5th IAHR Europe Congress

The 5th IAHR Europe Congress will take place in Trento, Italy from 12th-14th June. 

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The 5th IAHR Europe Congress aims to provide a forum where scientists, especially early career researchers, can present their work and discuss their ideas with experts in all fields of hydraulics.

For more information on registration, see the conference registration page and for further details including the full agenda, please visit the main conference website

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Outstanding Reviewers for Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology in 2017

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology in 2017, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Professor Yunho Lee, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology

Dr Zhen He, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Dr Timothy Julian, Eawag

Professor Long Nghiem, University of Wollongong

Professor Debora Rodrigues, University of Houston

Dr Neal Chung Tai-Shung, National University of Singapore

Dr Qian Zhang, University of Minnesota

Dr David Bagley, University of Wyoming

Dr Kristine Wammer, Saint Thomas University

Dr Meagan Mauter, Carnegie Mellon University

We would also like to thank the Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology board and the sustainable water community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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2018 Pacific Northwest WateReuse Conference

The 2018 Pacific Northwest WateReuse Conference will take place at the Sheraton Portland Airport Hotel in Portland, Oregon from May 17-18, 2018. 

 

This event welcomes individuals, organizations, and agencies with an interest in the design, management, operation, and use of water recycling facilities and projects in the Pacific Northwest and beyond. Presentations will focus on specific projects and topics for all phases of development including feasibility, planning, design, operations, public outreach, funding and regulatory updates.

Advance registration ends May 10, 2018.

To register and for more information, visit the website here.

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Introducing our New Associate Editor – Graham Gagnon

We are delighted to introduce Graham Gagnon as a new Associate Editor for Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology.

 

Professor Gagnon joins Xia Huang, Stuart Khan, Tamar Kohn, Paige Novak, and Mike Templeton as Associate Editors handling the peer review of submissions to the journal. More information about his research interests is given below:

Professor Gagnon is a Full Professor and NSERC/Halifax Water Industrial Research Chair in the Department of Civil & Resource Engineering at Dalhousie University. Graham works collaboratively with his research team and research partners to deliver applied water solutions that are grounded in fundamental principles of water science and technology.

 

Submit your high-impact work to Professor Gagnon’s office:

mc.manuscriptcentral.com/esw

 

 


Read some of Professor Gagonon’s latest research published in Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology:

Water quality and filter performance of nutrient-, oxidant- and media-enhanced drinking water biofilters
Amina K. Stoddart and Graham A. Gagnon

Prediction of disinfection by-product formation in drinking water via fluorescence spectroscopy
Benjamin F. Trueman, Sean A. MacIsaac, Amina K. Stoddart and Graham A. Gagnon

 

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Emerging Investigators Series – Takahiro Fujioka

 

Takahiro Fujioka received his B.Eng. in 2000 and M.Eng. in 2002 both in Chemical Engineering from Hiroshima University, Japan. He worked as a project manager at Fuji Electric Systems Co. Ltd. from 2002 to 2005. He undertook postgraduate training in Water Supply Engineering at UNESCO-IHE, Netherlands and graduated in April 2009. Thereafter, he worked as a project engineer at Mitsubishi Electric Co. until December 2010. From December 2010 to December 2013, Takahiro undertook a Ph.D. training project at the University of Wollongong, Australia. From December 2013 to April 2015, Takahiro worked as a research fellow at the University of Wollongong. In addition, he served as the secretary and a board member of the Membrane Society of Australasia from May 2013 to May 2015.

Takahiro is currently an Associate Professor at Nagasaki University. His research interests centre on water reuse using membrane technologies. He has published 34 international journal papers.

Read Takahiro’s Emerging Investigators paper “A steric pore-flow model to predict the transport of small and uncharged solutes through a reverse osmosis membrane” and find out more about him in the interview below:

 

Read more »

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Emerging Investigators Series – John D. Sivey

John D. Sivey is an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Towson University, where he is also a Fisher Endowed Chair in the Biological and Physical Sciences. Sivey’s research group investigates the chemistry and consequences of highly electrophilic halogenating agents in disinfected waters. His team also examines the transformation mechanisms and fate of “inert” constituents of agrochemical formulations. Sivey teaches courses in analytical and environmental chemistry, as well as an Honors College course entitled The Polluted States of America. 

Sivey received his PhD in Environmental Engineering and Chemistry from Johns Hopkins University, his MS in Environmental Engineering and Science from Clemson University, and his BS in Chemistry from Central Michigan University. Prior to joining the faculty of the Department of Chemistry at Towson University, Sivey completed postdoctoral work in the Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering at Yale University.

Read John’s Emerging Investigators paper “Comparing the inherent reactivity of often-overlooked aqueous chlorinating and brominating agents toward salicylic acid” and find out more about him in the interview below:

 

Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on the reactivity of chlorinating and brominating agents towards salicylic acid. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?

