of primary amines in water by a zinc funnel complex based on calix[6]arene
    Olivia Bistri, Benoit Colasson and Olivia Reinaud
    Chem. Sci., 2012,3, 811-818
    DOI: 10.1039/C1SC00738F, Edge Article

    Magnetically directed clean-up of underwater oil spills through a functionally integrated device
    Mengjiao Cheng, Guannan Ju, Chao Jiang, Yajun Zhang and Feng Shi
    J. Mater. Chem. A, 2013,1, 13411-13416
    DOI:10.1039/C3TA12607B, Communication

    Algal fluorescence sensor integrated into a microfluidic chip for water pollutant detection
    Florent Lefèvre, Annie Chalifour, Luping Yu, Vamsy Chodavarapu, Philippe Juneau and Ricardo Izquierdo
    Lab Chip, 2012,12, 787-793
    DOI:10.1039/C2LC20998E, Paper

    Optical sensing system based on wireless paired emitter detector diode device and ionogels for lab-on-a-disc water quality analysis Optical Sensing
    Monika Czugala, Robert Gorkin III, Thomas Phelan, Jennifer Gaughran, Vincenzo Fabio Curto, Jens Ducrée, Dermot Diamond and Fernando Benito-Lopez
    Lab Chip, 2012,12, 5069-5078
    DOI:10.1039/C2LC40781G, Paper

    Does soil water saturation mobilize metals from riparian soils to adjacent surface water? A field monitoring study in a metal contaminated region
    Liesbeth Van Laer and Erik Smolders
    Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2013,15, 1181-1190
    DOI:10.1039/C3EM00006K, Paper

    Photo-regenerable multi-walled carbon nanotube membranes for the removal of pharmaceutical micropollutants from water
    Qammer Zaib, Bilal Mansoor and Farrukh Ahmad
    Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2013,15, 1582-1589
    DOI:10.1039/C3EM00150D, Paper

    Water soluble flavonol prodrugs that protect against ischaemia-reperfusion injury in rat hindlimb and sheep heart
    Spencer J. Williams, Colleen J. Thomas, Mirna Boujaoude, Carlie T. Gannon, Shannon D. Zanatta, Bevyn Jarrott, Clive N. May and Owen L. Woodman
    Med. Chem. Commun., 2011,2, 321-324
    DOI:10.1039/C0MD00240B, Concise Article

    Water-soluble bis(1,10-phenanthroline) octanedioate Cu2+ and Mn2+ complexes with unprecedented nano and picomolar in vitro cytotoxicity: promising leads for chemotherapeutic drug development
    Andrew Kellett, Mark O’Connor, Malachy McCann, Orla Howe, Alan Casey, Pauraic McCarron, Kevin Kavanagh, Mary McNamara, Sean Kennedy, Donald D. May, Philip S. Skell, Denis O’Shea and Michael Devereux
    Med. Chem. Commun., 2011,2, 579-584
    DOI: 10.1039/C0MD00266F, Concise Article

    Graphene oxide for effective radionuclide removal
    Anna Yu. Romanchuk, Alexander S. Slesarev, Stepan N. Kalmykov, Dmitry V. Kosynkin and James M. Tour
    Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2013,15, 2321-2327
    DOI: 10.1039/C2CP44593J, Paper

    Direct prediction of the desalination performance of porous carbon electrodes for capacitive deionization
    S. Porada, L. Borchardt, M. Oschatz, M. Bryjak, J. S. Atchison, K. J. Keesman, S. Kaskel, P. M. Biesheuvel and V. Presser
    Energy Environ. Sci., 2013, Advance Article
    DOI: 10.1039/C3EE42209G, Paper

    Electrochemical SensorAn electrochemical sensor for the detection of antibiotic contaminants in water
    Michael Jacobs, Vinay J. Nagaraj, Tim Mertz, Anjan Panneer Selvam, Thi Ngo and Shalini Prasad
    Anal. Methods, 2013, 5, 4325-4329
    DOI: 10.1039/C3AY40994E

    Scavenging of benzodiazepine drugs from water using dual-functionalized silica nanoparticles
    Nezar H. Khdary, Ahmed E. Gassim and Alan G. Howard
    Anal. Methods, 2012, 4, 2900-2907
    DOI: 10.1039/C2AY25297J

    Guidelines for alkylphenols estimation as alkylphenol polyethoxylates pollution indicator in wastewater treatment plant effluents
    Y. Moliner-Martínez, J. M. Pastor-Carbonell, A. Bouzas, A. Seco, M. R. Abargues and P. Campíns-Falcó
    Anal. Methods, 2013, 5, 2209-2217
    DOI: 10.1039/C3AY00029J

    Development of a sensitive time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay for organophosphorus pesticides in environmental water samples
    Zhen-Lin Xu, Jie-Xian Dong, Jin-Yi Yang, Hong Wang, Yue-Ming Jiang, Hong-Tao Lei, Yu-Dong Shen and Yuan-Ming Sun
    Anal. Methods, 2012,4, 3484-3490
    DOI:10.1039/C2AY25534K

    Identification of bacteria in drinking water with Raman spectroscopy
    Jack van de Vossenberg, Heli Tervahauta, Kees Maquelin, Carola H. W. Blokker-Koopmans, Marijan Uytewaal-Aarts, Dick van der Kooij, Annemarie P. van Wezel and Bram van der Gaag
    Anal. Methods, 2013,5, 2679-2687
    DOI:10.1039/C3AY40289D

    A novel colorimetric biosensor for monitoring and detecting acute toxicity in water
    Junfeng Zhai, Daming Yong, Jing Li and Shaojun Dong
    Analyst, 2013, 138, 702-707
    DOI:10.1039/C2AN36160D

    Determination of selected natural hormones and endocrine disrupting compounds in domestic wastewater treatment plants by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry after solid phase extraction
    Melis Muz, M. Selcen Sönmez, Okan Tarık Komesli, Sezgin Bakırdere and Celal Ferdi Gökçay LC Electrosrpay ionization
    Analyst, 2012,137, 884-889
    DOI:10.1039/C2AN15644J

    Multifunctional nanostructured membrane for clean water reclamation from wastewater with various pH conditions
    Peng Gao, Darren Delai Sun and Wun Jern Ng
    RSC Adv., 2013, 3, 15202-15210
    DOI:10.1039/C3RA42181C

    Water-Stable Metal-Organic Frameworks with Intrinsic Peroxidase-like Catalytic Activity as a Colorimetric Biosensing Platform
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