As an undergraduate student, I performed research in the area of physical organic chemistry, at which time I first became interested in chemical kinetics. While completing my MS thesis, I examined the long-term fate of polychlorinated biphenyls at the sediment-water interface of a lake in South Carolina, USA. Most of my PhD research focused on the kinetics of chlorination and bromination, particularly with respect to organic compounds in disinfected waters. While completing my PhD dissertation, it became clear that traditional models used to describe the behaviour of aqueous chlorine and bromine could not fully explain reactivity patterns associated with several types of organic compounds. Such traditional models typically assume HOCl and HOBr are the only kinetically-relevant chlorinating and brominating agents in waters treated with free chlorine. We discovered, however, that despite their typically low concentrations, several additional halogenating agents (such as BrCl, BrOCl, Cl2O, and others) can influence overall halogenation rates, especially for organic compounds with moderate reactivity toward aqueous chlorine and bromine. As my group’s paper about salicylic acid illustrates, I am still interested in fleshing out the solution conditions and organic compound classes that are most susceptible to halogenation by these less abundant (but highly electrophilic) halogenating agents.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

Most of my group’s halogenation research has (until recently) been performed in synthetic waters with carefully-controlled compositions. New experiments in my laboratory are delineating the contributions of species such as BrCl, BrOCl, et al., in natural waters following disinfection. Such experiments will help us to bridge the knowledge gap between comparatively clean synthetic waters and the more complex natural systems.

In your opinion, what is the potential impact on drinking water quality presented by halosalicylates?

Halosalicylates can have at least a two-fold impact on drinking water quality. Firstly, halosalicylates can attenuate drinking water quality by contributing to the overall toxicity of these waters, which depends on the specific chemical structures, concentrations, and persistence of the halosalicylates (and other toxicants) present. In addition, halosalicylates can undergo subsequent reactions (e.g., with chlorine or bromine) to form other disinfection byproducts that may be of greater or lesser concern than the halosalicylates themselves.

What do you find most challenging about your research?

Converting chemical kinetic data into mechanistic models is definitely one of the most challenging aspects of my group’s research. In the salicylic acid paper, for example, the possibility of salicyloyl hypochlorite serving as a reactive intermediate never crossed my mind prior to wrestling with the data and having helpful conversations with my colleagues.

In which upcoming conferences or events may our readers meet you?

I will be at the American Chemical Society’s National Conference in New Orleans beginning on March 18, 2018. I also plan to attend the Gordon Research Conference on Water Disinfection, Byproducts and Health beginning on July 28, 2019.

How do you spend your spare time?

I enjoy taking hikes with my two Labrador Retrievers, gardening, watching college sports, and playing arcade pinball (which, as it turns out, is enjoying a bit of a renaissance).

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

Were it not for environmental chemistry, I would have chosen meteorology. I had a short stint as a meteorology major as an undergraduate before switching to chemistry. If I were forced into a career outside of the sciences, it would be as a basketball referee (which was my side job as an undergraduate). It was once pointed out to me that meteorologists and referees are two jobs where you can routinely be incorrect and yet keep your job.

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

Look for the teachable moments in successes and in failures. My institution (Towson University) is primarily undergraduate, and I make it a point with my research students to celebrate the experiments that did not give the results we anticipated. I’m quick to remind my students that every new experiment can result in a discovery, even if that discovery is not the outcome the student (or I) had in mind.

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Introducing our New Associate Editor – Michael Templeton

We are delighted to introduce Michael Templeton as a new Associate Editor for Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology.

Michael has been an active member of the journal’s Editorial Board since launch and joins Xia Huang, Stuart Khan, Tamar Kohn and Paige Novak as Associate Editors handling submissions to the journal from 1st January 2018. More information about his research interests is given below.

Michael is a chartered civil engineer and Reader in Public Health Engineering in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Imperial College London. He is also the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. He holds a bachelor’s degree with honours in engineering science and a PhD in civil-environmental engineering, both from the University of Toronto

His research aims to develop engineering solutions to public health challenges relating to water supply and sanitation. His research focuses on the occurrence and control of chemical and biological contaminants in water, innovative water treatment processes, and effective water supply and sanitation interventions in low-income countries.

 

Submit your high-impact work to Dr Templeton’s office:
mc.manuscriptcentral.com/esw


Read some of Dr Templeton’s recent research published in Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology:

Defining the molecular properties of N -nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) precursors using computational chemistry
Tom Bond, Alexandra Simperler, Nigel Graham, Li Ling, Wenhui Gan, Xin Yange and Michael R. Templeton

Pitfalls and progress: a perspective on achieving sustainable sanitation for all
Michael R. Templeton

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Anaerobic Technology: Themed Issue

ESWRT welcomes your high-impact research for our upcoming Themed Issue on Anaerobic Technology, Guest Edited by Jeremy Guest, Paige Novak, and Aijie Wang

Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology seeks your high-impact research for our upcoming Themed Issue on Anaerobic Technology

Guest Edited by Jeremy Guest (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA) Paige Novak (University of Minnesota, USA) and Aijie Wang (Chinese Academy of Sciences, China), this issue will showcase high-impact original research, perspectives, and reviews, discussing state-of-the-art anaerobic bioprocesses.

The scope of this issue includes but is not limited to the following topics:

  • Anaerobic technology for resource recovery including bioenergy recovery, nutrient recovery, biochemical recovery, reuse of effluent and digestate
  • Anaerobic-centric technology for industrial and municipal wastewater treatment
  • Innovative/emerging anaerobic technologies including ANAMMOX, bioelectrochemical systems and its application in anaerobic processes
  • Intensifying anaerobic treatment
  • Liquid fuel production
  • Controlling communities
  • Innovations in hydrolysis

Submissions for this Themed Issue are due by 4th May 2018 – if you would like to submit to this Themed Issue, please contact the Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology Editorial Office at eswater-rsc@rsc.org to let us know.

Guest Editors: Left to Right – Jeremy Guest (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA) Paige Novak (University of Minnesota, USA) and Aijie Wang (Chinese Academy of Sciences, China)

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UV AOPs: Themed Issue

ESWRT welcomes your high-impact research for our Themed Issue on UVAOPs, Guest Edited by Dion Dionysiou, Graham Gagnon, Stuart Khan and Mike Templeton

Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology seeks your high-impact research for our upcoming Themed Issue on Ultraviolet-based Advanced Oxidation Processes (UV AOPs)

Guest Edited by Dion Dionysiou (University of Cincinnati, USA), Graham Gagnon (Dalhousie University, Canada), Stuart Khan (University of New South Wales, Australia) and Mike Templeton (Imperial College London, UK), this issue will showcase original research, perspectives, and reviews, relating to the following aspects of UV AOPs:

    • By-products, kinetics, and toxicity (e.g. mutagenicity, cytotoxicity) of UV AOP treatment of natural organic matter and micro-pollutants (e.g. pesticides, pharmaceuticals)
    • Topics on UV AOPs that use light-emitting diodes (LED) and/or other alternative UV sources besides mercury lamps are particularly encouraged
    • Comparisons of alternative UV AOP oxidants/processes (e.g. hydrogen peroxide, titanium dioxide, other emerging photocatalysts, chlorine, ozone, others)
    • The impact of pre-treatment steps on UV AOP performance
    • UV AOP fluence measurement; UV-LED-AOP measurement and performance monitoring during operation
    • Novel UV AOP reactor design and application of functionality
    • Life cycle assessments of UV AOPs
    • The impact of changing water matrices on UV AOP performance (e.g. different natural organic matter types, alkalinity)
    • UV AOP applications for wastewater treatment and water reuse
    • Modeling, scale up, process integration, and pilot/full scale performance evaluation of UV AOPs
    • Role of UV AOPs in water-energy-food nexus applications
    • Submissions that simply report the effectiveness of UV AOPs at degrading a particular target compound or set of compounds in pure lab-grade waters will not be considered.

Submissions for this Themed Issue are due by March 2018 – if you would like to submit to this Themed Issue, please contact the Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology Editorial Office at eswater-rsc@rsc.org to register your interest.

Guest Editors: Left to Right – Dion Dionysiou (University of Cincinnati, USA), Graham Gagnon (Dalhousie University, Canada), Stuart Khan (University of New South Wales, Australia) and Mike Templeton (Imperial College London, UK)

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Antimicrobial Resistance in Wastewaters

Antimicrobial Resistance in Wastewaters

24 November 2017, London, UK

Join our speakers…

  • Rachel Gomes, University of Nottingham, UK
  • Benedek G. Plósz, University of Bath, UK
  • Sara Rodríguez-Mozaz, Universitat de Girona, Spain
  • Thomas Berendonk, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany
  • Andrew Singer, NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, UK
  • William Gaze, University of Exeter Medical School, UK
  • Alistair Boxall, University of York, UK
  • Nicholas Gathergood, Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia
  • Jerker Fick, Umeå University, Sweden
  • Jason Snape, AstraZeneca, UK

and a diverse range of delegates discuss the latest issues and solutions to address antimicrobial resistance in wastewater treatment. The meeting forms part of a two day meeting, the first day (23rd November) focuses on Novel Therapeutics and Drug Discovery, organised in conjunction with the Academy of Pharmaceutical Sciences. RSC members can attend both days and will receive discounted member rates. Day rates are also available.

Register by 8th November to attend!

To find out more and register, please visit the webpage

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